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Thread: Schofield Revolver

  1. #1
    Member CGSwimmer25's Avatar
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    Default Schofield Revolver

    Does anyone have any experience with the Schofield top break revolver?

    www.uberti.com/firearms/top_break.php

  2. #2

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    A couple of friends in the lower states have them and really like them in their cowboy action shooting. One has th 45 Colt, and the other guy owns both a 38 Special and a 44 Russian. I've shot them all, and was really impressed. Knowing these two guys, I'm betting that they did action jobs, but I'm not sure. In any case, all three were very smooth functioning and fun to shoot. These guys shoot a lot, and the guns were still tight. And very accurate.

    I caution against any dreams of pumping up the ballistics though. Any top-break revolver, including the Schofield, simply won't allow it. But especially in 45 Colt, there's no reason to do so. Launch a hardcast with a large meplat at standard velocities, and it's going to land with plenty of oomph. I'd expect the same of the 44 Russian, though it's decidedly harder to locate brass and ammo in that caliber. I've whacked two deer with that 45 Colt loading, one at almost 50 yards, using a 4 5/8" Ruger BH, and was downright blown away by how quickly it killed- in spite of ballistics that most folks today would call "puny." Aint so. There's no need to hotrod the round, and good reasons not to in the Schofield.

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Default

    What BrownBear said.The little H&R Sportsman 999 in 22lr would be a neat pair up for one

  4. #4

    Default Revolver

    These revolvers were designed for 1873 colt style loads and higher pressure loads should be avoided. These are vintage style pistols using a slightly improved metalurgy; but still don't compare in strength anywhere near a modern single action.
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    Member CGSwimmer25's Avatar
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    So what is the biggest load you guys would suggest for this gun?

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    JMHO but 250gr. at 900pfs would be ablout max for shooting alot

  7. #7

    Default Ammo

    250 grn bullet @ around 800 fps under 14,000 cup. I believe that's about what the sights are regulated for.
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

    On the road of life..... Pot holes keep things interesting !

  8. #8

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    I own one of the first 45 Colt Schofields imported by Navy Arms and mfg by Uberti. I prefer to shoot 45 Schofield loads using the Schofield brass. When using 45 Colt loads you have to be careful and make sure they are seated deeper than those for the `73 colts, `75 Remingtons and modern Smiths, especially when using SWC's and LFNRP. Stay in the 750-900 fps range using 250 gr loads, even when using the 200 gr loads for the Schofield loads I stay within those parameters. The powders I prefer for both loads are either 700X or Red Dot.

  9. #9

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    That's really useful feedback. One of my buds is niggling me to do some reloading for him, and you've made it sound more interesting. Plus I have two unopened 8-pound kegs of 700X! I'm half way through a third, but consumption has been slow of late.

  10. #10
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    Default They are interesting revolvers to say the least.

    Quote Originally Posted by CGSwimmer25 View Post
    Does anyone have any experience with the Schofield top break revolver?

    www.uberti.com/firearms/top_break.php
    They are interesting revolvers to say the least. Back in the day, the Railroad bought a bunch of them, and so did Wells Fargo. Quite a number were produced and sold to Moscow for their troops.

    This is not a revolver that you want to hot-load cartridgfes for. It was designed in the era when black powder cartridge loadings were the only thing going, and it is not designed as a "magnum" situation. It was made for personal defense shooting with a reasonable barrel length, with a moderately pressured cartridge.

    The Schofields that I handled were smooth operating machines, fair triggers, and very easy to load and unload. There was reasonable combat accuracy, and recoil was nothing. They were well thought out in their day, and fairly durable. I liked them lots, but I am not really a collector of Schofields. I rate them highly as a piece of American History, and as a well engineered work for the times.

  11. #11
    Member CGSwimmer25's Avatar
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    I think it's a nice looking gun, but as I am not a collector, the only way I would drop the money on it is if I could get use out of it other than target shooting. I was curious what type of load it could handle for say, bear protection. By judging what I have heard so far it is just a collectors piece.

  12. #12

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    The Schofields are more than just collectors pieces they are built to shoot. However; are they intended for self defense, protection against big 4 legged critters or long range target? Absolutely not.
    Can the Schofield be used for self defense, of course it sure beats a stick or being unarmed, the design just doesn't allow hot rodding +P loadings. Will it stop a bear attack, probably not but then anything short of a 12 ga slug or 458 Mag won't either. If you don't have anything else then by all means throw the lead to the best of your ability.
    Target shooting can be fun with the Schofield with an understanding that the sighting system was meant for military combat use of the 1870's. The Schofield really shines in the cowboy action shooting and for general plinking. If you know how to shoot a handgun then the accuracy of the Schofields is good but it's not a bulls eye gun.

  13. #13

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    Here is a good article on the Schofield
    http://www.sam-hane.com/sass/schofield/

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