Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Where to go next summer?

  1. #1
    New member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Dublin OH
    Posts
    7

    Default Where to go next summer?

    I am planning a 2010 fishing trip, and am very seriously considering one of the so called do it yourself trips where the outfitter supplies the camping equipment and boat, drops you off and picks you up at the end - no guides along the way

    I have seen a couple of outfitters working out of Bethel advertising trips on various rivers in the southwest, as well as trips advertised for the Copper river area (Gulkana and Klutina).

    I am looking for the following on this trip:
    • Solitude from the crowds that are present along the road system during the salmon season
    • Moderately priced trip (ie 1500 - 2000) - cannot justify $5000 for one of the lodges
    • Combination of good salmon and rainbow fishing
    Any knowledge about the best rivers/areas of the state for such a trip would be appreciated, along with any personal experience on this kind of a trip would be appreciated.

  2. #2

    Default

    This article doesn't recommend any specific trips, but might help line you out with other considerations:

    http://www.alaskaflyfishinggoods.com...loat-Trip.html

  3. #3
    Member Phish Finder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Searching for more cowbell!
    Posts
    1,945

    Default

    Air taxi fees and raft rentals eat up your budget. How many folks are going?
    ><((((>.`..`.. ><((((>`..`.><((((>

    "People who drink light 'beer' don't like the taste of beer; they
    just like to pee a lot." --Capitol Brewery

  4. #4
    New member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Dublin OH
    Posts
    7

    Default

    Right now there are only two of us. However, we could always recruiter 1 or 2 more in order to help spread the cost

  5. #5
    Member Phish Finder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Searching for more cowbell!
    Posts
    1,945

    Default

    The Gulkana is on the road system. It won't be lonely but it's in your price range. I think Blue Moose on here putzes around that area quite a bit. Maybe shoot him a PM or look around in the rafting forum for some of his posts.
    ><((((>.`..`.. ><((((>`..`.><((((>

    "People who drink light 'beer' don't like the taste of beer; they
    just like to pee a lot." --Capitol Brewery

  6. #6
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    931

    Thumbs up Do-It-Yourself Float Trips

    Quote Originally Posted by wilsoninohio View Post
    I am planning a 2010 fishing trip, and am very seriously considering one of the so called do it yourself trips where the outfitter supplies the camping equipment and boat, drops you off and picks you up at the end - no guides along the way

    I have seen a couple of outfitters working out of Bethel advertising trips on various rivers in the southwest, as well as trips advertised for the Copper river area (Gulkana and Klutina).

    I am looking for the following on this trip:
    • Solitude from the crowds that are present along the road system during the salmon season
    • Moderately priced trip (ie 1500 - 2000) - cannot justify $5000 for one of the lodges
    • Combination of good salmon and rainbow fishing
    Any knowledge about the best rivers/areas of the state for such a trip would be appreciated, along with any personal experience on this kind of a trip would be appreciated.
    Hello wilsoninohio -

    Here in Alaska you have grand Statewide options and countless opportunities for the unguided do-it yourself float trip... from mild to wild... less demanding to challenging... drive-to to fly-outs ... few days to multiple weeks... floating, sportfishing, wildlife viewing, hunting, sightseeing camping...

    For people in your shoes - planning for & putting together the finest experience, most suitable float, having the correct/current info, gearing up with the right people at the right time and place, with organized comprehensive outfitting (then putting this all in-sync) can be very trying - often unfortunately leading to trials with errors and extra cost involved.

    I'm here to tell you it does not have to be this way. My site, emailing, calling me, or a PM on this site is the one stop do-it yourself float trip in the making. We'll demonstrate/deliver the highest standard of services Statewide.

    I read your planned expenditure and trip ideas... descriptions all sound good and doable from my end. I think it would at very least be worthwhile contacting me.

    Brian

  7. #7
    Member BlueMoose's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Rifle River MI
    Posts
    1,835

    Default Once and a while

    Thanks for the plug eh! I did PM him on the side with some data about a certain river and a certain time of year and well within his price range. There are so many choices and so little time most have reasonable options and cost if you do some homework.

    As an example you can ship at a reasonable rate to McGrath using NAC and get there for a reasonable price commercial then hire your puddle jumper and fly you into to several options about Mid July Kings, Chums, Reds, Dollies, Grayling, Pike and some Shea Fish. No crowds just lots of fish excluding great rainbows.

    If I were planning I would plan for Mid to late August that opens a lot of doors on a lot of rivers.

    I would also talk to Brian he is a wealth of knowledge and has been there and done that in several places and provides good informaiton in great detail.

    Shoot me a PM if your looking for more indepth information about my first PM.

    Tight Lines and Best Wishes.

  8. #8
    New member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    McGrath, AK
    Posts
    3

    Default McGrath rafting trips

    Hi, I'd recommend checking us out at Magnuson Airways in McGrath. Cessna 180, Cessna 206, and Piper PA-12 aircraft on wheels are available. We offer raft rentals, float trip drop-offs and pick-ups, all within your price range. The Swift River about 40 minutes South-East of McGrath is a great drop-point, we can fly 2 people with a raft and gear using our Cessna 206 on wheels. From there you can float down to the mouth of the Gagaryah or Cheeneetnuk Rivers, where the fishing is phenomenal. The whole float back to the Kuskokwim River is through amazing terrain and is packed with places to run out of film at.

    We can also drop you off on the Tatluwiksuk or further up the Cheeneetnuk to float out to the Kusko, depending on the level of the rivers. Lower water makes it easier to find suitable gravel bars for landing. Our Piper PA-12 can haul one person and gear into more remote sites after the whole group has been staged with the 206. All Swift River/Cheeneetnuk/Tatluwiksuk floats are picked up downriver at the village of Stoney River, on the Kuskokwim. For more info, call us at (877) 524-3123 and ask to speak to Barney or myself. Or, email us at:

    http://magnusonairways.com/contact.html

    info@magnusonairways.com

    Devon
    Attached Images Attached Images

  9. #9
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,162

    Default The requisite outdoor skills...and knowledge too

    Equipment you'll need: Starts with your skill and experience level. The right river for me begins with a list of rivers matching my knowledge/ability first. Any wilderness trip up here, even if you hire an outfitter to help with gear, takes a lot of planning to succeed I think. The article link posted by Tsiutoo is helpful; sketching a reasonable idea of what to expect - in rewards and work. Reading for information, both on these forums and in some specific books, is what I'd be doing next. Of course, my experience is much more limited than many on these forums, 8 trips over 4 years - but I'd be focusing now on information I'll need to select rivers, then to potentially lead my group planning and during the float. Books by Karen Jetmar especially, and Mike Strahan too can suggest the Class (I or II?) rivers suited for first floats in AK, and would be my choices for reading at this point.

    Planning for all: defining your goals is important:

    • Solitude from the crowds that are present along the road system during the salmon season
    • Moderately priced trip (ie 1500 - 2000) - cannot justify $5000 for one of the lodges
    • Combination of good salmon and rainbow fishing

    Defining the goals of others on the trip will help too. Every float day will be a lot of work; breaking camp, loading, unloading, setting up camp. Inclement weather only adds to the work. Positive attitudes, humor, physical fitness help get the work done, contribute to the morale and welfare of others, and make the best learning experience for all. Meeting the trip goals of all will insure the best morale and contributions from all members who are sharing the cost, work and planning.

    The cost of solitude: Among goals you specified for your trip, solitude and price will likely be inversely related. The best value trip will be a DIY trip that includes driving to/from your put-in/take-out. The simplest logistics will include an outfitter who provides your gear. Getting off the road system will cost more, usually requiring air charter. Planes are expensive - and your group's total personnel + cargo weight will determine what type of plane you need (see other threads for aircraft cargo capacities-approximate: http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=58613), which dictates the cost per flight. Four people (200lbs each) with no gear, already puts you into at least a Beaver. Round trip, flying your group 1-hour's flight time in a Beaver might blow your budget, unless you were planning for $1,500 - $2,000 each.

    The cost of good fishing: It's getting expensive to find good fishing in solitude up here, for all of us who don't live on Alaska's best rivers. Again, I think you'll often find a trade-off between solitude and cost if good fishing is a goal. The Kenai, Talkeetna, Susitna, Little Susitna, Gulkana and other road-accessible fisheries offer a wide-range of fishing opportunities. Some will and some won't offer good trout fishing. As soon as you hire a plane, the solitude improves - sometimes along with better fishing opportunites.

    You have some veteran rafters commenting on this thread already, which illustrates how valuable this forum can be. But, the relevant knowledge and skills needed by you and members of your group can be considerable. One phrase worth notice in Tsiutoo's article, "if you have the requisite outdoor skills, a DIY trip will be considerably cheaper". In my mind, "if you have the requisite outdoor skills" encompasses more than on the water skills. Someone, usually the trip organizer, will assess the goals and skills of the group, select a river, build a gear list, purchase/assemble river-worthy (tough, waterproof) containers, build a packing list, weigh the equipment, build a menu and food list, buy/ship the food, educate the group on bear awareness/avoidance, start the packing process, hire an outfitter who'll help with gear (or not), contact the outfitter to ask detailed questions about fuel, repair kits, best flies for fishing, etc.

    Good luck!

  10. #10
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default Lots of great info...

    Great post Dwight!




    Wilson,


    You got lots of great advice from Phish and others. Not much I can add (in a timely manner). Sometimes a picture is worth a thousand words. Below are some assorted pics in a slideshow from our float trips. Mostly NW, one trip to SW, and a few from the Upper Kenai this past Sept are thrown in as well. The wife and I take a different trip each year. There is no better way to see Alaska than a float trip if you ask me. I know of a few rivers that would be well suited for a first float trip. PM me if you want any info. Happy to share any info that may be of use to you. It may seem like a tough nut to crack at first, but it is easy as pie man. Just takes some insight and good planning. Picking an appropriate river and deciding the trip timing is crucial for success (and safety).

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/2114408...27567944/show/





    .
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  11. #11
    Member Michael's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Anchorage / Glennallen
    Posts
    162

    Default

    Thanks Dan,

    Really enjoyed the images.

    How do you (or your friends) like the sotar raft? What is the butterfly looking tarp called and where did you aquire it?

    Thanks,

    Michael

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    376

    Default Papa Bear?

    Check out these guys in Bethel. http://www.pbadventures.com/ Click on the fishing tab and see all the great rivers they do trips on. They are a first class air taxi for fishing and hunting.

  13. #13
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael View Post
    Thanks Dan,

    Really enjoyed the images.

    How do you (or your friends) like the sotar raft? What is the butterfly looking tarp called and where did you aquire it?

    Thanks,

    Michael

    Love the Sotar. Still pretty new to rafting. Just used it up in arctic NW for an easy class I river, that is when I picked it up. Bought it from Goo Vogt of Alaska Wildwater in Anch, he sent it up to Kotz via NAC and we received it. Used it in June on two class III rivers in the Smoky Mountains of NC, private 1:1 instruction there, just trying to learn the ropes. Then used it on the Upper Kenai in Sept for a week. But so far, loving it man. Built like a brick shet house. The tarp is an MSR Parawing. About 8 lbs, but when the weather goes south, it is worth it's weight in gold. Nice to hang out under, cook, etc.. A discountinued model, but they have several new models, some smaller, some larger.


    Dan
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •