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Thread: Soliciting advise for our moose meat

  1. #1

    Default Soliciting advise for our moose meat

    Hello, my buddy and I just filled our DM798 cow tag this weekend. Let me give you the details of the hunt, he shot our cow at 10:00, perfect shot to the neck that dropped her like a bag of rocks with one shot. She passed maybe 2 minutes after he shot her with no meat damage. She was a beautiful cow, healthy and fat, maybe 800-900 or so pounds. We had her quartered completely by 15:30, and had her hanging to cool by 16:30, this was Saturday in Delta Junction. Saturday night the wind was blowing in our camp steadily at 15-20mph with frequent gusts to 50mph. The ambient temp's were probably 30-35 F, so the meat cooled quickly and was quite cool this morning.

    Now she is hanging in my friends shed in East Anchorage, per Mesonet (great site: http://pafc.arh.noaa.gov/mesonet.php ) it is 47 right now at 22:00, not the ideal temperature. Over the next couple days it is supposed to get to around the low 50's during the day and around 40 at night, this is also not ideal aging temps from what I understand.

    So what should we do with our moose? Clean her tomorrow and take her to the butcher Tuesday? Let her hang for a couple days and butcher her on Wednesday evening? Any suggestions and opinions are greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
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    Let it hang.

    Put a fan on it to keep away the flys and put a dry "Crust" on the meats and let it hang and age.
    If you start cutting and packageing meat, yourself, over the next 4 or so days, you will be fine and done with time to spare. If you take it to the processor, it'll get refidged there I figure...

    Your meat is freash, it'll be a week at those temps be fore you have concerns, just dont be lazy, or pray harder for colder weather...~~LOL!!~~
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

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  3. #3

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    Like the above post says your meat will be fine. Let it hang until at least wed-thur and then cut your roasts and steaks yourself. I've hung two moose in my garage in Anchorage in those temps and everything was fine.

  4. #4
    Member Phil's Avatar
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    Default Depends

    I'm a great believer that a freezer does what hanging used to do. If it was me and I planned on freezing my moose meat, I would butcher it ASAP, then freeze it, and enjoy it all winter.

    BTW, I've killed 3 AK moose and 1 NH moose so I do have some experience with moose meat in freezers.
    Last edited by Phil; 10-12-2009 at 06:29. Reason: poor grammar

  5. #5
    Member Vince's Avatar
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    let it hang,,, you will get a much tender cut if allowed to cure a bit.

    this years bull was badly bruised and beaten, every 1/4 was purple and yellow; he hung 15 days on a pole under a tarp.as long as it is cool and air moves around it it will stay nice.

    we had no souring or smell in our meat after 15 days,


    figure most comercial meats hang 28 days, the longer it hangs the more the break down occurs on teh cellualr level and creats a tender cut of meat.


    the only time i run for the freezer is when it is very hot out or i am short on time.
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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    Member terbear747's Avatar
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    It may already be bad.....you can give it to me and I'll dispose of it for you

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    Default enzymes

    are usually broken down in about 72 hours. after that time, i am not sure what you would gain from hanging it any longer.

  8. #8
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    Default Hanging

    I got my Fairbanks Managment Area cow on Wednesday. I hung it on Friday morning/afternoon. I was getting a bit concerned about day time temps in the mid 50's as well, however 35-40 in the mornings. I am going to let her hang. Weather is forecasted to be a little colderd during the days, and nights as well.

    As long as you have good temps, not too hot, and a breeze I think you will be fine for a week or two. If you see a warm spell coming, I would be gettting anxious about getting it processed.

  9. #9

    Default

    For a cow moose, I think I would butcher it and be done with it. We typically butcher before it crusts over so we don't have the added work and waste.

  10. #10

    Default I would

    butcher it asap. Even though this would start a new thread, I have read and found that hanging really doesn't help game meat much. I know some people hang for days and days and days, so I guess it is all personal preference. I would start cutting it up tonight.

  11. #11
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    I've never hung. Get home, cut, vacuum seal, freeze. I've never been able to tell the difference between aged and not aged. Improper cooking is the thing I see most with wild game and contributes more to non-tender meat than anything.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    What I recommend you do is put at least two fans on the meat. This will keep the meat from going bad for a few days. I would start working on the meat you are going to use for hamburger, (like the front ľ) it does not need to be age also your back strap and tenderloins can be process (not for hamburger).
    The ribs I wash down with water before cutting up.
    When cutting up the hind quarter, I separate the muscles sections and stick my finger in the meat to see if itís tender.
    Another trick we do is put all the meat of the same type in a card board box, when you want to move the meat around in the freezer it makes life a little easier.

    Leaving the meat hang for more than 3 days is not needed at these temperatures.

  13. #13
    Member stevelyn's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sh View Post
    are usually broken down in about 72 hours. after that time, i am not sure what you would gain from hanging it any longer.
    Hanging it longer allows the collegen to break down more leaving you with more tender meat even on the usual tough cuts.
    Now what ?

  14. #14

    Default

    WOW...I'm really surprised to the varied responses to this question. This was actually a recent topic of discussion among my family on hanging our Caribou...which many I hear don't hang. Although not a moose, I decided to hang for 4 days total and was quite happy with it.

    I'll be watching this thread and learning.
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  15. #15
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    Default hanging moose

    As long as time permits, we hang our moose 10-14 days. Our shed stays cool during the day and with two fans going the meat gets a good coating on it. We monitor it to ensure that none of it goes bad. We have been doing it this way for over 40 years and have never had any bad meat. Let it hang and proesss it when you can.

  16. #16

    Thumbs up

    I prefer to butcher as soon as possible. Makes for less waste.

    But....I know a few folks that like a little twang to the meat. No Joke
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  17. #17
    Member junkak's Avatar
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    Ours hung for 32 days, 25 days and last one was for 12 days.

    All in a cooler at around 38f.

    The first moose was in the field 6 days. Second moose was in the field 1.5 days and third was around a week.

    Out of all that moose we found one piece (oldest and biggest back) that had a few small white wiggly things in it. (yes i know what they were.) It was localized to a cut in the tenderloin and some in a flap where the ribs came off.

    We processed all of the moose ourselves so we KNOW what is in it.

    The oldest meat was prime. Wouldn't want to hang it any longer. BUT when fried up on the grill it tastes like sirloin.

    Hanging for a long duration in optimal conditions will greatly enhance the meat flavor. Just ask any fancy steakhouse.

  18. #18
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default Not hanging it...

    Quote Originally Posted by tdelarm View Post
    ... hanging... Caribou...which many I hear don't hang...
    ... produces the well known but never popular caribou farts of camp lore.

  19. #19
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    Default Really not bragging

    I've dealt with 1 moose every year sence 97 and helped out with others. Not to mention other game I have had the pleasure to work with in the past. Two weeks is what I aim for. I've done the cut it/freeze it/right now thing, and never got tender steaks. Do what you want but thats what I have had great luck with. Also you will find that the meat is a lot cooler then you may think in this temp. Check it everyday stick your nose right up to it if you smell the slightest funk, cut it. I'm guessing it will be just fine. If you are going to be grinding up the fronts,and lose meat I would do them now, as mentioned earlyer hanging it won't matter. The inside loins should of allready been eaten, and the back staps if off the bone can also be cut and wraped, but I still try to hang them a week or so. Happy eating

  20. #20
    Member Magnum Man's Avatar
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    Default heres on for you

    We got a moose on saturday at ( a couple weeks ago)noon had it hanging by dark. It cleared up and frosted nice and cool that nite. And had the meat pole tarped off. The next 4 days it was between 40 to 45 degrees. We got back to town on thursday and hung it all in a large unheated naturally ventilated shop still about 40 deg. On wednsday we had to butcher for sure some of the meat had to be washed in vineger. We used apple cider vineger. We pretty much saved it just in time. For some reason the meat just didnt get a real good glaze to it. Ive had deer hanging off the boat as camp meat in 60deg for 4 or 5 days and we just trimmed off the glaze and it was still good. Not sure what happened.

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