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Thread: About Nipping

  1. #1
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    Default About Nipping

    So my wonderful little Biscuit likes to nip quite a bit. Well basically all of the time. I know that it is normal for dogs this age, but I'm wondering what I should be doing in response. Should I:

    A.) Let her nip away, and consider it a normal part of her development

    B.) Let her nip as long as she is gentle, and then reprimand her when she gets to rough

    C.) Tell her no every time so that she eventually stops. This would turn our time together in to me telling her no over and over and over.

    D.) ????????????????


    Any good suggestions for a newbie with a puppy?



    Jeremiah

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    I suspect Biscuit has the sharp little puppy teeth, and it hurts to get nipped.

    Is she nipping because she is playing and having fun, or doing it because she is mean? I would have a hard time believing she is doing it because she is mean.

    I think you should discourage unwanted behavior, and encourage good behavior. All of my dogs outgrew their nipping behavior. I would give the pup a little tap, with a stern , No. If you are consistent, she will get it. It is hard to let a pretty little pup know especially when the kids are around.

    In a nutshell, I would pick B. Option C may turn out to be unproductive.
    Last edited by BigDaddy; 10-10-2009 at 08:48. Reason: added options

  3. #3
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    She is just playing in the only way she knows how. So far option B is what I've been doing. I just don't want to come across as inconsistent. I also don't want to encourage/discourage a behavior in a way that will damage her "work" later on in life.



    Jeremiah

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    jeremiahak,

    We don't allow pups to put their teeth on us, not even when playing. Something that I have found that works is when she goes to nip you, yell ouch and at the same time wrapping her lips over the top of her teeth gently, with a very firm NO! If the pressure you used does not work, try it a little harder the next time she goes to nip. I have noticed that it would only take once maybe twice and they get the idea. Then when your are done with that, give her a toy to chew on. She'll eventually learn what she can chew on and that human body parts are a no, no.

    I know its a whole lot of fun having a new pup, but keep in mind this one thing. Never let them do things now that you wouldn't allow a 75-100lb dog to do when its grown and you'll be one step ahead of us all.
    "In the interest of protecting my privacy I will no longer be accepting Private Messages generated from this site and if you email me, it better be good!"

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    Default Allowing behavior

    I agree, do not allow behavior to continue that you do not want to see later. Habits are harder to break than just building in the right stuff to start.
    Look at yourself also. You being the human element in the house. How do you approach her? What is your stance? Posture? Voice? Eye contact? You may be encouraging play without knowing it.
    When I am around new dogs there are certain things I do and don't do. Those things change after I get to know the dog better, and also understand the desires of the owner.
    Sounds to me like your pup is being a pup. Keep having fun.

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    Thanks for the advice. I don't want to get crazy concerned about every little thing with her, and in doing so loose the enjoyment of having a new puppy. I just want to have a great dog for the rest of her life. I'm an owner for life, for better or worse, type of guy.

    She is a great dog so far. I'm not sure that her owners have proven there worth yet though.


    Jeremiah

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    jeremiahak,


    You said it all right there. It's not training the pup, it's training YOU!
    "In the interest of protecting my privacy I will no longer be accepting Private Messages generated from this site and if you email me, it better be good!"

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Huntress View Post
    jeremiahak,

    We don't allow pups to put their teeth on us, not even when playing. Something that I have found that works is when she goes to nip you, yell ouch and at the same time wrapping her lips over the top of her teeth gently, with a very firm NO! If the pressure you used does not work, try it a little harder the next time she goes to nip. I have noticed that it would only take once maybe twice and they get the idea. Then when your are done with that, give her a toy to chew on. She'll eventually learn what she can chew on and that human body parts are a no, no.

    I know its a whole lot of fun having a new pup, but keep in mind this one thing. Never let them do things now that you wouldn't allow a 75-100lb dog to do when its grown and you'll be one step ahead of us all.
    I used the lips over the the teeth trick, and they catch on pretty quickly to this, and excellent idea on chew toy. You are on the right track, teach her early, and will make your life easier down the road. Dogs are smart to the degree they will manipulate their owners. I have a Jack Russell, Springer mix. He is a pistol, but hard headed as a rock.

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    Default gun training

    I got a lab 10 years ago, and best familiy dog I ever owned. However, it never overcame being gun shy. Extremely frustrating when I got him for hunting. I don't know go tactics to overcome this, but I suspect sooner than later is better.

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    The nipping is getting better. Thank you guys for the help. Tomorrow we are off to see the vet.

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    Default Nipping

    Besides pups, I had to cure this with a couple of rehomed dogs who were probably never taught not too nip. If it breaks the skin it is a bite according to animal control so it's in your best interest to stop it, even in fun.
    Huntress and Big Daddy (?) approach worked on these older dogs pretty quickly. I assume the effort had been attempted but now with a new owner they thought they'd give me a little butt nip. Consistancy was a challenge. The pup may turn to easier targets like the kids - or a spouse who thinks its cute or just "love bites". They have to follow suit to make it consistant.

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    Still working hard on this issue. She was nipping away at the vet today. I think it is confusing to her that the kids don't reprimand her when she nips. I'm trying to get my wife to be a little bit more consistent with it when she's here during the day. I know that she'll get it if we do our part.

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    Default Nip is play

    You decide if it is OK or not. I used to eliminate all tendency to nip. My current pup is 1.5 years old. I allow her to grab me, and she and I "groom" each other. She and I take turns giving nips or bites to the chin.
    We don't have small children, so I don't have that worry. And for most adults, she does not do it. For a few, that she bonds with, she will act submissive and share grooming bites with. When I had her at work after she broke her leg, one co-worker would come in once a day to see her. He is a dog guy, and they bonded. She would come out of the kennel, climb up, and give grooming bites to his chin. Still, she was submissive through it all.
    In my family, I am the only person she acts this way with.
    Some may say I shouldn't, some may say it's cute. What I will say is this. Know your dog. Know yourself. Know your environment. Understand what drives a dog, and specifically your dog. Is your pup alpha? Submissive? Aggressive? You need to figure it out from the cues she gives.
    I think, based on what you write, that you are on the right track. Being conservative is especially smart when you have kids at risk. Even though the chances are Biscuit will not be aggressive, kids do not understand how a dog interfaces with others, and dogs advance quickly physically, which in and of itself places the kids at a disadvantage.
    She will continue to explore her parameters. It is up to you to continue to establish and maintain them for her.

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