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Thread: New to ice fishing and need advise.

  1. #1
    Member
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    Sep 2006
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    Delta Junction, AK
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    Question New to ice fishing and need advise.

    Hello All,

    I am new to Ice Fishing and need any and all advise I can get. I plan on trying it out Wednesday for the first time on Quartz Lake north of Delta Junction, AK. Any help on what to do, how to set up, what equipment to have, would really help.

    Highest Regards.
    Mark

  2. #2
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Jun 2006
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    Central peninsula, between the K-rivers
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    Smile Basics

    You will need an auger- if you go hand auger get a 6" with an extension. Get a small rod with a decent reel and some flexible mono. Depending on what you are fishing for, 12 pound should more than do it. Get a variety of spoons and spinners- Swedish Pimples and Cast Masters work well. Get a couple small bottles of Pautzkis (sp) Balls of Fire eggs, and some small uncooked shrimp are always good to have along too.

    Beyond basics:
    If you are an airline pilot, as your handle suggests ($$$$$), go ahead and get yourself a folding ice tent ($200), and a nice 10" power auger ($250). I favor Eskimo, but others would differ with me. A few tip-ups would be nice for lake trout and large char. Heck, throw in a new snowmachine for good measure to tow it all!

    There are some really serious icefishermen up your way, and they are probably best contacted through IceShanty.com . They can get you lined out on all the local lore. Another resource is "The Highway Angler- Ice Fisherman" by Gunnar Pedersen. Everything you need to know is there.

  3. #3

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    If you are looking for a simple intorductory setup I would start with these items

    Auger: A gas auger is much more convienant but cumbersome. I love my inexpensive hand auger because is acceptable for one or two holes, but it takes time and plenty of energy. Once the blades are dull it is a bear to punch holes in the ice.

    5 Gal. Bucket: You need something to carry the gear if you choose to go sledless.

    Stool: I have a small, light in weight, stool that is just perfect for long hikes. Also the 5 gal bucket can be emptied and turned upside down, or some buckets come with padded lids.

    Pole: A small pole that is plenty stout for large char yet light enough to have fun while fishing for pan fry. I prefer cheap rods since I have lost plenty down the hole. A good reel is critical. Cheap reels seem to give me grief in the cold and layers of water continually freezing in and on both the spool and primary components do not help. Line; I use 6lbs ice fishing mono on all my ice fishing reels. One item I recommend for EVERY ice fishing pole is the strike indicator that is attached to the end of the rod and extends about three inches past the tip. The line is fed through the end of the strike indicator and emphasizes even the slightest strikes.

    Tackle: I carry extra line, single hooks, small split shocks, swivels, and a few select spoons. Cocktail shrimp is my bait of choice due to the fact it is cheap and very effective.

    The gear listed above is more than plenty to get you started and is what I use on most of my outtings. For even more conveinance I carry all of my gear in a sled. When my holes are drilled I will sometimes set the sled up in the air and sit inside the sled to keep the wind off me. It works quite well if you ask me.

  4. #4
    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    If you're going to Quartz call DNR and reserve a state owned ice shanty. Only $15 a day bring wood because they have stoves in them

    I concur with the others advice on gear but would add picking up a swivel seal that snaps onto a 5 gal bucket--gear carrier and seat in one package.

    And a wire rod holder either the kind that rests on the ice or clips onto your bucket

    For shrimp as bait--raw only the pre-cooked falls off the hook too easily. I peel and chop the shrimp into nuggets and put them into a small tupperware or ziploc. This way you're bait is prepped. 3 or 4 shrimp is enough bait for a days worth of hot fishing.

    Enjoy!

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