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Thread: what are your three favorite cookbooks?

  1. #1
    Member homerdave's Avatar
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    Question what are your three favorite cookbooks?

    my favorite for recipes is the "terrific pacific cookbook"
    for general info on methods, styles and ingredients i like joy of cooking (either edition) and "cooking alaskan".
    Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
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    Member Phish Finder's Avatar
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    Ma Gastronomie

    The Sauce Bible

    The Escoffier Cookbook



    If I had any talent and enough time, I would love to be a saucier.

    I like ah da sauce!
    ><((((º>¸.·´¯`·.¸¸.·´¯`·..¸¸ ><((((º>`·.¸¸¸.·´¯`·.¸¸><((((º>

    "People who drink light 'beer' don't like the taste of beer; they
    just like to pee a lot." --Capitol Brewery

  3. #3

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    LL Bean Game and Fish Cookbook by Angus Cameron (the best in its class)

    Joy of Cooking by Rombauer and Becker (the Bible)

    Essentials of Italian Cooking by Marcella Hazan (legacy to you, Mom)

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    Member Alaska Grandma's Avatar
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    #1 Joy of Cooking. Got it as a wedding present long long ago and it shows it age Like me

    #2 Back to Basics, a reader's Digest book. Filled with all kinds of interesting stuff, but the recipe chapters are hard to beat.

    #3. Alaska Magazine's Cabin Cookbook. Found lots of good, easy recipes in there.

    And well, if there can be a #4...Surfing the web. So much information on there. Probably the ultimate cookbook.

    Grandma Lori
    If God had intended us to follow recipes,
    He wouldn't have given us grandmothers. ~Linda Henley

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    Member atvalaska's Avatar
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    Thumbs up (LL Bean Game and Fish Cookbook by Angus Cameron ) is good!

    ....doctor bbqs "big book of bbq'.... "bettey crocker manuel" from 1962 .....a old "taste of home" fish and game cook book ... and my notes..(well i aint printed it yet)...aka "squeal on u bbq"
    WHEN IN DOUBT> THROTTLE OUT.......

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    Member garnede's Avatar
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    I rarely use cook books, I cook more by taste and what I have available, but when I do...
    (1943) Victory Cook Book
    Mastering the art of french cooking (Julia Child)
    The Backcountry kitchen
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

  7. #7
    Member grcg's Avatar
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    Default What a great question! I am going to bend your rules a bit ....

    I read cookbooks like they were novels. I love trying to figure out why someone would put those flavors together or cook something a certain way – or what would possess someone to try to eat something in the first place. So, in looking for a cookbook, I look for one that will tell a good story, or show me food or flavors that I am not familiar with (historically or regionally), or that will explain how and why ingredients work together.

    Here are some of my current favorites (in no particular order).

    #1: A Birdwatcher’s Cookbook: This is the book that got me started on my cookbook collection and is one of my perennial favorites. Great stories and recipes by a woman who loved birds, birdwatchers and making sure everyone had a good meal. You gotta love a cookbook that has a recipe that calls a 48 gallon kettle and 25 pounds of flour. (scrapple recipe).

    #2: United Methodist Church - Albert Lea, Minnesota cookbook. (or one of the other church cookbooks I have managed to get my hands on.) . Familiar midwestern recipes - Lots of casserole and bars.

    #3: The Kitchen Bible – Feed Two, Five, Ten, Fifty or 100: This local cookbook is by Marge Stav and was published in 1974. In cooking for the Alaska Railroad for 9 years, Mrs. Stav has some strategies and some stories to share about feeding hungry railroad workers and passengers with what she had on hand. It is put together like she just dumped all the information out of her head, so it is hard to follow sometimes. But in the end, that is part of the charm and story of the book.

    #4: Valdez Historical Cookbook: This cookbook is set up with sections of recipes from 1916 and 1950. It is really interesting to look at the differences in ingredients and how the recipes were written over the decades. Reading between the lines, it becomes a neat little window into how our cooking and food has changed with the availability of different foods.

    #5: Traditional Food Guide For Alaska Native Cancer Survivors: The only thing wrong with this book is that I wish there was more of it. They did a great job on the layout and research. But it is pretty abbreviated. There is a small recipe section. But the thing I really like is the pages describing locally available foods. They even figured out the Nutritional Facts for stuff like muskrat, seal, beach asparagus and wild potatoes! How cool is that?

    #6: On Food and Cooking / The Professional Chef / Ratio / Joy of Cooking: I like to wing it. I want to take something from the fridge and pair it with this neat thing I got from the store and try to have it come out like I imagine it should. (Ha!) So…I continue to gather knowledge about how different ingredients work together under different conditions so I can make my impromptu creations better. These books are on the more scientific/analytical side of things.

    #7: Garden Greens (part of the Company’s Coming series by Jean Pare): This is a great salad book. It has both light and hearty recipes. All sorts of ingredients are used. And while I like the Moosewood cookbook – I also like meat. When we go to a potluck, the Spinach-Bacon salad out of this book is what folks usually ask us to bring.

    #8: One Thousand Years over a Hot Stove / Hidden Kitchens / The Making of a Chef / The Soul of a Chef: These aren’t cookbooks so much as discussions of food and cooking from a personal or historical perspective. Great stories!!

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    Joy of Cooking (1975)
    Larousse Gastronomique
    Bread cookbook from the farm journal

    The internet is where I get a lot of recipes if the Joy doesn't have it.

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    Arrow 3 favorite cookbooks

    Smoking Salmon & Trout, by Jack Whelan
    Escoffier
    http://www.cooksillustrated.com/ (with a paid membership there)

    The first two have no substitute anywhere that I'm aware of, for what they contain.

    More and more often I'm finding the best recipe for a particular dish is found at that Cooks Illustrated online site, even though I'm decent at finding great free recipes on the Internet-at-large as well. The latest example of this for me was a first rate French Onion Soup recipe.

  10. #10
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    Arrow Many Alaskan 'pro' recipes - and they're free

    If you haven't been over here
    http://www.fishalaskamagazine.com/recipes.htm
    as a source of some really nice recipes for salmon/halibut/more, than this page will be a treat for you to check out.

  11. #11

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    i have a brunch of diff cookbooks..


    betty crocker cookbook
    cooking with beans and rice along with about three more books by peggy lenton
    the amazing wheat cookbook by learta moulton
    plus a few more in the stowage unit ..


    plus my wifes and mother cooking 3.-x-.5.sized index cards with complete meals

  12. #12
    Member Chisana's Avatar
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    Cooking Alaskan.

    The New Alaska Cookbook.

    Either the Riversong Lodge Cookbook, a selection of small West Virginia mountain cookbooks I have or Arabesque.

  13. #13

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    As a former commercial fisherman Ive worked with only a HANDFULL of REALLY good cooks,easily the hardest job on any fishing boat,HANDS DOWN.
    Towards the end of my fishing career,I finally decided to give it a try,and actually LOVED IT.
    1.Joy of Cooking: While I dont own a copy of my own(seems like the newer editions arent up to snuff).this is "The Written Word."Outside of watching really good boatcooks,this saved me from lynching and general mutiny many many times.

    2.Cooking Alaskan:my ex made off with my first copy,but I now have my very own again (25% off!)

    3.Internet:cooks.com usually since Im on dial-up(low graphics)

    ak4195

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    Definitely Cooking Alaskan is a must have no matter where you live up here. With limited space on our boat, I usually always have my copy on the boat and if its the only cookbook on board, I'm good to go (unless I want to bake something extravagent, then I need my King Arthur Baking book!)

    The salmon broccoli casserole is wonderful, and if you have a well stocked Alaskan cache, you can come up with all kinds of yummy things from this book during long dark cold winter days!

    I need to get another copy though, cause its at the house now, and I miss it on the boat! Look for it on Amazon, there are lots of cheap used copies.

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    1-800-call-grandma

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    LL Bean
    Betty Crocker
    But the #1 All time best ever is "From the Tules to the Table". Any cookbook that has excerpts from a bathroom wall in Tulelake CA is he bee's knee's.

  17. #17
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    We have 5-6 cook books but seldom ever use them. I like to go off what my mother taught me. If I try something I like at at friends home or party or at work, I just get the recipe. I've always gotten what I wanted. We have some top notch chefs on the slope at my camp that like to hold onto their secrets, but if you continually praise them, write atta boy letters to their bosses, they tend to share secrets. I get a few recipes also from womens magazines that are available when waiting for an appointment somewhere. But mostly, I like to cook by tasting my food as I go along.

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