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Thread: antiseptics

  1. #21
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    For dry skin- a good rule of thumb is to avoid any scented soaps or creams/lotions. As Boneguy mentioned- eucerin is great. So is bag balm (a favorite of some mushers) or plain Vaseline if able to allow it to sit for the night (some people have such problems with dryness they apply gloves at night). My favorite lotions which I use and recommend to patients are Cerave and Sarna- not cheap but worth the money. I also like tea tree oil. Don't forget the biggest thing- stay hydrated!

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by boneguy View Post
    I understood how you planed to use it, but why use anything on a wound that will heal fine all by itself if kept clean and dry? Everybody wants to do something to make things heal quicker/better. Sometimes the best way to make it happen is to do very little. In 40 years I have caused enough harm trying to "DO SOMETHING TO HELP" that the old medical rule of DO NO HARM comes to mind often.
    DENNY
    I once cut my thumb with a folding course toothed hand saw while in the woods gathering material to teach bow and drill fiction fire to students. It was extremely painful after a while and was bleeding quite a bit. I gathered some Yarrow and after chewing it a bit to soften it and release the juices, I placed it on the tumb to stop the bleeding which it did very quickly. However the pain was getting worse and worse. I quickly found some runny spruce pitch and smeared that into the wound. It was quite amazing. within a few minutes, 80 % of teh pain was gone.

    Again another time I stupidly burned my hand by accidentally placing my hand on the muffler of my surface drive boat motor. Extreme pain and I knew a blister or blisters were going to be a result. I immediately placed my hand in the lake water to cool the heat but the lake was surprisingly warm. I then headed into the woods there on the island where we had stopped for a break and searched until I found some spruce pitch from some black spruce. (spruce pitch is good for burns) I smeared that on the burn area. In 5 minutes 50% of the pain was gone and continued to lessen from there. My hand was smeared with pitch and I could not handle anything for fear of getting pitch on it so i stuck a clean piece of paper towel to the pitch and then placed my hand in a glove. worked great. Not only did the pitch lesson and eventually alleviate the pain but there were no resulting blisters and I know that there would have been otherwise due to the extreme level of pain of that burn.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by mountain joe View Post
    I once cut my thumb with a folding course toothed hand saw while in the woods gathering material to teach bow and drill fiction fire to students. It was extremely painful after a while and was bleeding quite a bit. I gathered some Yarrow and after chewing it a bit to soften it and release the juices, I placed it on the tumb to stop the bleeding which it did very quickly. However the pain was getting worse and worse. I quickly found some runny spruce pitch and smeared that into the wound. It was quite amazing. within a few minutes, 80 % of teh pain was gone.

    Again another time I stupidly burned my hand by accidentally placing my hand on the muffler of my surface drive boat motor. Extreme pain and I knew a blister or blisters were going to be a result. I immediately placed my hand in the lake water to cool the heat but the lake was surprisingly warm. I then headed into the woods there on the island where we had stopped for a break and searched until I found some spruce pitch from some black spruce. (spruce pitch is good for burns) I smeared that on the burn area. In 5 minutes 50% of the pain was gone and continued to lessen from there. My hand was smeared with pitch and I could not handle anything for fear of getting pitch on it so i stuck a clean piece of paper towel to the pitch and then placed my hand in a glove. worked great. Not only did the pitch lesson and eventually alleviate the pain but there were no resulting blisters and I know that there would have been otherwise due to the extreme level of pain of that burn.

    The fact of the matter is that mankind has been using natural remedies since he first got hurt or sick. And we're still here. When I think of all the toxic chemicals that modern medicine is putting into people's bodies to "heal" them, well, that's when I personally think "First do no harm"....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    The fact of the matter is that mankind has been using natural remedies since he first got hurt or sick. And we're still here. When I think of all the toxic chemicals that modern medicine is putting into people's bodies to "heal" them, well, that's when I personally think "First do no harm"....
    One of my favorite remedies to use for injuries that do not have an open wound (sprains, bruises, etc) is Arnica. Decreases swelling and bruising dramatically. Aloe vera is superb for burns. Sugar stops bleeding quickly- learned that in the Dominican Republic 40 years ago. Tea made with lemon balm or verbina is very calming and ginger settles stomachs well. Lots of room for natural remedies and yet people assume that they are all safe since they are 'natural'. Alaska has many plants that have healing properties and others that are very harmful. Some have tendencies to cause bleeding and many interact with medications so it is good to either talk with pharmacist or do your own research. When people tout the 'its natural so its safe', I like to remind them that curare and cyanide are natural too! I was fortunate to be in Venezuela years ago and spent time with locals- I observed curare used in blowguns to get monkeys. We use paralytics in modern medicine but it evolved from curare. There are paralytic plants even in Alaska. Merry Christmas everyone and stay safe.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKBEE View Post
    .....Alaska has many plants that have healing properties and others that are very harmful....
    Reminds me of that poor kid that they ended up making the movie after....."Into the Wild".

    For years I've wanted to eat Alaskan mushrooms too, but just don't know enough about them. Gotta get a book someday....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    Reminds me of that poor kid that they ended up making the movie after....."Into the Wild".

    For years I've wanted to eat Alaskan mushrooms too, but just don't know enough about them. Gotta get a book someday....
    I bought a book on mushrooms here and could not believe how many kinds there are! The intriguing ones are edible and supposedly tasty but make you very sick with GI upset if drinking alcohol within 48 hrs. I have had people stop by my home in Anchorage in the late summer asking to pick mushrooms and I let them because I am a chicken to eat something I am not sure of!!! Growing up in Latin America I will eat pretty much anything that comes from the ocean, most anything that walks or can fly (have tried some I couldn't stomach), but unknown plants are scary.

    I had planned on taking a winter survival class when I moved here from a guy out of Tok. His wife taught the portion covering medicinal/edible and poisonous plants. He unfortunately was called to duty teaching our finest military and then passed away before I could take a class. I am amazed by healing abilities of tinctures and still use some Chinese concoctions for joint injuries and muscle stiffness. Lots of good stuff in nature!

  7. #27
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    +1 on bag balm...messy...yes but it does work well for me.

    I carry peroxide in my vehicles and use that along with betadine to wash wounds. Roger that on "self stitches" and my Lab didn't like me sewing him up either. Staples hurt too but don't take as long to apply...just a thought.
    Somewhere along the way I have lost the ability to act politically correct. If you should find it, please feel free to keep it.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    One thing I do have to do or suffer with otherwise is.... I have dry skin anyway, and in the winter it only gets worse. So much so that, because I use my hands so much at work, that the tips of my fingers start cracking badly. I have to apply Neo and a bandages to the cracks at night or they will only get worse and take forever to heal...and you know how sore and painful fingertips can be. I haven't found a skin lotion yet that can keep this from happening (any suggestions?) Neo helps heal them in a few days, but I have to really stay on top of it.
    crackzapit.com

    Works great for them winter time bloody hangnails. Or get it through Duluth Trading, Amazon and Tru-value. Maybe not the one in Willow, though....

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKBEE View Post
    One of my favorite remedies to use for injuries that do not have an open wound (sprains, bruises, etc) is Arnica. Decreases swelling and bruising dramatically. Aloe vera is superb for burns. Sugar stops bleeding quickly- learned that in the Dominican Republic 40 years ago. Tea made with lemon balm or verbina is very calming and ginger settles stomachs well. Lots of room for natural remedies and yet people assume that they are all safe since they are 'natural'. Alaska has many plants that have healing properties and others that are very harmful. Some have tendencies to cause bleeding and many interact with medications so it is good to either talk with pharmacist or do your own research. When people tout the 'its natural so its safe', I like to remind them that curare and cyanide are natural too! I was fortunate to be in Venezuela years ago and spent time with locals- I observed curare used in blowguns to get monkeys. We use paralytics in modern medicine but it evolved from curare. There are paralytic plants even in Alaska. Merry Christmas everyone and stay safe.
    Yeah no kidding, water hemlock is natural and grows here....

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by 8x57 Mauser View Post
    A 7-day course of Erythromycin? Hadn't heard about that. Do you maybe mean Azithromycin (Zithromax)? It's a good idea.

    When I can get my hands on it, I'm a big fan of Mupirocin (Bactroban) -- while it's applied topically, it penetrates far better than most topical antibiotics. It's the sort of thing that can be used topically, but is also very useful for wound care if you've managed to get one deep enough to need a closure, but not so deep as to require systemic antibiotics.
    Sounds like he meant azithromycin but erythromycin is an abx. My question is what provider is writing the scripts and what do they say... "for the possible hypothetical infection of x,y, and z..."?

  11. #31

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    I just noticed this thread again. I buy all of my antibiotics from online aquarium supply houses.
    Quote Originally Posted by Troy Sharp View Post
    Sounds like he meant azithromycin but erythromycin is an abx. My question is what provider is writing the scripts and what do they say... "for the possible hypothetical infection of x,y, and z..."?
    Sent from my Moto G (5) Plus using Tapatalk

  12. #32
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    Be careful of Cipro, some people are allergic to this, ie. me, it caused lack of muscle strength after taking it, I had to be helped up from sitting position after a couple days dosage. It is strong medicine, and can affect people differently. I had a UTI in Alaska at my cabin, glad I had friends there to help get out. After Surgery to repair my broken Clavicle in April, the Dr. said "Just keep it clean, do not put anything on it." It healed just fine. I normally put Neosporin on small cuts, they heal in about a week.

  13. #33

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    There's also been many cases of Achilles tendon ruptures after taking it. I only carry augmentin, which is amoxicillin and an adjunct.
    Quote Originally Posted by Gerberman View Post
    Be careful of Cipro, some people are allergic to this, ie. me, it caused lack of muscle strength after taking it, I had to be helped up from sitting position after a couple days dosage. It is strong medicine, and can affect people differently. I had a UTI in Alaska at my cabin, glad I had friends there to help get out. After Surgery to repair my broken Clavicle in April, the Dr. said "Just keep it clean, do not put anything on it." It healed just fine. I normally put Neosporin on small cuts, they heal in about a week.
    Sent from my Moto G (5) Plus using Tapatalk

  14. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by springer View Post
    There's also been many cases of Achilles tendon ruptures after taking it. I only carry augmentin, which is amoxicillin and an adjunct.

    Sent from my Moto G (5) Plus using Tapatalk
    The quinolones can definitely cause issues with tendons (not just Achilles but they seem to be most common). They are great medication when needed and still what I like for pyelonephritis and pneumonia that has not responded to Augmentin, but I do so cautiously. Stay well hydrated if taking them.

    Augmentin is my favorite for serious sinusitis, strep, otitis media, severe bronchitis, most bites (human included), and lots of skin infections. Expect some lose stools and take it with food. Y'all stay safe.

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