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Thread: antiseptics

  1. #1
    Member BucknRut's Avatar
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    Default antiseptics

    I have the little towellette type in my kit, but I’m not sure they are the best option.

    What type of antiseptics do you carry?

    Oh yeah, I also have Neosporin packets in there as well.
    Last edited by BucknRut; 12-02-2006 at 16:55. Reason: add too

  2. #2
    Member AlaskaHippie's Avatar
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    Default

    I'm very fortunate to have a wife who is a Trauma Nurse, our multiple first aid kits ROCK!

    I carry in the "pocket size" kit a number of individually packaged Betadyne Wipes, along with Alcohol Wipes, the bigger kits have small vials of the actual liquids. While on the topic of sterility I also make sure EVERY kit has at least one set of vacuum selaed latex gloves (more sets for the larger "camp" kits).
    Somewhere on this computer we have inventories for our respective kits, so we can checklist 'em each time a new season requires a different set of kits to be pulled out of storage. I do know that every kit has different sizes of packaged gauze, derma-bond, butterfly dressings and at least tylenol with codeine.
    “Life has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously.” ― H.S.T.
    "Character is how you treat those who can do nothing for you."

  3. #3
    New member mtcop71's Avatar
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    Default Just Pills

    I carry a few betadine wipes, but what I think most importantly then anteseptic wipes is antibiotcs. I take 7 Erythrimiacin (Z-Pack), protects against infections from the waist up. If you want to get even more technical, you can also get Ciproxin as well.

  4. #4
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    Vodka. Antiseptic and anesthetic. Multi-tasking is good.

  5. #5

    Default BZK and Betadyne

    I always have some Benzalkonium Chloride in my kit, along with Betadyne. The BZK is great on open wounds, and in case one of the party is sensitive to shellfish, as the Betadyne could cause a reaction. Same price, usually.

    Cipro is a good idea, too. A strong antibiotic may save a life if isolated for a while. I have a list somewhere in my disorganised mess of a computer with decent lists for a personal, small group, and expedition kit. If I can locate it, I will post it up!!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wildmed View Post
    I always have some Benzalkonium Chloride in my kit, along with Betadyne. The BZK is great on open wounds, and in case one of the party is sensitive to shellfish, as the Betadyne could cause a reaction. Same price, usually.

    Cipro is a good idea, too. A strong antibiotic may save a life if isolated for a while. I have a list somewhere in my disorganised mess of a computer with decent lists for a personal, small group, and expedition kit. If I can locate it, I will post it up!!

    Welcome to the forums Wildmed. That would be great to have those lists posted here.

    Perry
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and don’t have one, you’ll probably never need one again

  7. #7

    Default antiseptics

    I use a solution that I make with iodine based water treatment tablets.

  8. #8
    Member 8x57 Mauser's Avatar
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    Default Azithromycin

    Quote Originally Posted by mtcop71 View Post
    ... I take 7 Erythrimiacin (Z-Pack), protects against infections from the waist up. If you want to get even more technical, you can also get Ciproxin as well.
    A 7-day course of Erythromycin? Hadn't heard about that. Do you maybe mean Azithromycin (Zithromax)? It's a good idea.

    When I can get my hands on it, I'm a big fan of Mupirocin (Bactroban) -- while it's applied topically, it penetrates far better than most topical antibiotics. It's the sort of thing that can be used topically, but is also very useful for wound care if you've managed to get one deep enough to need a closure, but not so deep as to require systemic antibiotics.

  9. #9

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    Spruce pitch is a powerful antiseptic. Not only is it effective at stopping or preventing infection but it also helps ease the pain, some times considerably. Usnea lichen is also very antiseptic. The lichen can be rubbed between fingers to release a powder that can be sprinkled on a wound. Sphagnum moss is also antiseptic as well as many other plants. Many plants can be simmered to make a decoction which can be used as an antiseptic wound wash. Many plants can be heated in water and then used as a poultice to aid in reducing infection as well as to assist healing.

  10. #10

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    I don't know why but I have see a fair number of allergic reactions to Neosporin. I usually recommend just cleaning wounds with soap and water, Betadine is also good. Once clean keep the wound clean and dry. Bacitracin if you feel the need for a cream. Sometimes less is better. Do not superglue hand wounds closed in the field!! For travel overseas Cipro would be my first drug of choice.
    DENNY

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    I like betadine but people tend to forget it actually cleans as it dries. Hibiclens (chlorhexidine) is nice to carry and IMHO is better for facial wounds as it does not cause any excoriation. If you are thinking of carrying antibiotics- bear in mind carrying them for what you think may be the issue in advance. Many have pretty broad coverage while some are very specific. Azithromycin as previously mentioned is great for respiratory and mild ENT infections, but not great for skin infections. I carry Augmentin as it is good for most respiratory and ENT infections as well as very good coverage for many skin wound infections including most bite wounds (not necessarily what is carried in the teeth of the animal). I won't try to hijack the thread with antibiotic coverage! As a provider I carry way more than likely needed for the just in case scenarios, but as was mentioned, keeping wounds clean and dry is paramount. Lots of people try to close wounds with sutures or staples that would be better left irrigated with clean water/soap and covered with a good dressing- and they develop worse problems. I have closed wounds in the field but only selectively and yes I carry sutures, stapler, and also lidocaine with syringes for irrigation and injection. (regardless of Rambo- sutures without local anesthesia hurts! I had to do it to myself once and it friggin hurts!!) Bactroban as previously mentioned is especially handy if the wound is expected to have MRSA. Stay safe!

  12. #12
    Member kobuk's Avatar
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    Default

    When you mention using soap and water, could you explain more for me. What type of soap? Dish soap, hand, soft soap? Also, how much soap to water? I usually have some soap around while out hunting, fishing. Do you make some in a tub and soak or pour over the wound? How often do you do this process, just at the first while cleaning or go back and reapply every once in a while. I thought neosporin was the magic salve! It seems to work pretty well but I haven't used it on a deep large wound.

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Default

    Look up "wormwood tincture" Wormwood is fantastic stuff...!!!
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  14. #14

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    Basically any type of soap will do. Wash until wound and all area around the wound is clean, rinse wound a couple of times with clean water, apply dressing and pressure for a while. Just keep clean and dry. The clot that forms will protect the wound just fine. If you have a cut on you hand in the field it will get dirty so just wash up like you normally would. Put dressing on and repeat as needed. Using a salve to keep a wound moist may help with improving the scar, and keep dressing from sticking to the wound, but it may also delay healing a bit. Neosporin is a great antibiotic. But you normally don't need it and like I said I have see a fair number of allergic type reactions (redness, swelling, rash) that looks like the wound may be getting infected, so it complicates things. I have not seen the same reaction with Bacitracin ointment, so if you feel the need to put stuff on a wound that is what I would use. Bacitracin is what I would use on say a facial laceration that I was worried about the scar. The human body will heal most things just fine without any help other than to get parts kind of close together. Most creams, lotions, potions, or uncle Johns stem cell injections do little to nothing as far as healing go's. I was in the medical field for 40 years and worked several different fields. Some did completely opposite care of wounds as others did. When I would ask why they did it that way the answer was usually "that is how I was trained" !! All the patients did fine. Wounds healed scar looked the same. What I learned is the body will heal fine whatever I did so I figured the less I screw with it the better it will be.
    I agree with AKBEE, I would be very selective closing a wound in the field. You can always fix a scar when you get back home.
    DENNY

  15. #15

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    Wormwood TincturePotential Early Health Issues

    Pregnant women should not take wormwood as it is a uterine stimulant & could cause complications including abortion. Children should not be given wormwood, which also means nursing mothers should not take it.

    Gots to read the fine print.
    DENNY

  16. #16
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by boneguy View Post
    Wormwood TincturePotential Early Health Issues

    Pregnant women should not take wormwood as it is a uterine stimulant & could cause complications including abortion. Children should not be given wormwood, which also means nursing mothers should not take it.

    Gots to read the fine print.
    DENNY
    Yeah, and most medical doctors don't agree with many Nutritionists either........but they're learning. Oh and btw, I wasn't talking about taking wormwood internally, which even though you can, you definitely need to know what you're doing. I was talking about making the wormwood tincture and using it topically as you would Neosporin.....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    Look up "wormwood tincture" Wormwood is fantastic stuff...!!!
    Wormwood is also a natural mosquito repellent. I spoke with a lady who was a Christian missionary in Africa who said that they use an Artemisia (Wormwood is an Artemisia) as an effective cure for Malaria there.

  18. #18

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    I understood how you planed to use it, but why use anything on a wound that will heal fine all by itself if kept clean and dry? Everybody wants to do something to make things heal quicker/better. Sometimes the best way to make it happen is to do very little. In 40 years I have caused enough harm trying to "DO SOMETHING TO HELP" that the old medical rule of DO NO HARM comes to mind often.
    DENNY

  19. #19
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by boneguy View Post
    I understood how you planed to use it, but why use anything on a wound that will heal fine all by itself if kept clean and dry? Everybody wants to do something to make things heal quicker/better. Sometimes the best way to make it happen is to do very little. In 40 years I have caused enough harm trying to "DO SOMETHING TO HELP" that the old medical rule of DO NO HARM comes to mind often.
    DENNY
    As I'm sure you know, is some cases it can be difficult to keep wounds clean and dry......say in a jungle, or rainforest. And if you can't be close to medical attention then an infection could mean a death sentence there. Yes, however, I agree with doing nothing else in most cases. I rarely put anything on most of my cuts and scrapes. I haven't made the wormwood tincture but have read about it and know someone that has made and uses it and, in his words, said "Neosporin's got nothing on this stuff".

    One thing I do have to do or suffer with otherwise is.... I have dry skin anyway, and in the winter it only gets worse. So much so that, because I use my hands so much at work, that the tips of my fingers start cracking badly. I have to apply Neo and a bandages to the cracks at night or they will only get worse and take forever to heal...and you know how sore and painful fingertips can be. I haven't found a skin lotion yet that can keep this from happening (any suggestions?) Neo helps heal them in a few days, but I have to really stay on top of it.

    The only time I had a problem with Neo was when I used it for too long (where I shouldn't have) and it irritated the skin around the wound pretty bad.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  20. #20

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    I like Eucerin cream. It is old school over the counter stuff, not cheap, but you can find it in 16oz tubs, still pretty common just call local pharmacy. It takes a while to soak in so the first 1/2 hour it is like having axle grease on you hands. Works great for everyday use, no steroid side effects, You can apply 3 or more times a day as needed.
    DENNY

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