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Thread: What kind of salt?

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    Member tccak71's Avatar
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    Default What kind of salt?

    What kind of salt do I need for a bear hide in the field and where do I get it?


    Thanks,
    Tim

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    Non-iodized table salt. I bought it in 25 pound sacks at Costco for something like 4.95 a bag. Carr's had 3 pound boxes.

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    Canning and pickling salt is what we use if we can not find large bags of non-iodized salt. It is usually available in 4-5 lb. boxes at Safeway or Fred Meyer. Your taxidermist should be able to hook you up with salt also.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chisana View Post
    Your taxidermist should be able to hook you up with salt also.
    I thought asking for 25lbs may be excessive. $5/bag seems cheap. Will it be labeled as non-iodized or Table Salt?

    Tim

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    Tim, 25 lbs is alot for in the field but drop me a line later this week. my wife is picking up quite a few bags of salt. I'll give ya some. I'm in anchorage.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tccak71 View Post
    I thought asking for 25lbs may be excessive. $5/bag seems cheap. Will it be labeled as non-iodized or Table Salt?

    Tim
    25lb barely and i mean BARELY did the 6 foot blackie after heads and feets were out... sure could of had another 10 lb or so...
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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    Default Salt

    Go to feed stores they have hay and stock salt in large bags 50# bag was 7and change. It's very fine and rubs in well, for the most part while in the field if the weather is cool you only need enough salt for one application IF you have it fleshed out good. Otherwise salt will not get through the meat and fat to the hair follicle and you will be wasting time and salt. 10# will work for most animals brown bears being the exception and of course life size hides.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tccak71 View Post
    What kind of salt do I need for a bear hide in the field and where do I get it?
    Thanks,
    Tim
    Table salt works fine - either iodized or not - doesn't matter. For larger brown bears, 9'6" plus, about 50 pounds for two saltings about 30 for the first and 20 for the second.
    They need to be well fleshed, toes and lips and ears etc. turned.
    Good luck
    Joe (Ak)

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    Just keep in mind that the salt will not penetrate fat. The hide must be fleshed well before the salt can do its work.
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    Blink: I thought 25lbs was a lot too, that's what Larry Bartlett recommended this on his Wilderness Taxidermy video. He showed how to get 14lbs into a milk jug, so I'm hoping to take two milk jugs; hope it works. Thanks for the offer too. I'm real close to Sam's and Costco so I don't mind picking up a sack.

    I haven't ever been on one bear kill at all so when I say I'm new to this, I mean really new, green actually! I'm hoping to flesh the heck out of it and salt it good once; twice if I have time. After watching Wilderness Taxidermy, I honestly figure it may take me 1 to 2 days to flesh and turn parts after I get the hide to camp. My buddy has killed one black bear and got the hide off and began fleshing but didn't turn anything. I'm hoping to shoot a good representative of the species; maybe a 7 footer or so.

    What do I do if its raining or snowing and I can't flesh the hide without getting it soaking wet? Can I put it in a contractor's trash bag and submerge it until it lets up? How much harder will the hide be to flesh if it isn't as malleable?

    Tim

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    Default ears and lips

    Do not salt the head until you have turned the ears and split the lips and eyes and fleshed off the meat and skinned the nose out.

    Some Taxidermists will not accept a hide that has been salted before being properly fleshed out first .....

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    Quote Originally Posted by tccak71 View Post
    Blink: I thought 25lbs was a lot too, that's what Larry Bartlett recommended this on his Wilderness Taxidermy video. He showed how to get 14lbs into a milk jug, so I'm hoping to take two milk jugs; hope it works. Thanks for the offer too. I'm real close to Sam's and Costco so I don't mind picking up a sack.

    I haven't ever been on one bear kill at all so when I say I'm new to this, I mean really new, green actually! I'm hoping to flesh the heck out of it and salt it good once; twice if I have time. After watching Wilderness Taxidermy, I honestly figure it may take me 1 to 2 days to flesh and turn parts after I get the hide to camp. My buddy has killed one black bear and got the hide off and began fleshing but didn't turn anything. I'm hoping to shoot a good representative of the species; maybe a 7 footer or so.

    What do I do if its raining or snowing and I can't flesh the hide without getting it soaking wet? Can I put it in a contractor's trash bag and submerge it until it lets up? How much harder will the hide be to flesh if it isn't as malleable?

    Tim

    no tim... hang it...all stretched out over a log and T- pee a small tarp to keep the water off. it is COLD enough now that heat issues are unlikely.

    mine went over a week before i go it in this fall.. and my moose hung 15 days, with out any problem. Daniel and i fleshed for 2.5 days working on feet ears and lips etc as we took a break from moose shooting. i salted it before packing it into a game bag for the trip home. it did have to ride in a large packer part of the trip due to the muddy trail condt but t was removed as soon as it got to the truck.

    Charlie looked it over when i gave it to him and no problems at all.


    some tips?


    this was my first fall bear since 92, talk about Fat! FAT FAT

    take your time skinning. get as close to the skin as you can, holes can be sewn, i did mine under a flood light after skinning a moose and i left too much fat on the hide and it caused considerable grief fleshing.. careful around the edges that you make you cuts on, as they stack up the fat the most and are hardest to remove it from...

    a good curved blade for slimming the fat off, i would scrape and scrape and just pull the juice out on the edge of my Ulu...

    have a good sharpener,,,, it ate up all my edges
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    A 7 foot black bear is representative of the species? That would be a great bear and bigger than norm. Vince gave you some good advice. I got a 6 1/2 foot interiior grizzly and it took 2 days to get the head and paws out, trim off the fat (and yes we tried to minimize while skinning) and turn the ears, lips, nose etc. And that was in my garage. Taking the fat off the hide dulls knives faster than anything else and you need to get it all off before you salt. Salting the fat does nothing.
    If its raining or snowing, put it in a game bag and hang it under a tarp. Come home and work on it as long as its not days. Give me a call, and I'll give you a hand.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tccak71 View Post
    Blink: I thought 25lbs was a lot too, that's what Larry Bartlett recommended this on his Wilderness Taxidermy video. He showed how to get 14lbs into a milk jug, so I'm hoping to take two milk jugs; hope it works. Thanks for the offer too. I'm real close to Sam's and Costco so I don't mind picking up a sack.

    I haven't ever been on one bear kill at all so when I say I'm new to this, I mean really new, green actually! I'm hoping to flesh the heck out of it and salt it good once; twice if I have time. After watching Wilderness Taxidermy, I honestly figure it may take me 1 to 2 days to flesh and turn parts after I get the hide to camp. My buddy has killed one black bear and got the hide off and began fleshing but didn't turn anything. I'm hoping to shoot a good representative of the species; maybe a 7 footer or so.

    What do I do if its raining or snowing and I can't flesh the hide without getting it soaking wet? Can I put it in a contractor's trash bag and submerge it until it lets up? How much harder will the hide be to flesh if it isn't as malleable?

    Tim
    Stop by a taxidermist shop. Most are more than happy to show how to turn toes; ears; lips etc. If not - an you're in Fairbanks, I'll be happy to help.
    Joe (Ak)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill S. View Post
    A 7 foot black bear is representative of the species? That would be a great bear and bigger than norm. Vince gave you some good advice. I got a a 6 1/2 foot interiior grizzly and it took 2 days to get the head and paws out, trim off the fat (and yes we tried to minimize while skinning) and turn the ears, lips, nose etc. And that was in my garage. Taking the fat off the hide dulls knives faster than anything else and you need to get it all off before you salt. Salting the fat does nothing.
    If its raining or snowing, put it in a game bag and hang it under a tarp. Come home and work on it as long as its not days. Give me a call, and I'll give you a hand.
    I guess I should clarify...7 foot brown/grizz I was trying to frame a reference for the amount of salt as Want had mentioned 50lbs for a 9'6" grizz for two saltings.


    Quote Originally Posted by wantj43 View Post
    Stop by a taxidermist shop. Most are more than happy to show how to turn toes; ears; lips etc. If not - an you're in Fairbanks, I'll be happy to help.
    Joe (Ak)
    Mighty generous of you fellas! I'm in Anchorage, Bill, I see you're in ER. I may take you up on that so someone who knows something can help me out or at least look at it before it goes to the taxidermist!

    I'm getting the impression that if I have "favorable" weather conditions like Vince said, that the hide will "keep" better in the field and that I may NOT have to flesh and turn lips, ears, toes, etc... until I get home? Is that correct? If this is true, I'd rather do the fleshing and turning at home versus in the field, but I don't want the hide to rot or hair to slip, etc. I'm assuming that when I get it to camp I'm leaving the feet & head attached until I get them out. How does that play into the fleshing/caping senario? If its cold (30-40 F) am I ok for a few days? I'm assuming that if I get a bear on Montague my deer hunt is over do to fleshing chores-unless its raining/snowing and I can't do anything with it. Under cold conditions, will the hide "keep" for 5-7 days until I get back, assuming I don't shoot a bear opening morning?

    I'm am wondering about submerging deer meat and a bear hide in the creek too. I'm afraid that scavenger birds and squirrels would have a hay-day if i just left the (deer) meat on a meat pole (covered with a tarp) instead of in the creek.

    Vince, I like your idea of laying out the hide and teepee-ing it, but how do I keep out scavengers? Ideally, do I want to lay it flat (hide-down?) or roll it up until I can get to fleshing chores in the field? I'm assuming that I'd want it flat to dry out, but not if it isn't properly fleshed/caped & salted.

    Thanks for the help and ideas; keep the tips coming!!! I'd rather not screw this up!

    Tim

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    Quote Originally Posted by tccak71 View Post
    I guess I should clarify...7 foot brown/grizz I was trying to frame a reference for the amount of salt as Want had mentioned 50lbs for a 9'6" grizz for two saltings.




    Mighty generous of you fellas! I'm in Anchorage, Bill, I see you're in ER. I may take you up on that so someone who knows something can help me out or at least look at it before it goes to the taxidermist!

    I'm getting the impression that if I have "favorable" weather conditions like Vince said, that the hide will "keep" better in the field and that I may NOT have to flesh and turn lips, ears, toes, etc... until I get home? Is that correct? If this is true, I'd rather do the fleshing and turning at home versus in the field, but I don't want the hide to rot or hair to slip, etc. I'm assuming that when I get it to camp I'm leaving the feet & head attached until I get them out. How does that play into the fleshing/caping senario? If its cold (30-40 F) am I ok for a few days? I'm assuming that if I get a bear on Montague my deer hunt is over do to fleshing chores-unless its raining/snowing and I can't do anything with it. Under cold conditions, will the hide "keep" for 5-7 days until I get back, assuming I don't shoot a bear opening morning?

    I'm am wondering about submerging deer meat and a bear hide in the creek too. I'm afraid that scavenger birds and squirrels would have a hay-day if i just left the (deer) meat on a meat pole (covered with a tarp) instead of in the creek.

    Vince, I like your idea of laying out the hide and teepee-ing it, but how do I keep out scavengers? Ideally, do I want to lay it flat (hide-down?) or roll it up until I can get to fleshing chores in the field? I'm assuming that I'd want it flat to dry out, but not if it isn't properly fleshed/caped & salted.

    Thanks for the help and ideas; keep the tips coming!!! I'd rather not screw this up!

    Tim

    Tim the reason for hanging it ( flesh out ) is to cool it and allow the skin to dry some... i would try to get the head and paws out soon! not wait if you can.

    get to fleshing on it right away. you will be sitting around camp anyway. unless you are immediately on your way home.

    over the years mine have all been sealed with in 24 hours and dropped off. this year i had it a week before we made it to the sealing, and taxi..

    keep it cool... keep it cool..... KEEP IT COOL.... laying the hide out unrolled COOLS IT keeping meat and fats from souring TOO fast.

    roll it too soon and you just wrapped a steak in a fur coat with bacon grease all over it... ( get my drift ?) I will not Roll them until i am ready to transport them...


    we stretched a line in a tarp tent this fall and hung the hide full length (nose / tail) like a clothes line...

    DO NOT expect to be able to wait...
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vince View Post
    Tim the reason for hanging it ( flesh out ) is to cool it and allow the skin to dry some... i would try to get the head and paws out soon! not wait if you can.

    get to fleshing on it right away. you will be sitting around camp anyway. unless you are immediately on your way home.

    over the years mine have all been sealed with in 24 hours and dropped off. this year i had it a week before we made it to the sealing, and taxi..

    keep it cool... keep it cool..... KEEP IT COOL.... laying the hide out unrolled COOLS IT keeping meat and fats from souring TOO fast.

    roll it too soon and you just wrapped a steak in a fur coat with bacon grease all over it... ( get my drift ?) I will not Roll them until i am ready to transport them...


    we stretched a line in a tarp tent this fall and hung the hide full length (nose / tail) like a clothes line...

    DO NOT expect to be able to wait...
    Ok, I get it. I thought you were saying that you waited a week before fleshing it at home w/Daniel. Ok. I think I can manage getting that stuff done. Hope the weather goes my way too.

    Tim

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    Quote Originally Posted by tccak71 View Post
    I guess I should clarify...7 foot brown/grizz I was trying to frame a reference for the amount of salt as Want had mentioned 50lbs for a 9'6" grizz for two saltings.

    I'm am wondering about submerging deer meat and a bear hide in the creek too. I'm afraid that scavenger birds and squirrels would have a hay-day if i just left the (deer) meat on a meat pole (covered with a tarp) instead of in the creek.

    Tim
    About "submerging" hide in creek - did that once (in the lagoon) - it sure was heavy, took a week to get the hair dry, but it sure was clean, but NEVER again.
    Keep it cool, learn to turn toes and flesh etc. before going to the field. Can be kept cooler by unrolling at night, then re-rolling during the day, fur side out. In general best to lay fur side down to keep hide side clean.
    Good luck
    Joe (Ak)

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    Quote Originally Posted by wantj43 View Post
    About "submerging" hide in creek - did that once (in the lagoon) - it sure was heavy, took a week to get the hair dry, but it sure was clean, but NEVER again.
    Keep it cool, learn to turn toes and flesh etc. before going to the field. Can be kept cooler by unrolling at night, then re-rolling during the day, fur side out. In general best to lay fur side down to keep hide side clean.
    Good luck
    Joe (Ak)
    Thanks for the advice. I don't think too many hunters must submerge their hides/meat. I'd only do it as a last resort. I wish I'd contacted my taxidermist two months ago instead of the last minute. I've learned that properly skinning/fleshing/caping a bear isn't the same as cutting-up a moose just to take the meat and antlers! There seems to be a lot of detailed work involved.

    Tim

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    Quote Originally Posted by tccak71 View Post
    I thought asking for 25lbs may be excessive. $5/bag seems cheap. Will it be labeled as non-iodized or Table Salt?

    Tim
    Hello, new to forum how are yall? I am a taxidermist and own a tannery you can use non iodized salt the finest grain available

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