Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Installing a recoil pad

  1. #1

    Default Installing a recoil pad

    I'm getting ready to install a Limbsaver on my Win 70. This will be my first attempt. I'm pretty sure i can get it to fit etc but should i use some type of glue or adhesive ( if so what kind ) or will the screws be enough. Thanks

  2. #2
    Member moses42ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Peters Creek
    Posts
    202

    Default

    If you have Loc Tite go ahead and use it if not I wouldn't worry about it. I haven't used any and have not had any problems. Just make sure the screws are tight.

  3. #3
    Member gunbugs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    1,382

    Default

    The screws are typically plenty good enough to hold the pad to the stock. However, you didn't mention if the stock is wood, plastic, or synthetic.

  4. #4

    Default

    I picked one up for a wood stock savage 110 7mm, and the holes didnt line up..neither did they line up for a ruger 270 ultralight. I ended up returning them as I sold the ruger..and the savage I just dont shoot. That said, is the base plate on the pad drillable? And then whats the best way to take off the excess pad as there is a little bit of over hang? Or do I drill the back of the rifle out and run new screws?

  5. #5

    Default

    It's a wood stock model 70

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SwampView AK, Overlooking Mt. Mckinley and Points Beyond.
    Posts
    8,810

    Default

    If you can get a Limbsaver to fit your Mdl 70, fine, but if it's "grind to fit", I wouldn't risk it.

    I had two of them installed, and they got sticky. I later heard if they are heated up, from the grinding, they do that. (I have a slip-on Limbsaver that is fine.)

    I just had the one, that was the worst, replaced with a pachmayer decelerator. I have a decelerator on another rifle too. That is a better choice than a Limbsaver IMO.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  7. #7
    Member gunbugs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    1,382

    Default

    The best thing to do is plug the old holes in the stock. Drill them out and epoxy dowels in the holes. Then use a table mounted disc or belt sander to flatten both the butt of the stock and the back of the pad. Now hold the pad to the rear of the stock in the position you want to mount it. Take a minute to think about the angles and surfaces you'll be sanding. Then mark the position of the screws to the butt. I usually do this by putting the screws in the pad and tapping the heads with a small hammer so the points mark the butt of the stock. Then pencil a line down the center of the butt from top to bottom and adjust the placement of your screw marks and typically drill your new holes with a 1/8" drill bit. Now screw the pad to the stock and scribe a line from the stock to the pad. Remove the pad. Usually use 120 grit for the initial sanding of the contour of the pad. 1750 rpm will do a good job on most pads. Be sure to use a fresh disc or belt, it will cut a better line and not heat the pad with too much friction. Always keep the pad moving when you are sanding, it will keep you from taking off too much material, and use a light pressure, let the tool do the work. Be sure to tip the pad to the correct angle when sanding the bottom, toe half to follow the toe angle. The B-square jig is excellent for this part of the job. It can be done with the pad screwed to a wooden block as well or even freehand but that requires some practice and skill to produce a professional looking job. Sand till you actually hit your scribed line. Once you are done sanding down to the scribed line, screw the pad to the stock and use a narrow pillar file to clean up the edge and bring the contour down to the wood. A layer of masking tape is required on the wood to keep the file from marring things up. You can then final finish the base of the pad to whatever grit pleases you. Seal the exposed grain under the pad with verathane or some other sealer and shoot the pad with some silicone lube and wipe with a rag to clean it up and you're done. Have done hundreds of pads with factory finish results this way. Hope this helps! Good luck! (GUNBUGS)

  8. #8

    Default

    Everything Gunbugs said plus freezing the recoil pad before sand from scrib line to final sanding makes them turn out much smoother. They thaw quick so I don't get in a hurry I think it took four or five days to do the last one I did. I have waited until the temp drops below zero and left them out over night it gives you a few more minutes of work time.

    I always wondered if the smiths that install a lot of them used their cryo tanks to freeze them before they final finshed them.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •