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Thread: yes guts, yes

  1. #1
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    Default yes guts, yes

    Hey, Nukalpaiq, gotta share you this, My favorite "After Fall Bull Hunting Dinner"

    Boil the intestinal sack stuffed with intestinal fats, the tounge, the Heart, and the rumenents sack we call "Bible"


    Cook for a long time together, slow aod low.

    Take out and chop up the Tounge and Heart, return them to the broth and add speghetti noodles and garlic.
    Awsome!!

    Chop up the boiled intestinal sack and the Bible with all the moss thats been cook'd in all tatsey and spiced Mmmmmmmmmmm............!!!!! and use a fork.

    I use a fork to poke the kids' hands with untill they gettheir own bowl....~~LOL!!~~
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    Member Nukalpiaq's Avatar
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    strangerinastrangeland,
    What happened to the kidneys, did you eat them raw, warm and fresh, right out of the moose like hunters do here?. The bible looks like tripe, everyone here really likes to eat moose tripe too, sometimes raw but most of the time cooked, cut up, then dipped in seal oil. Your meal of organs, looks like good eating. Would bring a big smile to many a hunter's face after a day out in the field.
    Do you also gather all the stomach fat and dry it, then use it as a snack food when drinking tea or coffee? Bet you also cut the leg bones up with the marrow in the center, then make a big pot of moose bone soup like we do here too. Man I am getting hungry just thinking about all of those tasty delicacies.

  3. #3
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    I do with Caribou all that you fellas do with Moose.
    We crack the bones for marrow,boil 'em and chew the ends ....though we eat the kidneys fresh in Winter , we just gave all them to our bud Rodger, who eats them like peaches

    The stomach fats are stuffed into the intestinal "termanus" by the rumenants bag, in the fall catch.Theres a peticular tatse that is very plesant in both the Bible and the fats, especially when bboiled and cooled together.
    In a way its tripe, being a stomach appendage and all , and we eat that appendage but we leave the moss's the Caribou chewed up in there and cook that as well. Amalik........maby a Moose dosent chew their forage up enough? Although theres ALOT of Moose around very few are caught, mostly because theres lotsa Caribou......
    We dry caribou stomach fats and smnoke them with our meats, and eat them with tea or coffee Mmmmmmmmm
    Were on the same page, just different names for the same stuff~~LOL!!~~
    I'm thinking you and I coule easily get fat at each other table
    ONE big difference, here, is that we use Caribou Fat from these fall Bulls for our Akutuk. NO Crisco, nope, no way, not here ~~LOL!!~~.

    Whats really funny is that I take pictues of this stuff ~~LOLOLOLOLOL!!!~~
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    strangerinastrangeland,
    keep posting your pics, maybe one day Andy Zimmern from the Bizarre Foods show will take notice and decide to visit you up there in Northwest Alaska and feature your area's traditional cuisine. From watching his show, I am sure he can eat moose and caribou kidney with the best of 'em.
    Crisco is high in cholesterol, caribou fat is healthier for you. Sometimes people here use caribou fat and a lil seal oil to make akutaq, nowadays it is mostly the older folks. I really like the taste of a traditional desert made with salmon berries, slightly fermented salmon eggs, mixed with seal oil into a pudding. Now that is some tasty stuff. Tonight we had seal soup with beach greens mixed in, now that is some good eating too. In my area people call traditional foods, real food.

  5. #5
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    Stranger you DO KNOW.... the correct way to cook Kidney don't you?









    toss them in a pot








    and boil the pissoutathem...
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    Good one Vince

    I find the best way to cook Caribou kidneys.......is not at all.

    At -30, a few caribou done, when your worked out, have the sled loaded, hot tea in the cup and a warm slice of cuccumber tasteing caribou kidney, and you will be positivly warm on the way home.

    Akutuk here made with berrys, chopped, kneaded caribou fat whipped with water and seal oil, with small chopped pices of dry shredded whitefish in it and a hint of suger with the Salmonberrys, and a few Cranberrys for tartness.......Mmmmmmmmmmm.......

    We only eat it before sleeping, because its heavy, makes you sleepy and you sleep WARM.... Fuel to burn all night, sleeping or not

    Never had a "Seal soup" with Beach greens, but certainly the soup and aside of steamed greens with vinegar and salt, or butter...Mmmmmmmmmmmm........might just have to try that...... the oldest son has some seals "stashed" in Kotz, awaiting travle tiome, so we can go get 'em......
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    I have enjoyed your Akutuk on many of my visits to that part of the country, it is a treat as you say, though i defiantly DO NOT care for the Crisco brand of cooking


    Seal oil done right is one of the few things i actually miss from out there, there was a grandma in goodnews bay that would make me some flavored with berry's for sweetness.... it was really great, she would also always serve me sea lion to dip in it... as well other meats. folks honestly do not know what they are missing due to the


    HUUURKING and BLICKING factor they were raised with about not eating different things. though i still have never made it past stink head.....or Brussels spouts for that matter
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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    Default

    Wow!!!

    Nuk,

    Back in Texas I had DVR and always recorded every episode of Bizarre Foods! ....It's neat to have other fans aboard!

    Judging by your reply I take it you are a native? Man, I saw that episode of Bizarre Food's when it came to Alaska....I so want some of that special ice cream!....Point me where I can get some.


    Quote Originally Posted by Nukalpiaq View Post
    strangerinastrangeland,
    keep posting your pics, maybe one day Andy Zimmern from the Bizarre Foods show will take notice and decide to visit you up there in Northwest Alaska and feature your area's traditional cuisine. From watching his show, I am sure he can eat moose and caribou kidney with the best of 'em.
    Crisco is high in cholesterol, caribou fat is healthier for you. Sometimes people here use caribou fat and a lil seal oil to make akutaq, nowadays it is mostly the older folks. I really like the taste of a traditional desert made with salmon berries, slightly fermented salmon eggs, mixed with seal oil into a pudding. Now that is some tasty stuff. Tonight we had seal soup with beach greens mixed in, now that is some good eating too. In my area people call traditional foods, real food.

  9. #9
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    Crab_n_fish,
    The best healthiest recipe going for akutaq or like strangerinastrangeland spells it; akutuk, is the one he referred to in an earlier post, made with caribou fat and a lil seal oil. The crisco version is popular but not traditional. If I was you I would ask strangerinastrangeland for a detailed recipe on making it, using wild berries and whitefish as the main ingredients, now that would make your mouth water. Fish added into the akutaq is delicious. My wife uses boiled/ deboned/drained/ squeezed king salmon as an ingredient too.
    I do enjoy watching Bizarre foods, also No Reservations. Usually watch the shows weekly. Cultural based cuisine has always been interesting for me. Good stuff.

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    Ya, if you want a recipie, shoot me a pm.

    Nukalpiaq, Andrew Bourdain is my favorite.
    He eats it all and drinks it too......

    I liked watching him hunt grouse in Greece......and it wouldnt fly.......


    Im in that boat; if it swims, flys, runs, grows under ground or twad the sun, I'll have a try...........'cept reproductive parts.

    A friend and I were working with a Korean guy, we were watching grill some reindeer balls after casteration/tagging/antler cutting round up,(Those crazy korean actually suck the blood from the antlers) and when the Korean offerd a steaming 1/2nut, he yelled " Not in my mouth they dont!!!"~~LOL!!~~
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

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  11. #11

    Default we eat guts down south

    we eat pig guts down here in north carolina, we call them chitlins, you can buy them in the food stores if you wish, but i like the ones from the wild pigs we kill
    we roll them in corn meal, flour and salt and pepper and deep fry them in pig lard, stink but sure do taste good

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    Quote Originally Posted by eagleclaw View Post
    we eat pig guts down here in north carolina, we call them chitlins, you can buy them in the food stores if you wish, but i like the ones from the wild pigs we kill
    we roll them in corn meal, flour and salt and pepper and deep fry them in pig lard, stink but sure do taste good
    eagleclaw,
    Back in North Carolina when I was a boy, my Granny would raise a hog and when it was ready to be butchered, all the relatives would come over to her place. She would have us kids gather up a bunch of chickens and bring them over to the chopping block for her to take care of, then all the men would go take care of the hog. Womenfolk would then start cooking, this would go on all day long, I do recall seeing chitlins too. Nothing like true southern cooking.

    Up here I used to see my Grandmother prepare seal intestines and cook them, guess you can call them chitlins too (native style).

  13. #13

    Default from nc

    you are from nc, where?
    yep cook those pig knuckles, tails, ears, feet, make cracklins out of the fat when rendering it for lard, make head cheese out of the head, liver mush using the hearts, livers, , we everything but the squeel of a hog, that liver much is good stuff, fry it good and crispy with eggs and grits hard to beat

  14. #14
    Member Nukalpiaq's Avatar
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    I was born here in Alaska, parents moved us kids to NC in 1967, moved back in 74 after the seperation, lived in Alaska ever since. My mother is a Yup'ik Eskimo she was born here on our family's home river in hunting camp. When she got older she attended Bob Jones University in Greenville, South Carolina. Somewhere along the way she met my father who is from Lenoir, North Carolina, born and raised there, he was in the military.

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    Default Mmmm

    Have you guys ever ordered a pizza? Its outstanding!

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    zekeski,
    You mean fry bread with melted cheese and sliced meats and diced veggies don't you? haha

  17. #17

    Default fried bread with cheese

    thats a good on, i take it you never seen a wild hog lol nasty suckers but sure are good to eat, pizza is ok but fix my own, come on down i will fix you chittlins, have you throwing rocks at the guts you cook lol

  18. #18

    Default know where that at

    lenoir just up the road from me in the foothills, my mom is half indian so i guess that puts a little bleed in me
    Quote Originally Posted by Nukalpiaq View Post
    I was born here in Alaska, parents moved us kids to NC in 1967, moved back in 74 after the seperation, lived in Alaska ever since. My mother is a Yup'ik Eskimo she was born here on our family's home river in hunting camp. When she got older she attended Bob Jones University in Greenville, South Carolina. Somewhere along the way she met my father who is from Lenoir, North Carolina, born and raised there, he was in the military.

  19. #19
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    eagleclaw, no wonder you have a taste for wild game meat. It is all that Native American blood running through your veins. And nope I have never seen a wild hog, but I have seen a rouge porcupine.
    Been chased by a brown bear, looked into the red eyes of a bull moose during full rut at 15 feet, hunted walrus out in the Bering Sea. Even cornered a wolverine one time, heard a wolf howl in the middle of the night as we were being stalked by a brown bear, while packing moose meat out of the field. But no Sir, have never seen a wild hog. Hog hunting would be fun, especially the bbq afterward.

  20. #20

    Default never had all that happen to me

    nope never had such things happen to me, but been shot at by some bad guys in a desert while jumping out of a helo, but thats another story of my life

    yep them wild hogs are fun to hunt, put them pit bulls out and let them catch them for you then wade in with the dog and hog with a knife or spear and stick that sucker, then throw that rascal on the pit for 24 hours smoking him until the meat falls off the bone, now that some good eating

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