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Thread: Advice for winterizing the garden

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    Default Advice for winterizing the garden

    Looking for advice and suggestions to prepare my raised garden beds for the winter? Tilling, fertilizing, cover/not cover, compost???????

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    We'll remove any plant remnants and call it a year. No tilling 'til spring. In fact Jeff Lowenfels is now advising against any tilling of garden soil. You can decide on that one for yourself. We tried covering ours one year and it made a great nursery for Voles. We don't cover anymore.

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    Member Alaska Grandma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    We'll remove any plant remnants and call it a year. No tilling 'til spring. In fact Jeff Lowenfels is now advising against any tilling of garden soil. You can decide on that one for yourself. We tried covering ours one year and it made a great nursery for Voles. We don't cover anymore.
    We don't till either here until spring. Only mulch a bit on the chive patch. Now this year we got these huge yellow cheeked voles that are migrating north. These guys are big. Don't want them in the garden and this year I was lucky they didn't find it. Will have to pick up some rat traps for those fellers, they don't get caught much in the regular mouse traps.

    Grandma Lori
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    He wouldn't have given us grandmothers. ~Linda Henley

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    Oops! I wish I had learned about the voles sooner. My wife covered our garden. Looks like our cat might have his work cut out for him in the spring.

    The other 299,300,000 people can have it.

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    I cleaned out all the old plant remanents, tilled in some good home grown compost, and raked it out level. I was thinking about covering it with black plastic to help it warm-up in the spring (I live on the dark side of the mountains and need help warming up the soil), but I guess I'll leave it open and not create a "critter colony".

    Thanks for the advice so far, but there must be more ideas...anyone?

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    My wife's been trying to find some onion sets. Onions and garlic should go into the ground now. Garlic is easy. We can't find the onions!

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    Member Alaska Grandma's Avatar
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    MORSNO, To get your garden to warm up faster in the spring, try sprinkling wood ash on the garden in early spring (April maybe), just a thin layer, then add some more in later spring or as you get more late snow. Those layers of ash really help melt the snow once the sun has some warmth in it. I live on the dark side too

    Mr. Pid, seems I am never in town at just the right time to find onion sets anymore, so switched to bunching onion seeds a few years ago. I only pick the green tops so they keep coming back. After a couple years I got a nice patch. Let us know where/if you find any sets.

    Grandma Lori
    If God had intended us to follow recipes,
    He wouldn't have given us grandmothers. ~Linda Henley

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    Thanks Alaska Grandma, great advice using ashes from my wood stove!

  9. #9

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    I just try to clean everything up,last year I covered up 2 very tall rows with visqueen for the garlic beds.
    Ive had terrible luck overwintering the cloves as they rot in the spring during breakup(nasty lil mites too).Had my best yield so far this fall,unfortunately Ive been to busy to take care of the beds this fall,but I see no reason why i cant clear off the snow and throw the covers down.
    The covers gave me a few more precious weeks of spring growth after digging them out while the snow is still on the ground in the spring.
    And the stove ash idea really does help too.

    ak4195

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