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Thread: Sport Fishing Rules of Consumption

  1. #1
    Member OzarkAngler's Avatar
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    Default Sport Fishing Rules of Consumption

    I hope someone can answer this question. I can't find it on the AK Fish Reg site.

    Lodges in Alaska... the salmon that are caught by clients and/or guides of the camp or lodge (sport fishing), can they be prepared at the lodge for clients OR can they be prepared as a shore lunch?

    I've recently heard that this practice is illegal or against the code. I've eaten alot of fish prepared at various lodges as well as on gavel bars on rivers and lake in AK that were caught by us (clients).

    I just want to make sure I'm not in violation next time.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Member thewhop2000's Avatar
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    Smile Dude, you catch ,you can eat it

    Catch it and you can cook it. Nough said. Ken

  3. #3
    Member OzarkAngler's Avatar
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    A trooper called a friend of mine who's a guide and asked about the lodge he worked at this summer... asked if the lodge served "sport caught salmon" to their clients. He said it was a violation and the lodge could lose their license for 3 years.

    So I was trying to find out if this is true. If it is, I'd think most lodges, especially camps, would find themselves in violation and facing a hard decision... it's saves an outfitter alot of money feeding fish to their clients.

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by OzarkAngler View Post
    A trooper called a friend of mine who's a guide and asked about the lodge he worked at this summer... asked if the lodge served "sport caught salmon" to their clients. He said it was a violation and the lodge could lose their license for 3 years.

    So I was trying to find out if this is true. If it is, I'd think most lodges, especially camps, would find themselves in violation and facing a hard decision... it's saves an outfitter alot of money feeding fish to their clients.
    Using sport-caught fish for commercial purposes (to feed clients) is against the law. No problem if the client cooked and ate his own fish.

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    Member OzarkAngler's Avatar
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    Default

    Thanks for the reply.

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    Member MRFISH's Avatar
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    Default here's my guess...

    Quote Originally Posted by OzarkAngler View Post
    A trooper called a friend of mine who's a guide and asked about the lodge he worked at this summer... asked if the lodge served "sport caught salmon" to their clients. He said it was a violation and the lodge could lose their license for 3 years.

    So I was trying to find out if this is true. If it is, I'd think most lodges, especially camps, would find themselves in violation and facing a hard decision... it's saves an outfitter alot of money feeding fish to their clients.
    I think the distinction may lie with whether the sport-caught fish is being prepared for and served while the client or party that caught it is present (and with their approval, of course)...or if the lodge is just using sport-caught fish to feed their general clientele...the latter would, in my opinion, be a use of sport-caught fish for commercial purposes and not allowable (since part of the package cost usually includes meals).

    I don't think there's anything wrong with shore lunches (or with the first part of my example above)...but the fish caught and consumed still counts toward that angler's daily bag limit or any annual limits (if applicable).

  7. #7

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    I don't think it matters if the fish that were caught are yours, or your groups'. It is ok to eat somebody else's fish as all of us have been invited to a salmon BBQ and eaten sport caught fish that were harvested by someone else. I would also assume that many of us have had salmon or halibut given to us as sometimes friends catch that 150 pound halibut and it just doesn't fit in the freezer like they thought it would. Or, they go dipnetting on the Kenai and bring home way more than they can eat in a lifetime let alone a winter. I always end up saying no to their kind offer because I don't have any room either as 90 percent of the time the family freezer is chock full that time of year. Since wasting it is crime, giving it away seems like a heck of lot better option althought it is illegal. If there is a citation, I have a hard time believing it would stand up in any court of law since nothing other than a "thank you" was exchanged. While I doubt data even exists for this, I think gifting fish to others is a pretty common practice up here to be honest; be it legal or not.

    Now like Mr. Fish pointed out, if the lodge you are staying at is charging you for a dinner and it includes somebody elses sport caught fish that is not in your party, then that is cut and dry against the provisions of the law. It is however perfectly legal for lodges and restaurants to charge for preparation of sport caught fish that the legal owner is eating just as it ok for businesses to charge to pack and ship your fish. But, all of this turns into a slippery slope very quickly which will ultimately land you in hot water if you are not careful......

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