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Thread: small round for goats-

  1. #1

    Default small round for goats-

    What the smallest round you could use for goat hunting- trying to decide what rifle to bring

  2. #2
    Member moses42ak's Avatar
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    I would suggest bringing the largest caliber you have that you can confidently shoot. That being said, my personal minimum would be my 25-06 with premium bullets. Concentrate on your shot placement.

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    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
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    I would say the same thing. Generally you want the goat to fall right where he is at. Not wander off and fall off a cliff.

    Not having shot alot of goats I cant tell you what the minimum caliber would be. But I would venture to guess something in the .270 and up realm would probably anchor one nicely. If it were me Id bring something in the .30 cal class, like a 30/06 or .300 win mag.

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Pound for pound one of the tuffest game critters to shoot and anchor.JMHO but 6.5x55 or 7mm08 would be as light as I would go with very good bullets and lots of pratice

  5. #5

    Default +1

    The 6.5x55 or the 260 Rem are very good starting calibers with premium bullets and good shot placement the key.
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

    On the road of life..... Pot holes keep things interesting !

  6. #6

    Default 7x57

    bet the old 7x57 loaded with 140 grain barns at 3100 fps would be the trick, so i have been told

  7. #7

    Default Maybe

    Quote Originally Posted by eagleclaw View Post
    bet the old 7x57 loaded with 140 grain barns at 3100 fps would be the trick, so i have been told
    But you might not live to see it with a bolt sticking out of your head. Thats way hotter than a 284 Win which has a higher case capacity and pressure range.
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

    On the road of life..... Pot holes keep things interesting !

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    Member icb12's Avatar
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    doesn't matter what you shoot. You don't shoot them in the right place and they will run, tumble, fall, jump, kamikaze, you name it. Even shot through both front shoulders and "anchored" a goat can push itself farther than you would think with its back legs. Just because they lay down does not mean they are dead. They are just resting while thinking of alternative ways to screw you over or make your life difficult.

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    Quote Originally Posted by brav01 View Post
    But you might not live to see it with a bolt sticking out of your head. Thats way hotter than a 284 Win which has a higher case capacity and pressure range.
    Hornady offers a Light Magnum load that gives their 139 grain SP bullet a MV of 2950 fps. FWIW

  10. #10
    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    7MM or bigger...

  11. #11

    Default Anchor 'em

    Agree with what has already been written--you want to anchor that goat and make sure he is anchored for good--this tends to lead to a larger caliber as preferable--but accuracy needs to be part of the equation too.

    People constantly revisit the caliber/cartridge debate--think the two best answers for Alaska hunting (not just goat hunting) are always:

    1. No such thing as too dead...

    2. Shoot the largest caliber you can accurately shoot...

    Goats always are thinking of ways to get away and will throw themselves off cliffs just to spite you.

    I once shot a nice billy from about 30 yards with a .300 Winmag fail safe round. He was dying but kept trying to flop to the edge of the cliff. Rather than put another round in him at such a close range I decided (stupidly) to go over to him and drag him by his back legs back up the slope he was on. As I neared him he was gnashing his teeth and I swear he was like growling too. He was trying his best to get away from me/hurt me. I didn't take the hint and reached down to grab one of his back legs--as I bent over to grab a leg he kicked with the other--his sharp hoof went whistling past my head and almost got me. I can imagine what damage it would have caused if he would have connected--might have earned myself a Darwin award on that hunt.
    Well--that woke me up and I finally learned my lesson on how stubborn and mean a big billy can be...

  12. #12
    Member Bearclaw67's Avatar
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    257 weatherby mag. will get the job done.
    Paul

  13. #13
    Premium Member Wyo2AK's Avatar
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    I was with my buddy weekend before last and watched him shoot a goat with his 338 RUM. Seemed adequate.

    Some good advice above. Heading back on the water taxi, we picked up another group of goat hunters. A guy had shot a nice billy, dropped it on the spot. He and his buddies started high-fiving and celebrating. Goat kicked one time and fell off a cliff. They spent two days trying but never could recover it.

    I'd say, from my albeit limited goat hunting experience, more important than the rifle is waiting to shoot a goat when he's in an area you'll be able to recover him from, even if he does take a bit of fall.
    Pursue happiness with diligence.

  14. #14
    Member 8x57 Mauser's Avatar
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    You are not out of brown bear country when hunting mountain goats.

    Just a thought.

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    I've killed 2 billies, one just over 9" and the other close to 10" and scored just into B&C. That being said, I clearly don't have the Goat hunting experience that some do. I killed my first billy with my 30.06 and 150 grain Nosler Partitions. 1 shot through the heart/lungs at 150yds and he slid 15-20 ft and stopped on a reasonably flat bench. My other billy took lead from a .270 at just at 400yds. The first shot was a complete pass through both lungs...he seemed dead on his feet but, as has been advised, I put 2 more in his vitals before he staggered to the edge of his perch, looked around, and whispered f--- it and kicked himself off...a couple hundred feet later he stopped, none the worse for wear.

    I think it is WAY more about the country/landscape you shoot them in rather than the load/caliber you use...thought I didn't need to hunt another goat but talking about them is giving me the itch...definitely more of a challenge than sheep...IMO

  16. #16
    Member Magnum Man's Avatar
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    Lightbulb goats are tough

    My dad I went on a diy goat hunt a few years back. I had a 243 and he had a 270. It came down to the last afternoon of the last day that we had to get off the hill and we caught up the group of six that we had been trying to catch up to the last two days. It came down to about a 4-500 yd shot. My 243 barely penetrated the ribs and hide. And 2 shoulder shots with the 270 didnt even get past the shoulder to the vitals. My dad ended up popping him in the back of the head for the kill. We fired about six shots that were surely non fatal before the head shot put him on his back legs straight up doing a funky quiver. He was 9 1/2 inches and over 200lbs easy. And there was on a little bigger we didnt get the shot on. I would say 270 and up for sure and 150 grains and up on the bullet. If you to need to shoot at some distance. Goats are tough very thick hair and hide. If I go again ill probably use my 7mm mag cuz its a lot lighter than my .300.

  17. #17
    Member AK-HUNT's Avatar
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    Default bigger is better for goat

    The more I hunt goats the bigger the caliber I carry. Save yourself the learning curve. Carry the biggest gun you can shoot well like everyone says. I personally would not shoot smaller than 30/06 for goat and that's a very min. Shoot .338 mostly. Saw them take LOTS of lead and seen them run and jump unrecoverable. I like my lightweight mountain rifle but the weight savings isn't smart on goats. My .02.

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