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Thread: Track Replacement Questions

  1. #1
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    Default Track Replacement Questions

    I just purchased my first snow machine and I have some questions about track replacement. I have a 1993 Polaris Indy SKS 500 it has a studded 3/4 inch track on it now. It also came with a 1 1/4 inch paddle track. I wanted to know what the cost would be to change the track. I am on a very limited budget and am not sure if the 3/4 inch track would be fine or if I should spend some money on changing the track. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks

  2. #2
    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    Default

    Changing the track is a bit of work, but not impossible to do yourself. I've done a couple and it takes a few hours but you will learn a lot about your machine in the process.

    My advice would be to get a service manual and go for it!
    AKmud
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  3. #3
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    Default

    Ya, i would also venture to do it yourself.. It is not really really hard.. Just takes a little bit, and while your at it you can do a little bit of preventative maintanence to everything involved in the process (grease zerts, change chaincase oil, seals, etc.).. Just make sure that the tracks are the same length before you go taking things apart.. You can probably ask any questions you have in the process on here and people will give advice as well... good luck..

  4. #4
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    First sled? Just go ride it. When the time comes that you want to change it, find a friend who knows how to pull the skid and drive shaft and get some help. It isn't hard for somebody that's done it. It'll be hard for somebody that hasn't. You'll especially enjoy the through shafts on the skid your first time. With a 6 pack and a buddy who knows how to wrench it'll take you a couple of hours at most. Longer with a 12 pack. The only special tool you'll need is a long Allen wrench to loosen the shaft retainer collars. I don't remember the size off the top of my head, either.

    The EFI 500s are good sleds. I'd recommend buying one LH and one RH threaded tie rod end and an idler wheel and pack them on the sled for spares. When you get stuck, and you will, the easiest way to pull the sled out is to grab a ski loop and tug. Do that a few times and a tie rod end will break. Idler bearings just give up and the idler wheel exits the sled. No big deal.

    Welcome to riding. Have a great winter!

  5. #5
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    Yes, it is my first sled. It is EFI and Liquid cooled. I will try and find someone to help me out to change it. I'm sure that it will bring some valuable experience fixing the sled. I will be sure to pick up the spare parts. Any thing else that I should have in my emergency kit. Right now I have a spare belt, spark plugs, 100ft of 550 cord, shovel, duct tape, and the tool kit that it came with. I will also put it a first aid kit, space blanket, hatchet/saw combo, leatherman, extra hat and gloves, etc. Any other tools that I need?

  6. #6
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    Your list is a good one. I'd add a few feet of safety wire and a some assorted zip ties. You can cobble a lot of things back together with the wire. Zip ties are handy for lots of things. I've frankensteined several windshields back together over the years using zip ties. Including one last winter.

  7. #7
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    Where you located? I had the same sled about 4 years ago and swapped the track out 3 times. I would be more than willing to give you a hand if you are in the Fairbanks area.

  8. #8
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    I live in the Palmer/Wasilla area. Thanks for the offer

  9. #9
    Member Milo's Avatar
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    Default First time

    The first time will definitely take longer than a couple hours. The next time will be a lot quicker. If you decide to do it, I would also inspect your idler wheel bearings, shocks, chain case, and drive shaft bearings while you have it apart. Easier now than later.

    The "problem" with older sleds is that its not really worth paying a lot for labor to fix them, so you're kinda forced to turn wrenches yourself.

  10. #10
    Member Jktimm's Avatar
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    Default I agree with Mr. Pid

    Ride your machine for a while before taking it apart. Early riding is almost always better with short lugs and especially with studs. Traction issues are almost always ice with too little snow, that's why the old owner had the studded track. When we get a dump of snow and you start getting stuck by spinning the track, then switch to the paddle track. Some years we don't get enough snow to change over ( I hope that doesn't happen.) One other thing I would add to your list of stuff is a couple of chem heat packs. When your hands get cold it's easy to open a heat pack rather than build a fire or???

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