Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: My wife.....

  1. #1

    Default My wife.....

    We have a 20 foot boat, and my wife is a stay at home mom. I work at GCI. We have a cabin at Moose Pass. We keep our boat in a slip in Seward all summer.

    We are at our cabin in Moose Pass in Sept... Boat's in the driveway.

    My wife says, "we need to get rid of the cabin in Moose Pass, sell the 20 ft boat and buy a ~28 ft boat that we can sleep in..... F** our out of town guests." They can sleep on shore or rent a boat.

    So, I don't want to brag... but..... we have a 4 year old and a wife that LOVES boating. How quickly should I take her up on this?

    We can make this happen ASAP!! Am I wasting time typing this???

    I have to say... for what we pay for the cabin and the small boat we could buy a sweet boat that we could sleep on...

    Thoughts?

  2. #2
    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    4,670

    Smile

    Jump on the opportunity before she comes to her senses!

  3. #3
    Member skybust's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    alaska
    Posts
    2,424

    Default

    sell sell sell, buy buy buy enough said

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Wasilla Alaska
    Posts
    456

    Default FYI

    I would hasten to START the process but not the bying part, not unless you've already answered all the questions that you'll be proud of or that will plague you in the future.
    1. Do you intend to trailer or keep the slip. You can easily trailer up to 30 ft!
    2. Are you a go fast guy or would a semi planner do? Maybe a full displacement? If shopping used boats, you will notice the slower they go the cheaper they are amoung equal quality manafacturers.
    3. What drive do you prefer, I'd go diesel if doing it all over again.

    This list could go on and on based on your own desires. The only real important thing to remember is to have fun. We bought a 25.5 C-dory 5 years ago as a first real salt boat and have been real happy over all with that decision. For us, looking at the wide variety of offerings out there it all comes down to user friendliness and we have that for sure.
    I'm sure your thread has the potential to entertain us thru a big piece of the winter, I'm equally sure you will recieve lots of advice!
    You owe it to your self to do a net search looking for "Island Marine center" (lopez wash) check out their Ocean Sport models. If money is not your prime motivator, you would be hard pressed to buy a better boat than these.
    Mike

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Soldotna, AK
    Posts
    108

    Default

    I went through a similar situation about a year and a half ago. We had a 28ft 5th Wheel that didn't get much use. One day my wife says we would probably get more use out of an ocean boat. After talking about it for a day or two, we sold the 5th Wheel and started looking for a boat. It took a few months to find the right boat. As a family we all still feel like we made the right decision
    USN Seabee '90-'95, NRA Life Member

  6. #6
    Member Lone Wolf1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    327

    Talking my dog cost me over $40,000...

    ...because my wife and I used to go EVERYWHERE in our 1981 16' Zodiac -- bear hunting, halibut fishing, silver fishing, camping, etc. It was never comfortable, but got us where we needed to go. However, when we got our new puppy 3 years ago, the wife said we, "need a bigger boat for the dog."

    Now, the rest of the story...

    For years, I had a yearning for a cabin on some remote land. Although we looked at a few possibilities over the years, we never made the commitment. Finally, my wife (sensibly) said, "Why do we want to go through all the agony and spend thousands of $$$ on a cabin in a mosquito-infested area that we'd visit maybe once or twice a year, and that has a never-changing view? Why don't we get a big boat instead? That way, we can have a 'cabin on the water', and if we don't like the view, we pull anchor and move to a different cove." I found it hard to argue with that logic, and it snapped me out of my "land fever."

    Our new puppy gave us the final "push", and we bought an older 28' Bayliner Contessa. We've never regretted it, and love our time in our "cabin on the water."

    So that's how my dog cost me over $40,000.

  7. #7

    Default I'm kind of in the same situation

    I have a cabin and a small boat. I have thought about getting rid of the cabin and getting a larger boat, but we love our cabin. For me it doesn't make financial sense. Boats are depreciating assets and cabins/recreational property can be appreciating assets. A large boat would cost more to keep/maintain then my cabin and wouldn't be worth nearly as much 10 years down the road. Another good thing is when the weather is rough I am warm and cozy on dry land waiting for better weather to venture out in my little boat. Hope you get it figured out and have fun with the family no matter what you decide.

  8. #8
    Member ACBMAN's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Anchorage only because that's where the work is
    Posts
    160

    Default Owning a big boat

    What you need is a friend with a great safe boat and know how to take care of him ,one of my lines is I wish I meet someone like me before I bought my boat, it's very expensive and take up a lot of time.

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Shanonamous View Post
    I have a cabin and a small boat. I have thought about getting rid of the cabin and getting a larger boat, but we love our cabin. For me it doesn't make financial sense. Boats are depreciating assets and cabins/recreational property can be appreciating assets. A large boat would cost more to keep/maintain then my cabin and wouldn't be worth nearly as much 10 years down the road. Another good thing is when the weather is rough I am warm and cozy on dry land waiting for better weather to venture out in my little boat. Hope you get it figured out and have fun with the family no matter what you decide.
    You used the words "boat' and 'asset' in the same sentence.

    That is just crazy talk.
    I can't come to bed right now honey - somebody on the internet is wrong.

    When you believe in things you don't understand, then you suffer . . . " - Stevie Wonder

  10. #10
    Member L. G.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    N'ern S.E. AK
    Posts
    838

    Default

    The million dollar question is - do you need the boat to get to your cabin?

    I need to run 30 miles of inside passage to get to mine, so not having a boat is not an option.

  11. #11
    Member bhollis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    255

    Default

    We own a 30-foot SeaSport Voyager, and we definitely see it as our mobile "cabin." It's just as comfortable as a small cabin (more so in some ways, with running water, toilet, electricity, etc.), and it combines two things my wife and I both love: camping and the ocean. And the great thing about it is that we can enjoy our cabin in a new setting (new cove, bay, harbor) every weekend. And then there's the fishing . . .

    Of course it's true that boats are a lot of work, and they are depreciating assets. But you can minimize the amount of work required by buying a a good quality aluminum or fiberglass boat in good condition, with high quality fittings and equipment. Buying a good quality boat from a recognized builder, and maintaining it well, will also serve you well you when it comes to resell.

    There's no right answer, of course. It's all about choices--how you want to spend your time and money.

  12. #12

    Default

    My experience on aluminum boat depreciation - I'm on my 3rd one. The first was only used for 1 year and was sold for what was paid. The second was used for 5 years and was sold for $1500 more than what was paid. They sure do not depreciate like your car.

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,448

    Default

    Yes they do depreciate but what is the "appreciation" of fishing and sleeping on the ocean worth? PRICLESS!!

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    950

    Default Greener grass

    Funny, I've been thinking about doing just the oposite. Although I love going out in Prince William Sound, I've grown weary of both maintaining a 28' boat/trailer and dealing with launching out of Whittier. My though was to get a place in or near Seward and get a smaller faster, simpler boat. Go out fishing for the day, come back and enjoy cocktails in the evening without worrying about draggin anchor.

  15. #15
    Member NewMoon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Holladay, UT
    Posts
    126

    Default

    Hi mhpilot,

    My wife and I have spent a number of summers cruising SE Alaska in our 26' diesel boat, and many multi-week stints on the BC coast. Designed and equipped appropriately, a small boat can be a great way to enjoy the beauty of coastal waters. We've often talked about how it compares to the cabins some friends have. The boat offers many advantages, not least of which is the ability to travel an endless variety of spectacular places nowhere near any road. Even our towable boat can accommodate two or three adults, or two adults and two smaller folks. You might find it interesting to take a peek at our recent book on small boat cruising:

    http://www.lulu.com/content/paperbac...ig-way/5835870
    Richard Cook
    New Moon (Bounty 257)
    "Cruising in a Big Way"

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •