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Thread: Teepee Tested Tough. Kodiak Approved.

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    Member icb12's Avatar
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    Default Teepee Tested Tough. Kodiak Approved.

    Tested my GoLite ShangraLa 3 on Kodiak Last week. Winds were forecast at 40 knots on the coast. I can honestly say they were much much higher in the mountains. The teepee took it all. I was impressed to say the least. Good shelter.

    Use some intelligence when picking a spot, and use some intelligence when staking it. I stayed wind free, and dry. Compared to HIGH dollar tents, and heavy heavy tents.. I was extremely impressed.


    Floorless ROCKS!!!

    I was even more impressed considering the report Roland gave us of the goat hunters using a bombshelter with the same forecast.

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    floorless can get good if you pick your spot, sounds like you did. whats the weight on that set up?
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    Quote Originally Posted by BRWNBR View Post
    floorless can get good if you pick your spot, sounds like you did. whats the weight on that set up?
    Its three pounds out of the box. with 6 stakes. I added more stakes so just a smidge over. Switch to a carbon fiber main pole and you will lose the weight you gained from more stakes.

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    Do you have any pics you can post in the "Tent Photos and Info" sticky thread?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Snyd View Post
    Do you have any pics you can post in the "Tent Photos and Info" sticky thread?
    sure I'll dig up a bunch

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    I too took a teepee to Kodiak this year, a TiGoat Vertex 8. It went a little over 8 pounds with the stove. Just to be safe, and since it was a fly out with lots of weight to spare, I took along some 10" nails to use instead of the tent stakes. I don't know for sure what the winds were, but the forecast called for winds up to 45 mph. It stood up just fine.

    The only drawback to this set up is the single wall design and the corresponding moisture issues that go along with it. In retrospect I probably should have purchased the Kifaru teepee and liner. But, you can't beat the weight of the TiGoat and it's simplicity.
    "Beware the man with only one gun; he may know how to use it."

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    my one man tents with footprint and fly are right at 3lbs, but i'm guessing i'm sacrificing roomyiness (is that a word??) over your teepee
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    Yeah I think you could be served well with a teepee. At 3lbs for a single person tent you could get the Shangri-La 4 oasis for $220 here. I'm going to be picking one up and using it as my new 3 season tent. I also bought the 2 man nest to fit inside it when I know the bugs are bad ($90 and 2 lbs). All up its 5.5 lbs for 90 sq ft of space and still completely bug proof with a waterproof floor on half of it for sleeping area and the other have is 45 sq ft of vestibule that you can standy up in and get dressed (6' 2" center height). I usually go with my wife when backpacking.

    But if you are looking at just using for yourself I think you'd be better served with the Shangri-la 3 at 2.5 lbs and 59 sq ft of space and 5'2" center height. LOTS of space for one guy and probably handles the wind better being a lower profile. Then get the inner nest of the Shangri-la 1 $70 and 1.5 lbs and you'd be bug proof with huge vestibule for 4 lbs even. Or if bugs don't bother you leave the nest at home.

    Everyone raves how they buck these GoLite shelters wind and GoLite rates all their Shangri-las as 4 season, but I don't know. I'll stick to using it for 3 season camping and packrafting and keep using my Hilley for the mountain stuff until I get some more testing..

    Stuff to think about 3.5 lbs for 90 sq ft of space and being able to stand up in (which makes me leary of its wind worthiness, but I'll keep ya posted on how it holds up).
    Last edited by Alaska_Lanche; 09-28-2009 at 21:37.

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    Default Teepee

    I've used an 8 man tee pee from Kifaru with a wood stove down on Kodiak for 4 trips and will be making another this Nov. They are quite roomy, warm and lightweight. Have weathered some good storms in Nov. with no problems, I use 14" metal stakes. I use a liner that elimanates the condensation issue. Floorless is nice too. As you can tell I like mine a lot!

    Pic is from the North Slope....can't seem to find the Kodiak ones.
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    Used a Shangri-la 4 for sheep and a moose float this year.

    For sheep, we made sure to pitch the tent on good-draining ground. It is an absolute palace for two guys. We had ourselves and our gear inside, and could spread out / sort / dry our gear easily. Cooked inside, too. Yes, the walls sweat, but the shelter is large enough that the walls are easy to avoid. If I read the specs right, it's about 3.5 lbs with aluminum pole and 8 aluminum y-stakes.

    I had a TI-Goat stove jack sewed in just before the moose float, and I made a stovepipe from some 0.004" stainless shim stock from McMaster Carr and a stove from some old cookpots and the shim stock. WOW - nice to have a dry place to warm up. Stove will be refined further before next season. Stovepipe weighs ~ 1 lb, and stove about two.

    We didn't have any windy weather to speak of. I did buy eight walmart-special 10" steel stakes (less than two bucks per four stakes) for riverbar camping on the moose trip, and they worked great.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BRWNBR View Post
    my one man tents with footprint and fly are right at 3lbs, but i'm guessing i'm sacrificing roomyiness (is that a word??) over your teepee
    Its hit or miss really. Yes you are sacrifice room. For one man the tipi has boatloads of space. But realistically, the situation I was in, with the outside stakes down, the inside stakes down, and the pole on the lowest setting (to better buck the wind), its roomy for one man, but tight for two. The odd part is the way the walls slope & the pole in the middle, so lots and lots of floor space but movement is still limited with my tipi. The cats pajamas is when you camp under a tree and can just tie the top loop to a limb and thus no need for the center pole!!! Talk about rooomy!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska_Lanche View Post
    Yeah I think you could be served well with a teepee. At 3lbs for a single person tent you could get the Shangri-La 4 oasis for $220 here. I'm going to be picking one up and using it as my new 3 season tent. I also bought the 2 man nest to fit inside it when I know the bugs are bad ($90 and 2 lbs). All up its 5.5 lbs for 90 sq ft of space and still completely bug proof with a waterproof floor on half of it for sleeping area and the other have is 45 sq ft of vestibule that you can standy up in and get dressed (6' 2" center height). I usually go with my wife when backpacking.

    But if you are looking at just using for yourself I think you'd be better served with the Shangri-la 3 at 2.5 lbs and 59 sq ft of space and 5'2" center height. LOTS of space for one guy and probably handles the wind better being a lower profile. Then get the inner nest of the Shangri-la 1 $70 and 1.5 lbs and you'd be bug proof with huge vestibule for 4 lbs even. Or if bugs don't bother you leave the nest at home.

    Everyone raves how they buck these GoLite shelters wind and GoLite rates all their Shangri-las as 4 season, but I don't know. I'll stick to using it for 3 season camping and packrafting and keep using my Hilley for the mountain stuff until I get some more testing..

    Stuff to think about 3.5 lbs for 90 sq ft of space and being able to stand up in (which makes me leary of its wind worthiness, but I'll keep ya posted on how it holds up).
    My SLA 3 is 2# 15oz. So 3 #. Plus some extra MSR stakes (just like the ones go lite sent me in the box). Just a heads up. I personally think the 3 is better suited to handle winds and weather better than the other 2 pole setups, as the surface area is diminished and less to go wrong really.
    I was pretty leary about taking my shelter to kodiak.. especially when I got the forecast and talking to Roland on the way out. However, after this trip.. I will no longer hesitate to take my tipi anywhere in any weather condtions. (Yes. I was that impressed.) With the tipi and the bivy sack, i feel pretty dang impenetrable.

    The only downside to the tipi, is it does take quite a bit of space to pitch, yet this is mitigated by the fact that you have a lot of flexibility in HOW you pitch it. The center pole can be an issue sometimes.. but not usually.
    Quote Originally Posted by Vek View Post
    Used a Shangri-la 4 for sheep and a moose float this year.

    For sheep, we made sure to pitch the tent on good-draining ground. It is an absolute palace for two guys. We had ourselves and our gear inside, and could spread out / sort / dry our gear easily. Cooked inside, too. Yes, the walls sweat, but the shelter is large enough that the walls are easy to avoid. If I read the specs right, it's about 3.5 lbs with aluminum pole and 8 aluminum y-stakes.

    I had a TI-Goat stove jack sewed in just before the moose float, and I made a stovepipe from some 0.004" stainless shim stock from McMaster Carr and a stove from some old cookpots and the shim stock. WOW - nice to have a dry place to warm up. Stove will be refined further before next season. Stovepipe weighs ~ 1 lb, and stove about two.

    We didn't have any windy weather to speak of. I did buy eight walmart-special 10" steel stakes (less than two bucks per four stakes) for riverbar camping on the moose trip, and they worked great.
    VeK; Did you buy the stove jack and such from TI GOAT?? Where did you have it sewn in?? Im interested in this!! Requesting more info (links would be rad).

    Really I am extremely pleased with the performance and the weight. Now to get a much much light bag and bivy setup and I will be ready to rock!!

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    i'd be curious to see how the teepee stands up in some 80mph winds, i've had single walls stuff before and got really tired of the water on the inside.
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    Quote Originally Posted by BRWNBR View Post
    i'd be curious to see how the teepee stands up in some 80mph winds, i've had single walls stuff before and got really tired of the water on the inside.
    It was blowing hard enough for a while last sunday that it pushed me into the rocks and trapped me there. I literally could not move off the side of the rocks thats how hard the wind was gusting in the mountains. Im a pretty solid 183#. I don't know how fast that was.. but it was windy enough for me.

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    [QUOTE=icb12;584052Just a heads up. I personally think the 3 is better suited to handle winds and weather better than the other 2 pole setups, as the surface area is diminished and less to go wrong really.
    QUOTE]

    Actually the SL3 & SL4 have a single pole teepee style design. The GoLite Shangri-La 2, 6, & 8 have the double pole design. I am actually having a TI Goat stove jack sewn into both my SL 4 & SL 8.

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    Stove jack from TiGoat - it's buried somewhere on their webpage - call them. He ships it in a priority envelope for cheap.

    AK Tent wouldn't sew the jack, due to some sort of liability BS on their part (their question: "Is the surrounding silnylon tent material flame resistant?" my response: "No, hence the stove jack". I didn't get very far with them after that, and won't do any more business with them unless forced to do so. I'm not sure what their deal was.). Instead, I dropped the tent and jack at Jenny's Alterations, along with some detailed spoken and drawn instructions, as there's a bit of a language barrier to breach there. She got it perfect, for $25. I sewed the jack in position such that the little vent hood on at the peak of the SL4 shelter hangs over the top lip of the stove jack.

    I made stainless hoops out of downrigger cable for securing the shim sheet in a cylindrical shape. I had brass sleeves and a crimping tool already, though. You might need to go another direction for that instead of buying yet another $30 tool that's useful only to halibut fisherman and lightweight woodstove users... maybe using hard stainless wire.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska_Lanche View Post
    Actually the SL3 & SL4 have a single pole teepee style design. The GoLite Shangri-La 2, 6, & 8 have the double pole design. I am actually having a TI Goat stove jack sewn into both my SL 4 & SL 8.
    oooh i gotcha.. the 4 is the square tipi?? I kind of like that set up as the room looks a little more usable then the hexagon shape of the 3 that mine has.
    Quote Originally Posted by Vek View Post
    Stove jack from TiGoat - it's buried somewhere on their webpage - call them. He ships it in a priority envelope for cheap.

    AK Tent wouldn't sew the jack, due to some sort of liability BS on their part (their question: "Is the surrounding silnylon tent material flame resistant?" my response: "No, hence the stove jack". I didn't get very far with them after that, and won't do any more business with them unless forced to do so. I'm not sure what their deal was.). Instead, I dropped the tent and jack at Jenny's Alterations, along with some detailed spoken and drawn instructions, as there's a bit of a language barrier to breach there. She got it perfect, for $25. I sewed the jack in position such that the little vent hood on at the peak of the SL4 shelter hangs over the top lip of the stove jack.

    I made stainless hoops out of downrigger cable for securing the shim sheet in a cylindrical shape. I had brass sleeves and a crimping tool already, though. You might need to go another direction for that instead of buying yet another $30 tool that's useful only to halibut fisherman and lightweight woodstove users... maybe using hard stainless wire.
    thanks for the info. I'll be calling them in the future.

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    Im curious... and since this is my thread to hijack ... for you guys with the shangra la 4... the pyramid. Why did you choose that over the Utopia 4 shelter?? The free standing tarp?

    If I was to do it again.. I think I would go with the utopia. I love my tipi, but the utopia is freestanding, and still plenty light, you could still get a stove jack sewn in. also the space is usable in any configuration since there is no pole in the middle. So what was your reasoning??

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    A couple things: Price and ability to stand up inside.

    Price - the SL4 cost me $100 less than the retail price on the utopia - I didn't even consider it as an option, really. It looks great, and would be perhaps a touch more versatile than the SL4. I don't like the idea of sewing in a stove jack for it - the wall at the jack location wouldn't be as steep as with the SL4 when considering how the jack sheds rain. Would be nice to be without the center pole, but really, the SL4 is so roomy for two guys, the pole doesn't matter. Weight is about a wash.

    The SL4 pitched steep with pole extended yields a ton of floor space inside. It truly is a palace for two guys.

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    Just returned from two weeks in my sh-la 4 for stones sheep. It worked great. I have a ti goat cyl stove with it and the whole set up with jack and extra pegs is 4.8 lbs. We had rain and wind and it held up fine. The only other mod I am thinking of is I might sew an extra 6"-8" of syl nylon around the bottom for better sealing with the ground. If I include some straps I can still tie up the extra material for more ventilation when wanted. One problem with the setup is that it is tough to find enough room to set it up. Some of the places were not flat so there were big gaps on one side. Lots of room for 2 and gear. One hunting partner referred to it as my condo.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mod7rem View Post
    Just returned from two weeks in my sh-la 4 for stones sheep. It worked great. I have a ti goat cyl stove with it and the whole set up with jack and extra pegs is 4.8 lbs. We had rain and wind and it held up fine. The only other mod I am thinking of is I might sew an extra 6"-8" of syl nylon around the bottom for better sealing with the ground. If I include some straps I can still tie up the extra material for more ventilation when wanted. One problem with the setup is that it is tough to find enough room to set it up. Some of the places were not flat so there were big gaps on one side. Lots of room for 2 and gear. One hunting partner referred to it as my condo.
    Does the SLA 4 not have internal stake loops?? My tipi has a stake loop inside the tipi for every loop outside. So i pitch it loosely, stake inside and out and put hte pole on the lowest setting. Essentially this kills those big gaps on uneven ground and does what the extra 6-8" you are talking about installing would do. Staking inside DOES kill a little floorspace. But waaaay more than enough room still for one man and gear. 2 and gear with a stove might be tight.. but doable.

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