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Thread: Mercury, tungsten bead and oil and piston type recoil reducers

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    Member Nukalpiaq's Avatar
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    Default Mercury, tungsten bead and oil and piston type recoil reducers

    Was just reading a lil about recoil reducers, basically 3 types; mercury, tungsten bead (type used by Blaser, called the Kickstop) and an oil and piston type.
    Have any of you forum members used either one of these types in a hunting rifle, and if so how effective are they at reducing felt recoil.
    Should they be installed by a gunsmith or can they be home installed?
    Just from my initial research Blaser's websites stated that the tungsten bead type reduced felt recoil by 20% and that the stock weight increased by 600 grams. A lil more stock weight may be an added bonus if you are shooting a heavy recoiling rifle.
    Read on another forum that the oil and piston type was the only one that was completely silent when you tipped the rifle up and down.
    Can one of these types be installed in a McMillan Fiberglass stock or other type of fiberglass, graphite or synthetic stock. Seems that this would be a better alternative for folks that do not care for a muzzle brake. Any feedback would be appreciated. Thanks

  2. #2

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    I used to have a mercury recoil reducer. It made enough noise sloshing around, that I removed it from the stock. It just didn't seem worth it to me.

    My Blaser came with the tungston bead reducer. My 500 nitro express three inch double rifle has relatively mild recoil. I have never shot it without the kickstop, so I'm not sure how much it helps.

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    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nukalpiaq View Post
    Was just reading a lil about recoil reducers, basically 3 types; mercury, tungsten bead (type used by Blaser, called the Kickstop) and an oil and piston type.
    Have any of you forum members used either one of these types in a hunting rifle, and if so how effective are they at reducing felt recoil.
    Should they be installed by a gunsmith or can they be home installed?
    Just from my initial research Blaser's websites stated that the tungsten bead type reduced felt recoil by 20% and that the stock weight increased by 600 grams. A lil more stock weight may be an added bonus if you are shooting a heavy recoiling rifle.
    Read on another forum that the oil and piston type was the only one that was completely silent when you tipped the rifle up and down.
    Can one of these types be installed in a McMillan Fiberglass stock or other type of fiberglass, graphite or synthetic stock. Seems that this would be a better alternative for folks that do not care for a muzzle brake. Any feedback would be appreciated. Thanks
    I used mercury reducers in trap shooting for a short while. There are models that are drop in fits for particular shotguns, not sure about rifles. They did help with recoil, but since they weigh 8-16 ounces a piece I can't say they were more effective than a simple lead weight in the stock would have been. To sum up my experience, I tried them for a short while and left them out for better balance. They might be helpful on a heavy rifle but be careful to keep the balance right when you add them. To add them on a lightweight rifle would seem to me self defeating. They sometimes gurgle or slosh when shaken or tilted, but it is certainly not loud and I would not consider it a problem noise. They are fairly easy to "drop-in" and I suspect that a careful man with a proper bit and drill press should have no problem installing them.

    I think the Togiak Refuge office here in DLG purchased some aftermarket piston driven stocks for their 870 slug guns (3 inch foster type magnum loads). I looked at them closely and was at the range when they tried them out. Opinions were mixed on their performance among the officers, but to me they were ugly and the stock must be shortened considerably for them to be attached. I noticed that the guns moved a lot under recoil and couldn't help but think they would hinder quick follow up shooting as a bear protection slug gun might be called upon to perform.

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