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Thread: Gulf of Alaska Bycatch

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    Default Gulf of Alaska Bycatch

    thought I would pass this along from my friend at the Alaska Marine Concervation Council to anyone interested in expressing their views to the NPFMC

    A review of the discussion paper on GOA Tanner and Chinook bycatch is scheduled to come before the NPFMC meeting the 1st week in October. The full paper can be found on the Councilís website http://www.alaskafisheries.noaa.gov/npfmc

    At this juncture, and assuming the paper does not get bumped again due to lack of time, Council may choose to initiate a comprehensive analysis of measures to mitigate Tanner crab bycatch in GOA ground fish fisheries. There appears to be an interest to pursue measures for Tanner crab, due in part to the availability of ADF&G crab survey data illustrating abundance, but there may not be enough data to move forward with Chinook measures at this point.
    I wanted to encourage those of you who have been interested in this matter to please send a letter to the NPFMC and share your views. Letters to be included in Council membersí notebooks must be received by 5:00 pm on Monday; September 28th.Comments can be sent by fax to (907) 271-2817 and should be addressed as follows:


    Eric Olson, Chair

    North Pacific Fishery Management Council

    605 W. Fourth Ave.

    Anchorage, AK 99615

    RE: Agenda Item D-2 (b) Discussion paper on GOA Tanner and Chinook bycatch

    Thank you,

    Theresa Peterson

    Alaska Marine Conservation Council

    486-2991

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    Default great thread!

    Good idea to bring this to peoples attention!

    Bycatch is a very complicated problem in our fisheries. I thought I'd add some really interesting links that relate to the above post. I thought they might help anyone researching. Some are lonngg papers but really intersting and impact how NMFS figures out bycatch levels others are shorter. All are pretty neat IMO.

    http://www.fakr.noaa.gov/NPFMC/curre..._implan909.pdf


    http://www.fakr.noaa.gov/NPFMC/curre...tch_PSC909.pdf

    http://www.fakr.noaa.gov/NPFMC/curre...tchdata909.pdf

    http://www.fakr.noaa.gov/NPFMC/curre...nMotion609.pdf


    I can't brag to say I've read them all. I'm chewing my way through the first one, and have spot read the others. I'll be reading them as I can though and would like to hear anyone's thoughts. PM or here on the thread. Enjoy.

  3. #3

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    I don't think that a guy can grasp the concept of Bycatch until he spends a good deal of time on the water in and around commercial fisheries..


    My favorite this summer was watching Seiners bring up loads of cohos while trying to catch humpies.. Humpies were worth 22 cents a pound, and I think there were getting 13 cents for Coho. (seine caught cohos turn to mush) Yet the seiners kept making sets in high coho abundance areas, catching cohos the troll fleet could get $1.50 a pound for. Hmm.. And any guy worth his salt can tell you what a 3 day seine openers do for the number of kings/cohos in an area..

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    I had never heard that seine caught coho turned to mush.......do they then become unsellable? How about coho caught in a drift net?? Maybe some of the commercial fishermen on this forum could comment on the quality of fish based on how they are harvested.

    On a second note.....when did humpys command a higher price than coho? And where?

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by gusdog44 View Post
    I had never heard that seine caught coho turned to mush.......do they then become unsellable? How about coho caught in a drift net?? Maybe some of the commercial fishermen on this forum could comment on the quality of fish based on how they are harvested.

    On a second note.....when did humpys command a higher price than coho? And where?

    From what the comm fish guys told me.. The roe market is very strong, thus humpies getting a very good price. Cohos turn to mush when sucked through the pump.. It's all about how the fish is taken care of after it's been caught.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 270ti View Post
    I don't think that a guy can grasp the concept of Bycatch until he spends a good deal of time on the water in and around commercial fisheries..


    My favorite this summer was watching Seiners bring up loads of cohos while trying to catch humpies.. Humpies were worth 22 cents a pound, and I think there were getting 13 cents for Coho. (seine caught cohos turn to mush) Yet the seiners kept making sets in high coho abundance areas, catching cohos the troll fleet could get $1.50 a pound for. Hmm.. And any guy worth his salt can tell you what a 3 day seine openers do for the number of kings/cohos in an area..
    That's not bycatch.

    Fishermen are paid nothing for bycatch, and it can be a detriment to their quota. Bycatch, in general, is recognized and authorized by law as part of any commercial fishery. It is monitored and factored into allowable set quotas of the biomass by managers. The trick is to minimize it.

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    Exclamation Scandlous

    They say they do`nt catch crab or king salmon. I wonder who`s been checkin

    http://deckboss.blogspot.com/search/label/bycatch

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    That's quite a picture. Those bottom trawlers are nasty. I wonder if any of that crab was thrown back alive?

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    Default

    That pic is crazy. Lots of crab. If you really want to get a firm understanding of this very important issue I'd ask you to read the following Paper. One part of the successful management of our federal fisheries are the use of the Observer Program. That's one of the main ways NMFS collects bycatch data. There are some serious holes in the current system, and efforts are being made to correct them.

    If you think bycatch is a problem wouldn't you agree that solid, unbiased data should be used when discussing how much is to much? That if someone says say 100,000 crab...........would you want that number to be as close to 100,000 as possible? I'd say we as the public MUST expect the Council and NMFS to use the best possible data. If you do too, please read this paper, and make comments.

    http://www.alaskafisheries.noaa.gov/..._implan909.pdf




    PM me if you have any thoughts. or post. Have a great day!

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    ABF, you might know...can some of that crab be returned to the ocean? Also does bycathc come off the allowable harvest, as to not put unnecessary burden on the resource? Thanks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Grampyfishes View Post
    ABF, you might know...can some of that crab be returned to the ocean? Also does bycathc come off the allowable harvest, as to not put unnecessary burden on the resource? Thanks.
    Gramps...yes it is returned to the ocean, as far as I know. I don't think they can retain it at all. I don't know what kind of survival there is with crab bycatch, but I'm sure it varies a lot ( based on time of year/temp, size of codend, tow duration, handling on deck...). Akbrownsfan...is there an average mortality rate applied, as is with halibut bycatch?

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    Default good morning!

    Getting ready to go watch the Browns, so just a short answer.

    In Groundfish all salmon, halibut, herring, annd king and Tanner crab are considered prohibeted species and must be returned to the sea at the point of discard (sorting) as quickly as possible with minimul harm.

    so yes those crab had to be sorted out and returned.

    No mortality levels are used to my knowledge like Halibut. Not everything in the Gulf has a prohibited species quota or cap. I'll see which fisheries in the GOA has them. It's all tracked so please don't think that means that no one pays attention. The paper I linked above deals with ways to improve the data collected to better reflect actual fishing practices.

    I do know ADF&G is starting to study crab mortality as it relates to bycatch. From what I know it's just starting though.

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    Thanks ABF! Browns....all tied up in the 3rd.

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