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Thread: Mike Lardy seminar

  1. #1
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    Cool Mike Lardy seminar

    I'd like some feedback from anyone who has ever been to a Mike Lardy advanced transition seminar before. Likes/dislikes, was it well worth the money spent? Thanks in advance.

  2. #2

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    Talk to Bruce or Paula Ferg..
    I believe they have been.
    I'm contemplating the Rorem seminar in Florida or maybe the one in Texas. One is in Jan. the other in Feb. I think.
    I'll just be observing.

    Is this for yourself or is the clubs trying to get one up here for a seminar. That too would be awesome.

  3. #3
    Member Burke's Avatar
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    Default video

    I have seen his video series and they were well done. I imagine the live version would be better.

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    Default Mike Lardy

    Not definate but yes AWRC is looking to bring him and his wife up in June sometime for 4 days. I'd like to go either as handler or observer.
    Carol

  5. #5

    Thumbs up

    That would be awesome.

  6. #6
    Member 3CBRS's Avatar
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    Just got this from AWRC --Karen
    ------------------------------------------------------

    Anyone want to see Mike Lardy this summer?The one and only Mr. Mike Lardy is considering coming to Alaska, but before we commit to this AWESOME opportunity, the club would like to take a quick survey. We are SO EXCITED to offer a 3 day seminar (land and water marks and drills) for both handlers with dog (team), and observers. This would be an advanced seminar, which means, there is certain criteria your dog duo would have to meet. Would you be interested in being a handler for $650 or an observer for $385? Remember, this is what he charges in Wisconsin and in Georgia at his training facilities, this is your once in a lifetime opportunity to see Mr. Lardy in person on our home turf. Before we commit to bringing him up here we want to be sure there is enough serious dog trainers up here to support bringing him to Alaska.

    The dates would be July8-12th and would include 2 live flyers a day for handlers, a dinner sponsored by Purina with Mr. Lardy for participants. Remember, if you ever wanted to go see him at his training facilities, you would have to pay airfare, transportation and accommodations, so this is an incredible opportunity and savings!

    Feel free to visit his website to learn more about Mr. Lardy if you donít already know he is one of the top professional dog trainers, had several national champion dogs and offers a fantastic easy to follow dog training program. Visit his website www.totalretriever.com to view his full biography and learn some great dog training tips right from his site. For those of you who are just new at this game, you are being given an opportunity to observe one of the top national trainers, a rare opportunity, right here on our home turf. New trainers will get to learn and observe how Mr. Lardy trains, and why he does certain techniques and see where you are headed with your training, giving you a big picture outlook to dog training.

  7. #7
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    Default Seminar.

    I did one in the early 90's as an observe. I'd like to see his updated version. It's worth the money if you plan to go into field trials. Depending on where you are in training the logic may pass you at some point but you see some amazing work. When you watch the entire program there is a danger of working your own dog too fast.

    Each thing builds on another and I've seen people put too much on their dogs afterwards. But the best thing is that when you do see Lardy explain is phylosophy you'll be better equipt to assess the advice the local self-proclaimed experts are giving you. (Present company excluded :-) we know who we are talking about

    Some may disagree but for my dogs some of the transition and advanced techniques are unneeded and unnecessary. At a seminar you can decide if you want to pursue that route. The seminars are not a magic pill, it takes practice afterward, rereading notes and applying them to your particular dog.

    www.alaskadognews.com

  8. #8
    Member DucksAndDogs's Avatar
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    Default

    If I'm here, I'll be there as an observer.

  9. #9
    Member JuliW's Avatar
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    I would love to go....And last night found out that MSGDA is holding a NAHRA event the same weekend...They hold only two events a yr, so that means I have to make a decision which will not be easy.

    Juli
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    Default Tuffboots

    Let me weigh in on your conundrum. For years we also fought a short competitive season. Trial weekends were marked off of the calendar way in advance. Nothing got in the way. And at those trials we competed against people that had way more money, time, knowledge, and access to pros than we did. A lot of effort on our parts went into putting on events and not maximizing our dogs training and long term results.
    Regardless of where our dogs were at in their training, we would enter them. In hindsight, I think we did more of a disservice to the dogs and our efforts were short sighted.
    I'd suggest you look at the long term, not only for the dog/dogs you currently own, but at yourself. Are you the trainer you want to be? Do you have a complete program that fits you and that can be applied to all of the dogs you have had, or will have?
    I am not suggesting that Lardy is the end all in regards to training. But he has been successful in not only his personal training, but in the people that use him as a pro, and people who adopt his methods. Pro clinics in AK are few and far between.
    With that said, will I be there? I'm not sure yet. I've got a wonderful young dog that I am not sure how far I want to take. I have the knowledge to make her into a great hunting dog, and if we decide to compete, can have fun in the Qualifying Stakes.
    But if I want to campaign her, if I want to see just how far we as team can go, then I would be remiss not to take the few days out of the summer to expand my base so that we get the most out of our training over the next 6 or 8 years.
    Good luck in whatever you decide.

  11. #11

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    Thats an easy one tuffboots! I would choose the NAHRA event hands down. They are tons of fun and the club members are super friendly. I have never had a bad time there! But I am biased as I have no interest in field trials.
    Last edited by Woody; 10-15-2009 at 12:11. Reason: correct spelling error

  12. #12
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    Default

    Methods have changed and there are many techniques you'd learn with Lardy that will translate to NAHRA but in my experience Lardy field trial goals are way beyond anything you need in NAHRA. I have the 3 video cassette training set and I've never gotten much past transition for training to hunt or hunt tests. Like it or not Field trials are geared for high test Labradors to run 300 yard blinds. NAHRA does a lot more close work with different test set ups You would learn more at Lardy then the NAHRA test but it depends where you want to go. I'd take the Lardy training and customize it for my dog and needs. I'd like to see what's new and its been almost 2 decades - yikes http://www.alaskadognews.com

  13. #13

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    Going to a seminar is more than just teaching the dog. 90% of what you pick up is and will be handler related. A lot of issues identified will go all the way back to basic obedience. "AND" it won't be the dogs fault. Simply ....at the time... you didn't realize what the correct steps were in your dogs training. Therefore items are missed or weren't trained on enough. Trying to advance your dog too early when they weren't ready for that level of training.
    Yes, Lardy is a field trial pro which is why in his seminar setups it is focused for All Age series. But..... you take those same concepts and take the distance out of it and you can train on the same things you will see at any hunt test.
    Believe me there is no real magic to teaching distance. Once your dog has a grasp on handling factors (wind, water, cover, terrain) and learns the "concepts". Concepts being retired guns, multiple guns(doubles, triples, hip pocket, flower pot, in lines, down the shore), blinds over old falls, blinds past the flyer station, blinds under the arc and.... the list goes on....
    Once factors and concepts have been taught then extending out the distance is quite easy.

    Those that are interested in going don't forget to contact AWRC in the contact info listed ealier in this post. They need a head count to get things rolling.
    Here's the contact email alaskalabs@gmail.com
    Thanks

    Baron

  14. #14

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    I went to the AWRC banquet yesterday. They are still finalizing specifics for this seminar. They are looking to have applications available by January. Posted on the AWRC website with a link.

    Don't think that just because you don't run field trials that you aren't able to attend. This seminar is designed for dogs in transition and beyond.
    Transition is a building up of your dog to become a finished retriever. Teaching of multiple marks in conjuction with handling on blinds.

    There will be handler positions and observer slots available.
    Being a pro trainer myself I look forward to learning from one of the top trainers in the nation. What an opportunity !!!

    So stay posted !!!

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wetland Retrievers View Post
    Going to a seminar is more than just teaching the dog. 90% of what you pick up is and will be handler related. A lot of issues identified will go all the way back to basic obedience. "AND" it won't be the dogs fault. Simply ....at the time... you didn't realize what the correct steps were in your dogs training. Therefore items are missed or weren't trained on enough. Trying to advance your dog too early when they weren't ready for that level of training.
    Yes, Lardy is a field trial pro which is why in his seminar setups it is focused for All Age series. But..... you take those same concepts and take the distance out of it and you can train on the same things you will see at any hunt test.
    Believe me there is no real magic to teaching distance. Once your dog has a grasp on handling factors (wind, water, cover, terrain) and learns the "concepts". Concepts being retired guns, multiple guns(doubles, triples, hip pocket, flower pot, in lines, down the shore), blinds over old falls, blinds past the flyer station, blinds under the arc and.... the list goes on....
    Once factors and concepts have been taught then extending out the distance is quite easy.

    Those that are interested in going don't forget to contact AWRC in the contact info listed ealier in this post. They need a head count to get things rolling.
    Here's the contact email alaskalabs@gmail.com
    Thanks

    Baron

    I agree. I went to one of his seminars in WI a few years ago. Most of the handler issues are pretty applicable to HT's as well as FT's, no matter if they are AKC, NAHRA, or one of the other.

    Most shortcomings seem to come from handler error than anything else.

    I would encourage any to go if you have the opportunity.

  16. #16
    Member 3CBRS's Avatar
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    For details & registration, go to http://totalretriever.com/alaska/ The application deadline is March 1st. Cost is $650 for dog/handler team, or $325 for observers.


    "Handler-dog applications may be submitted until we receive 20 complete applications or until March 1, whichever comes first. We will select 12 teams from those applicants. Handler applicants will be notified of their acceptance no later than March 15.

    Handler-dog applicants are guaranteed an observer slot if they are not accepted for a handler slot, if they check the box on the general application. Some of these teams may be chosen to be on a Handlers Reserve waiting list to fill any cancellations."

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