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Thread: how do you line a canoe upriver??

  1. #1
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    Default how do you line a canoe upriver??

    Hey all,
    thinking about walking a pro pioneer up a river.
    How do you tie off to it so that it will track straight up river as I walk the bank?? Pretty sure it is called "lining a canoe".
    Thanks for the help
    Jason

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    Default Lining up

    there is a couple of wats to do it but the bottom line is to make it go forward an don't hit the bank

    # 1 if it is an open river an not much brush one person pulls on a long rope an the 2nd person keeps the bow out off the bank by a lond pole fixed to the bow push or pull depending on the river, an when you get to a place you have to cross both jump in an paddle to the other side an do it all over again

    # 2 if there is a keel on the canoe this way works fairley good, rope to bow an one to the stern then by bulling the bow or stern rope an let the water flow do its job keel will act like a sail an keep the canoe off the bank an up the river you go takes a little pratice to do it .

    # 3 use hipboots / waiders / swim trunks, jump in an walk it up, slow but it will work

    # 4 if it is a SQ end put a lift an motor on it, an motor up the river /stream
    the SQ end / lift / motor is a little more costly but it works the best an it is fairly fast

    there are 4 of my ways, there are afew more I think it all all depends on the river shallolw / deep / clear water / dark water time of year, [cold / warm]
    there no fast answer to the problem

    SID

  3. #3
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default It takes two baby...

    Quote Originally Posted by plentycoupe View Post
    Hey all,
    thinking about walking a pro pioneer up a river.
    How do you tie off to it so that it will track straight up river as I walk the bank?? Pretty sure it is called "lining a canoe".
    Thanks for the help
    Jason
    ... ideally anyway. But you can make a Y shaped yoke with a shorter branch fastened to the first thwart, and the longer branch tied to the stern. Throw the terminal end over your shoulder and pull. The length of the canoe ahead of the first thwart should offer resistance enough to keep the bow in the current. You will have to adjust each branch to get it to track correctly, so leave extra on each branch of the Y.

    Other people may have other methods. Canoes with keels track better. Sweepers are the big problem.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sid View Post
    there is a couple of wats to do it but the bottom line is to make it go forward an don't hit the bank

    # 1 if it is an open river an not much brush one person pulls on a long rope an the 2nd person keeps the bow out off the bank by a lond pole fixed to the bow push or pull depending on the river, an when you get to a place you have to cross both jump in an paddle to the other side an do it all over again

    # 2 if there is a keel on the canoe this way works fairley good, rope to bow an one to the stern then by bulling the bow or stern rope an let the water flow do its job keel will act like a sail an keep the canoe off the bank an up the river you go takes a little pratice to do it .

    # 3 use hipboots / waiders / swim trunks, jump in an walk it up, slow but it will work

    # 4 if it is a SQ end put a lift an motor on it, an motor up the river /stream
    the SQ end / lift / motor is a little more costly but it works the best an it is fairly fast

    there are 4 of my ways, there are afew more I think it all all depends on the river shallolw / deep / clear water / dark water time of year, [cold / warm]
    there no fast answer to the problem

    SID
    I prefer option #4, with option #3 as the backup when option #4 isn't possible for the conditions. Options #1 and #2 are way too......well....civilized and clean. You have to just jump in and get it done.

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    Default

    I've used all 4 of the above methods, and all have worked for me. I'll typically go with #3 if I can, otherwise, it's #2. #4 has occurred a time or two with the motor right to the stern (no lift), but I'd rather walk it by hand when it's shallow.

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    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    Default

    If this is a one-man operation then you tie the line back from the point of the bow...usually at the rear of the bow seat or at the forwardmost thwart. If you're familiar with the side-planes used by trollers then you get the idea.

    If you pull the canoe from the bow it will track to the bank, but if you tie farther back then the keel will act like a rudder with the bow "pulling away" from you. It will take some adjusting to get right but once you do it's fairly easy to keep the canoe tracking straight up stream.

    If you have the line to spare, two lines are better. The second is tied off at the stern. If the canoe begins to come in to the bank/shore you take up the stern line until it heads back out into the water.

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    Member Alaska Grandma's Avatar
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    Default

    Lining a canoe is not all that difficult. I've been doing it for years and if I can do it so can you...

    We use one length of rope- somewhere between 100 to 150 feet in length. The longer the better for me. Tie one end to the bow and the other to the stern. You will want to hold the rope just short of center with the bow of the canoe pointed just slightly out into the current for best pull and less likely the boat will come to shore. You may make a loop where you find the best spot for holding the rope where you like the canoe to track in the water so you can push the canoe out from shore and find that hold on the rope easier as it slides through your hands and as you start to walk forward. Some folks wrap a piece of fabric there to mark that spot and to make it easier on your hands...

    A few pictures are worth a thousand words...so here ya go...my son lining the river.







    Continued next post
    Grandma Lori
    If God had intended us to follow recipes,
    He wouldn't have given us grandmothers. ~Linda Henley

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    Member Alaska Grandma's Avatar
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    There could be a few places where it is shallow and you will have to walk in the water no matter how long your rope is...




    Good idea to make a poling pole (a long thin, but stout smooth pole) for some of those places you just can't get around (a small log jam, a deep creek entrance, or the tip of an island). With a little practice poling isn't too hard and can actually be faster in places...




    Hope this helps some, at least you can get the picture
    Lining is fun and a great way to really see a river and all the tracks and find fossils etc...
    Grandma Lori
    If God had intended us to follow recipes,
    He wouldn't have given us grandmothers. ~Linda Henley

  9. #9
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    great pictures!

    I have a few things to add.......

    If you are lining a square sterned canoe....like AKGrandma mentioned....a nice long rope attached to the front.......that will reach all the way to the stern. Then...you have infinite slack to mess with depending how far out you want the canoe...or how close. Use a carabiner to attach the end of the rope to the stern. It's also very important to have a couple D-rings adhered to the outsides of your stern (D-ring on both sides) near the WATER LEVEL. These D-rings allow you to line on the right or left side of the canoe. A lining sleeve intalled in the front of your canoe is a must......and a double ender can actually have a lining sleeve intalled to the front and the rear (no need for D-rings like with a square stern). I use 1", or 3/4" pvc pipe that has been cut to take the shape of the canoe. I usually install it 1/3 of the way down the bow and glued to a water tight fit. This allows the ropes to pull close to the water level. This bow rope gets strapped neatly under the handle always ready when needed. Ive included a pic of a lining sleeve.......it isnt all the great but you can see it's location. D rings should also be glued to the exterior too....they werent installed yet on my second square stern....sorry....no pic yet. A lining sleeve is a MUST HAVE. I wish that I could post more pics regarding the process of equipping a canoe for lining.....but soon enough. Hope this helps all who want to line a canoe, and if anyone need further info or help with lining sleeves, d-rings, or making sure they are proper on your canoe....let me know....i get excited bout canoe stuff

    one more thing.....if you have a handsome and well-crafted scott freighter....it may be more appealing to install a BRASS lining sleeve....and pollish it to perfection. Ditch the idea of pvc if your canoe is not made of royalex or polylink3.

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    Default lining sleeve and D rings (and a lift, oh my)

    Lets talk some more about the lining sleeve, and also the best way to attach D rings at water level - but after you're back here. I've got a fair number of things that I want to get done to my Albany this winter.

    Have you run across another freighter guy in the Anchorage area looking to get a lift made? I'd like to split the transportation costs to get mine and another canoe up to Fairbanks - to leave there for a few weeks - to get that done this winter. No more foolin' around...

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