Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: What kind of insect is this?

  1. #1
    Member scott_rn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    power commuting twixt the valley and anchorage
    Posts
    803

    Default What kind of insect is this?


    I caught a couple of trout today on wooly buggers and took one home for dinner. I gutted the fish and want to see what it had been eating and I ended up with a writhing pile of these guys.

    What is it & what would you recommend tying up to imitate it?

  2. #2
    Member Phish Finder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Searching for more cowbell!
    Posts
    1,945

    Default

    I have to give props to anyone who can determine what that is from the pic.

    As for tying, a tiny tube fly may work.
    ><((((>.`..`.. ><((((>`..`.><((((>

    "People who drink light 'beer' don't like the taste of beer; they
    just like to pee a lot." --Capitol Brewery

  3. #3
    Member homerdave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    homer, alaska
    Posts
    3,922

    Cool much as it irks me to admit...

    powdermonkey probably knows.
    i think those are midge larvae of some sort.
    how big are they?
    Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
    http://www.alaskabackcountryhunters.org/

  4. #4

    Default

    They're some type of midge larva. A class of mine has collected several buckets of water and pond animals using nets from near school. Such creatures were very common. I kept a bucket over the weekend once and dozens of adult midges hatched out. We've had mosquitoes hatch as well, but they look quite different.

    Make sure you cover the bucket overnight if you do this at home.

  5. #5
    Member scott_rn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    power commuting twixt the valley and anchorage
    Posts
    803

    Default

    Sorry the picture isn't so good, my newer camera is shipped off for warranty repairs (2-4 weeks). They're in the neighborhood of 5/8 to 3/4 of an inch long.

    Thanks for the suggestion AKGunner. Right after I posted the picture I thought I ought to just let them hatch, keeping them covered probably saved me a headache or two.

  6. #6
    Member Phish Finder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Searching for more cowbell!
    Posts
    1,945

    Default

    That's a great idea.
    Scott, if they are still alive, throw them in a bucket of water and cover with some mesh. That way, you'll know for sure what they are
    ><((((>.`..`.. ><((((>`..`.><((((>

    "People who drink light 'beer' don't like the taste of beer; they
    just like to pee a lot." --Capitol Brewery

  7. #7
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River/ Juneau
    Posts
    5,154

    Default

    looks like a midge larvae to me, in larger sizes (12-16) they are also called coronomids (sp??) most folk imitate them with flies like the zebra midge, basically a scud hook with white tread and black wire for ribbing, maybe a bead. They are typically fished right off the bottom under a bobbercator or in the surface film when bugs are hatching. I've found that they are very effective in the mid summer when nothing seems to be happening or the fish seem to not be hitting woolly buggers. This time of year is bugger city though, pound the banks, look for cruisers. Man I miss fall lake fishing up there so much
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    79

    Default

    Rainbows in lakes are really hitting both wooly buggers and chronomids right now. The chronomids actually seemed a little hotter than the wooly buggers for me, but both caught fish.

  9. #9
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River/ Juneau
    Posts
    5,154

    Default

    I'd say chronies probably work great all year long, they are just super boring to fish IMO I'd rather troll cast and cover water...
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    79

    Default

    A black leech and a sculpin pattern were the ticket today. Small stuff didn't attract any attention.

    Midges were still hatching though. Maybe the cold night last night limited the fish feeding.

  11. #11
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,162

    Default More midge larva info for Fall fishing...

    Phantom midge larva?
    http://www.naturegrid.org.uk/pondexp...y/phantom.html

    Rheotanytarsus midge larva?
    http://www.troutnut.com/specimen/670

    And tying up a fly:
    http://www.faqs.org/fly-tying/Nymphs/Midge-Larva.html

    I like APM's idea of a scud hook.
    Sounds like something to consider for Fall fish.

  12. #12
    Member scott_rn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    power commuting twixt the valley and anchorage
    Posts
    803

    Default

    It's got to be the phantom midge larva. They sat in a cup in my kitchen for about three weeks but never hatched, just developed scum on top of the water.

    They were fairly translucent, which makes me wonder what would imitate them best when tying up a pattern. I guess a zebra midge like akpm suggested.

  13. #13
    hap
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Arctic Grayling View Post
    Rainbows in lakes are really hitting both wooly buggers and chronomids right now. The chronomids actually seemed a little hotter than the wooly buggers for me, but both caught fish.
    It is "Chironomid" from the Greek and related to words like chiropractor... But actually comes from a longer root meaning "one who gestures with his hands"... Because they often hover in clouds and need sweeping away with the hands regularly...

  14. #14

    Default another theory....

    "a writhing pile"

    If these were still alive, especially if you gutted them at home, my bet is that they were some kind of internal parasite....

    My two bits.

    L

  15. #15
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,162

    Default Hmm, a mystery... Pearl EZ Body to tie some up?

    ...like this: http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/te...546&hasJS=true. And try fishing the flies at the same time of year? Might be on to something. Small v-rib might work too for tying some up.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •