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Thread: Bi-pod Question

  1. #1
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    Default Bi-pod Question

    Having never used one of these I am looking for input. My daughter shot her first moose this year and now is hooked on big game hunting. She struggled for a good shot in the high grass this year and would have benefited from some type of rest. Any suggestions as to what the options are and pros and cons? (Brand names and or models would help) It needs to attach to a Winchester Model 70 and be simple to use. Thanks for any input
    Last edited by rambling raven; 09-22-2009 at 10:12. Reason: addition

  2. #2
    Premium Member MarineHawk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rambling raven View Post
    Having never used one of these I am looking for input. My daughter shot her first moose this year and now is hooked on big game hunting. She struggled for a good shot in the high grass this year and would have benefited from some type of rest. Any suggestions as to what the options are and pros and cons? (Brand names and or models would help) It needs to attach to a Winchester Model 70 and be simple to use. Thanks for any input
    Harris Bipods are the way to go.

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    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rambling raven View Post
    Having never used one of these I am looking for input. My daughter shot her first moose this year and now is hooked on big game hunting. She struggled for a good shot in the high grass this year and would have benefited from some type of rest. Any suggestions as to what the options are and pros and cons? (Brand names and or models would help) It needs to attach to a Winchester Model 70 and be simple to use. Thanks for any input
    I can recommend Harris bipods for their stability and ease of use in the prone and sitting position. They attach to the sling swivel on most rifles and are simple to install and remove. I have experienced shifts in zero with them in place on some rifles so be careful to check zero with and without the bipod if you choose to use them. Bipods can allow more accurate shooting, but they are fairly heavy and very cumbersome on a hunting rifle. They can also be slow to employ while preparing for a shot. Instead of a bipod I would consider some type of folding shooting sticks for hunting in AK. They are not quite as solid as a bipod, but they are quicker, generally more flexible in shooting height/positions and can be carried on your belt, or by a hunting partner, out of the way until you need them. Stoney Point makes several varieties for various shooting positions and differing heights. Theirs are of good quality, but others make them as well.

    My favorite shooting enhancement add-on is the tried and true sling. It can be a dedicated shooting sling which adds an incredible amount of stability or you can teach her how to use a "hasty" sling that will provide some support. While hunting in AK I personally prefer carrying only a sling and searching for some type of natural rest for more stability if I can find it.

    In addition to these shooting aids, make certain your daughter is practicing from dedicated shooting positions (standing, kneeling, sitting & prone) to develop the needed skills and confidence to shoot in the field. It is easy to shoot a lot, but only from a bench or from some type of rest and not develop the necessary shooting reflexes to be confident from other positions. It's great to hear of your daughter's success and I hope these suggestions make her a better hunter/shooter.

  4. #4

    Default Bog Tripod

    I have used a bipod but prefer the Bog's Tripod. I did a shot on an Axis doe at 160 yards using the Bog's tripod. Kept me steady and are light to carry. Fast to adjust to the height you need too

  5. #5
    Member Diesel Nut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1Cor15:19 View Post
    I can recommend Harris bipods for their stability and ease of use in the prone and sitting position.
    Harris makes the best non-tactical bipods out there, bar none. I've used them with great success anywhere I can get a prone shot. Not so handy with the sitting or kneeling, as they start to get cumbersome and heavy when they're big enough to extend that far.

    Quote Originally Posted by 1Cor15:19 View Post
    Instead of a bipod I would consider some type of folding shooting sticks for hunting in AK. They are not quite as solid as a bipod, but they are quicker, generally more flexible in shooting height/positions and can be carried on your belt, or by a hunting partner, out of the way until you need them. Stoney Point makes several varieties for various shooting positions and differing heights. Theirs are of good quality, but others make them as well.
    Love my Stoney Point. It attaches and detaches without buttons or levers, folds together for ease of carrying, and extends from 22" (or so) to 44" (or so). I can shoot sitting, kneeling and if I'm shooting up a steep hill, even standing. They're not quite as stable as a fixed bipod from the prone position, but they're certainly more stable than offhand or the traditional sitting/kneeling shooting positions.

    Quote Originally Posted by 1Cor15:19 View Post
    My favorite shooting enhancement add-on is the tried and true sling. It can be a dedicated shooting sling which adds an incredible amount of stability or you can teach her how to use a "hasty" sling that will provide some support. While hunting in AK I personally prefer carrying only a sling and searching for some type of natural rest for more stability if I can find it.
    Tried and true methods are slowly losing out to technological advances. I grew up shooting with a sling, but most today consider it useful only in that it carries a rifle over their shoulder (something I don't do anyway). I agree that a good sling and proper stance can add 50yds of accuracy to an offhand shot.

    Quote Originally Posted by 1Cor15:19 View Post
    In addition to these shooting aids, make certain your daughter is practicing from dedicated shooting positions (standing, kneeling, sitting & prone) to develop the needed skills and confidence to shoot in the field. It is easy to shoot a lot, but only from a bench or from some type of rest and not develop the necessary shooting reflexes to be confident from other positions. It's great to hear of your daughter's success and I hope these suggestions make her a better hunter/shooter.
    My emphasis added. Nothing else will better prepare a hunter to take quick, accurate, lethal and ethical shots than actually practicing from the field positions. I learned on the range that 120yds was my limit for offhand. Give me a tree branch or something sturdy to lean on, and that extends out to 180yds. If I can get into a strong seated position with a good bone bridge I can shoot 9" paper plates at 500yds, which is about 200yds further then I'll actually pull the trigger on a large game animal. The benefit of knowing I can shoot 500yds is faith in the weapon system's (me, rifle, optic and ammo) ability to put the bullet where it needs to go; something that should never be underestimated and only achieved through practice.

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    For standing shots my daughter (14) uses a Stoney Point walking stick with a v-rifle rest on top, as does my son. Once she started shooting with it regularly she became quick with it to get on target. Since my family is big on carrying walking sticks for all kinds of hiking it was a natural choice.
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