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Thread: Hunter attacked by rabid wolf

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    Default Hunter attacked by rabid wolf

    Don't know if this has been posted or not, my apologies if it has. Just saw it in the News Miner and thought it was interesting. Not really sure why the guy would go walking down a river at 2 am with his rifle. Not something I would do...JMO though

    Alaska hunter attacked by rabid wolf, survives

    The Associated Press
    Originally published Saturday, September 19, 2009 at 3:50 p.m.
    Updated Saturday, September 19, 2009 at 7:04 p.m.
    ANCHORAGE, Alaska - An Alaskan hunter has survived a rare attack by a rabid wolf.

    Roderick Phillip, 35, was at a bonfire near Kalskag with three hunting partners earlier this month when he went down to the nearby Kuskokwim River to look for moose. It was around 2 a.m.

    Alone, without his gun, Phillip noticed a white figure lurking near the campsite. He saw it was a wolf and yelled "wolf!" to alert his hunting partners. His yell caught the animal's attention and it lunged at Phillip full-speed, biting him on the leg.

    The wolf and Phillip wrestled for a few moments before Phillip's brother shot the animal with a rifle, killing it. They later learned the wolf was rabid.
    "When it bit me, it felt like somebody grabbed me on the skin. It didn't feel like a bite," Phillip told the Anchorage Daily News on Friday. "As soon as it bit me, I took my right arm and put it on the wolf's neck and turned down on the ground. I was on top of him and choking him at the same time I had my shoulder pushing down toward him. I didn't want to let it go."
    Phillip said he received a shipment of rabies vaccine. He will need five shots over 28 days to ward off the disease. His leg wounds were not serious.

    Wolf attacks on humans are rare, and the known cases almost always involve wolves that are rabid or otherwise sick, said Kimberlee Beckmen of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game.

    Phillip's attack was the second time in recent years a rabid wolf has attacked a person or animals in Southwest Alaska. In 2007, a pack of rabid wolves killed a half-dozen dogs in a village.
    There have been 19 confirmed cases of rabies in wolves in Alaska since 1971, Beckmen said.

    The disease is more common among foxes, she said.

    "That area - down on the Yukon-Kuskokwim area - has red fox rabies every year," Beckmen said. "When they're actually clinical with rabies, they are biting at anything that moves. In fact, it doesn't even have to be an animate object. They just bite indiscriminately. And it's because their brain is inflamed."

    As rabies progresses, Beckmen said, animals lose fear of people and eventually die of seizures.

  2. #2

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    Another good reason to take these rascals out of the eco-system. They are bad at carrying all kinds of disease and parasites. Thank goodness that his brother had good judgement. If every hunter would just kill one wolf when they get the chance, we would not reading this kind of terrible news. Hunters better start waking up and taking care of predators, like their kin used to.
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    We are top predator........

    Waste no time, kill everything.
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

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    More reason to kill wolves...
    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

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    Not so much 'top predator' without that 'piece' of metal. But,, the way it 'reads' the human was getting the upper hand,, on a 'lone wolf'.

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    If presented with the chance, do not get me wrong, I would love to get a wolf or fox, however, every animal has niche to fill and inturn play a key role in maintaing a healthy ecosystem. I think they should be controlled not completely eliminated. Disease is a natural way to eliminate predators or any animals with an inferior genetic make-up.

    "I Envy Him And Him Only, That Catches More Fish Than I Do" Izaac Walton 1653
    The question of hunting is not a matter of life or death... it's more important than that

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    I am not a wolf supporter ever since a good friend took me snowmachining several years ago. We found 3 dead moose in a 300 yard span, and hardly anything was eaten off those moose. To me, that is a waste that is unacceptable by man or beast.

    Wanna know the good news? My friend set snares around those kills, and got 7 wolves in one day.
    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

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    AK Trout,

    I'm wondering if the fellow attacked by the rabid wolf is just a predator,
    or might be genitically 'flawed' also.?

    I would not consider myself as having an 'inferior genetic makeup',, if a wolf was to transmit rabies to me by chewing on my leg.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DEDWUF View Post
    AK Trout,

    I'm wondering if the fellow attacked by the rabid wolf is just a predator,
    or might be genitically 'flawed' also.?

    I would not consider myself as having an 'inferior genetic makeup',, if a wolf was to transmit rabies to me by chewing on my leg.
    Good Point.

    And, the story makes the case for ALWAYS having a gun available when you're in the boonies. I betcha he wishes he did.


    I most always do, and now I'm reminded to.


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    Quote Originally Posted by AK Trout View Post
    every animal has niche to fill and inturn play a key role in maintaing a healthy ecosystem. I think they should be controlled not completely eliminated. Disease is a natural way to eliminate predators or any animals with an inferior genetic make-up.
    That's the kind of stuff you hear from the Environmental Wacko, crowd. Where they get that, I shore dunno.


    Doesn't "Disease" "eliminate" ALL KINDS of animals and people without regard to their "genetic make-up"??


    Isn't it bad enuff to be "eliminated"? Do we hafta be characterized as having "an inferior genetic make-up", too?



    It adds insult to injury. Well, go ahead, if I'm dead, but for the sake of those I leave behind, pleese, don't put it in my obituary.


    Smitty of the North
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    Some fuel for thought. Humans always go for the healthiest, best-looking animals. Wolves also play an important role in taking out the old, sick, "genetically inferior" animals you don't want to kill. That's not to say wolves don't sometimes kill indiscriminately or kill large amounts of young animals. They can and do. But, if you only kill the healthiest animals in the population (as would occur in the absence of wolves), you're weeding out the best genes and eventually in the future, you'd probably end up with a whole hell of a lot of screwed up animals. Not to mention the possibility of increased amounts of disease due to more sick animals being around (since humans don't want to eat those ones), and overpopulation if people can't take as many animals as the predators did. Wolves aren't angels, but they're not all bad.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Smitty of the North View Post
    That's the kind of stuff you hear from the Environmental Wacko, crowd. Where they get that, I shore dunno.Smitty of the North
    Not all envirnomental wackos talk like this. Sorry for going all scientific on ya, and sorry for my background in biology. I'm just stating a point, but if you like to jump down my throat for trying to contribtue something that is worth saying be my guess. I have hunted and fished alaska since I was a little boy, I run a trap line. So good call, you hit it on the nose. I have envirnomental wacko written all over me. God your good. I know you did not say i was an envirnomental wacko smitty but your sure implying it.

    "I Envy Him And Him Only, That Catches More Fish Than I Do" Izaac Walton 1653
    The question of hunting is not a matter of life or death... it's more important than that

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    Quote Originally Posted by whitewolf2025 View Post
    Some fuel for thought. Humans always go for the healthiest, best-looking animals. Wolves also play an important role in taking out the old, sick, "genetically inferior" animals you don't want to kill. That's not to say wolves don't sometimes kill indiscriminately or kill large amounts of young animals. They can and do.
    This is the kind of stuff you find on the Discovery channel. The wolves taking only the sick, young and old is pure uneducated BS. So is the theory they only kill to eat. I don't whether to LMAO whenever I hear this from somebody or throw a rock at them
    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

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    Quote Originally Posted by whitewolf2025 View Post
    Some fuel for thought. Humans always go for the healthiest, best-looking animals. Wolves also play an important role in taking out the old, sick, "genetically inferior" animals you don't want to kill. That's not to say wolves don't sometimes kill indiscriminately or kill large amounts of young animals. They can and do. But, if you only kill the healthiest animals in the population (as would occur in the absence of wolves), you're weeding out the best genes and eventually in the future, you'd probably end up with a whole hell of a lot of screwed up animals. Not to mention the possibility of increased amounts of disease due to more sick animals being around (since humans don't want to eat those ones), and overpopulation if people can't take as many animals as the predators did. Wolves aren't angels, but they're not all bad.
    This is something that I used to buy into a great deal but honestly my time in the field has shown me something quite different. Wolves are brilliant hunters and are cunning as individual hunters and nearly unstoppable as a pack. They look not for so called sick or old prey but rather any opportunity that gives them the advantage. Wolves are much lighter than the large ungulates they hunt and will drive even large bulls into deep snow then tear out the tendons on the rear legs. I have found untouched carcasses where the wolves ripped out the tendons on the hind leg to the point that joint failed and the bone was exposed.
    Hunting regulations are developed w/ the intent of minimizing the impact on the population while providing a sustainable harvest. This is why the taking of only certain bulls is under S/F 50regulations for moose is the standard for general harvest across much of the state. Cows and other any bull tags are regulated through the draw system and based on animal density serveys as well as bull cow ratio estimates.
    We concentrate on Bulls with the knowledge that multiple cows can be bred by each bull. Conversly wolves concentrate on calves which are slower and weaker durring their early months. When you add in snow fall the shorter calves have the hardest time getting through the snow so they are still the primary target. Honest studies show that most moose will not make it through their second year of life, this is not a genetic or disease related weakness this is simply a developmental weakness and one that all moose must grow through.

    Wolves are very intelligent dogs. They have developed into skilled pack hunters but to try and sell them as having some artificial morality is simply not accurate. They are just as capable of thrill killing as any neighborhood pack of dogs.

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    I hunt Wolves.

    Finding a carcass that was left by Wolves is a bait too tempting to leave without snares, a trap or two , or finding a good high spot to keep an eye on it and check for their return.

    My experiance is that when we find dead animals, and most definitly Wolf kills, that we watch that carcass, and 100% of the time they return to eat. They will return to eat untill that carcass is gone. They will come back and eat the dried up skin in summer.

    like the Pike_place previously said, 3 dead Moose, and his buddie got 7 Wolves that came back....had time progressed, they would have eaten all three.


    Why? Because a Wolf cant eat an entire Moose in one sitting.....even a pack cannot.


    When we have shown up to a Kill, and the tounge is gone, the ass fat eaten, its a faily good bet that the Wolves left because we arrived during their first meal.
    Scatter'd bones and hide.....we still watch , as the Wolves will return when they are hungry enough.


    Not many humans buy food, meal to meal....we too obtain more than we eat and return to the fridge.....when you go to a kill site and screw around, all you doing is spoiling a good bait with your scent and tracks, and you might keep those leery suckers away. We smear Lynx piss on our boot bottoms when we set up snares/traps, so we dont drive them from that kill.

    Perfectly healthy animals can become lame, wounded or sick as well, and certainly a wolf will take advantage of that.

    Well, thats what I've seen, and what we do to be sucessfull at Wolf hunting.
    Wach herd is strong and theres plenty of wolves. This herd has been healthy and strong for years, despite bad weather die offs. I think the Wolves have a hand in that and I for one am glad.


    We have rabies in this area, and have for thousands of years..... and old Eskimo storys about such.
    The last person killed here in living memeory was my father in laws father in law, Punekok Sampson, who died from rabies he contracted from a rabid Wolf attack on his dogteam, by a lone rabid Wolf.....about 60 years ago.
    Usually its rabid Fox, and there are plenty.

    Your experiance is your own, however that may vary.
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

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    Quote Originally Posted by pike_palace View Post
    This is the kind of stuff you find on the Discovery channel. The wolves taking only the sick, young and old is pure uneducated BS. So is the theory they only kill to eat. I don't whether to LMAO whenever I hear this from somebody or throw a rock at them
    Quote Originally Posted by whitewolf2025 View Post
    That's not to say wolves don't sometimes kill indiscriminately or kill large amounts of young animals. They can and do.
    Thank you for the rocks, pike_palace. I use them to build big fortresses to keep you out. The information I'm presenting here **** well better be worth two ****s, considering I'm paying enough money to get a degree in wildlife biology. As you can see from my statement, I did not say that wolves only take sick, old animals. Wolves kill when the opportunity presents itself, whether the animal be healthy or not. But, the opportunity to take animals you don't want sometimes presents itself.

    Seriously, Kill 'Em All makes for a better Metallica record then a wildlife management slogan.

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    Agreed,,, wolves ARE opportunistic hunters.

    Area to 'area', feeding habits are basically same. Keep in mind when its averaging -25, plenty of, esp. caribou, wolves can and will 'gorge' themselves much easier with warm fresh meat vs cold frozen meat.
    I've seen what wolves can do in the spring following herds of pregnant cow caribou, 'abortion' specialists,,, no 'harm to mom except mortal entry/calf exit.

    Books are great !!
    Field experience is also,,,its "hands/eyes on".


    Stranger,
    I remember when BOG member "Sampson" corrected some wolf "experts" at a BOG meeting around 2002?, he told the story about not all wolf attacks are reported or well documented, especially history of wolf attacks in the not so past.
    It was great, esp. coming from a good MAN.

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    I'll just stick with telling about the best way I know to deal with "Kill'ed and left by Wolves" carcass's or a rabies epidemic.....
    They always return to eat, and thats the easiest way to hunt them; sit and wait, or let traps/snares do that for ya .
    Hell....hunt them for any and all reasons....I hunt them for fun and profit!! and I dont eat them.


    The Caribou solved the "Wolf at the back door" problem eons ago.....they all calf at the same time, at least with in 2-3 days, and the whole herd has had its baby.
    That floods the" table" with more meat than the Bears, Wolves, Eagles and such can eat, and that way they only get a small percentage, before they can run like hell, and have a chance.

    Life aint fair, even for Caribou, and as a predator, I take away all the advantage I can, and my rifle extends my will.......far better than my legs and teeth.

    I do remember Walter S talking "Wolf" though I can recall the one and only story I know of about a Rabid Wolf, who killed his Grandfather.

    Fact is, I know of a great many Wolf `vs` Dog attacks, as Wolves see a dog team as an intruding pack, and many a musher has shot the Wolves that were closing up on their trail.(lucky guys....pelts for home and $$) Even camped guys who woke up to Wolves killing their chained dogs werent attacked, and Ive never been bitten, even when I backax'd a few in snares. They just dont put up a fight and I find that strange, but its the truth.

    Fewer Dogteams nowadays, anyways, still plenty of Wolves.


    Caribou dont get to die in their sleep...maby only humans do......everything else dies being EATEN ALIVE and I cant find a thought in my head that says thats a pretty sight or painless ....... least of all "Humane" ~~LOL!!~~
    Wolfs kill the weak and old Wolves....

    Rabies, AIDS, Distemper, Brucillocious.....disease is awhole different relm. Thank God its rare.
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

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    You don't eat them?


    Good thing 'nature' makes big amounts of caribou, cause the wolves like to
    keep there bellys full before calving days.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AK Trout View Post
    Not all envirnomental wackos talk like this. Sorry for going all scientific on ya, and sorry for my background in biology. I'm just stating a point, but if you like to jump down my throat for trying to contribtue something that is worth saying be my guess. I have hunted and fished alaska since I was a little boy, I run a trap line. So good call, you hit it on the nose. I have envirnomental wacko written all over me. God your good. I know you did not say i was an envirnomental wacko smitty but your sure implying it.
    Pardon me AK Trout:

    I didn't think you were gonna interpret my remarks as jumping down your throat.

    If I implied anything with my attempt at humor, it would be that you've bought into the Environmental Wacko LINE.

    Which, isn't IMO, Science, or Biology, no matter what you were taught.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
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