Results 1 to 19 of 19

Thread: shooting slugs

  1. #1
    Member scott_rn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    power commuting twixt the valley and anchorage
    Posts
    803

    Default shooting slugs

    I've got a remington 870 express, what is the best way to shoot slugs through it?

    I bought a rifled rem choke on the recommendation of one of the guys at SW, can I shoot lead (not hard cast) rifled slugs through it or do they need to be smooth?

    Is it worth buying a slug barrel at some point?

    Thanks,
    Scott

  2. #2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by scott_rn View Post

    Is it worth buying a slug barrel at some point?

    Thanks,
    Scott
    All second hand and looking over shoulders, but if you're looking for extended range performance, then I'd sure buy one (Hastings). I've got relations in the midwest that hunt with slugs, and accoring to them, while the screw-in choke is so-so, the rifled barrels are excellent. I watched them shoot some 100 yard groups that really opened my eyes to what a rifled slug gun can do with the right ammo.

    Can't advise you on the best slugs for your gun, other than to try lots and find which one your gun shoots best. I don't know of any advisories against a particular brand or model fro your rifled choke, but I'd look elsewhere than SW for advice. You might get a perfectly knowledgeable clerk, but more likely you'll get someone whose only shooting experience is using the coke machine at McDonalds.

  3. #3
    Member markopolo50's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Fenton,Michigan
    Posts
    838

    Default Slugs

    I agree with Brownbear, the screw in choke with the rifling isn't that great. I have thought the idea was an afterthought. I think the slug, upon reaching the rifling, must twist rather fast and up to that point slow or not at all, so what that does to accuracy is questionable. However you can shoot both types of slugs through the tube, foster and sabot.

    I would definately buy a rifled slug barrel with a cantilever scope mount on it. A good slug is the Remington Core Lokt
    http://www.remington.com/products/am...nded_sabot.asp I live in a shotgun only area and my brother and brother in law use these slug with very good results. I travel farther north where we can use rifles, so I haven't used slugs in quite a few years.

    Check out which one shoots best as they are like other ammo, some shoot well and others don't.

    Remington also makes a combo slug barrel/scope set up which may be a good setup.
    http://www.remington.com/products/fi...ry_barrels.asp
    #24553 is the 12 ga, called a "clampack" because of the packaging.

    Hope this helps and good luck, Mark
    Last edited by markopolo50; 09-19-2009 at 06:02. Reason: spelling

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    All second hand and looking over shoulders, but if you're looking for extended range performance, then I'd sure buy one (Hastings). I've got relations in the midwest that hunt with slugs, and accoring to them, while the screw-in choke is so-so, the rifled barrels are excellent. I watched them shoot some 100 yard groups that really opened my eyes to what a rifled slug gun can do with the right ammo.

    Can't advise you on the best slugs for your gun, other than to try lots and find which one your gun shoots best. I don't know of any advisories against a particular brand or model fro your rifled choke, but I'd look elsewhere than SW for advice. You might get a perfectly knowledgeable clerk, but more likely you'll get someone whose only shooting experience is using the coke machine at McDonalds.
    I agree with you on this one. I still can't stop laughing after reading the last two sentences.

  5. #5
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Wrangell
    Posts
    7,600

    Default

    Slugs are made to be shot through a smooth bore and sabots through rifled. Your slugs will also recoil less through the smoth bore as their movement at the choke is not disrupted as much

  6. #6
    Member Eastwoods's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Southern Tier, New York
    Posts
    430

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by scott_rn View Post
    I've got a remington 870 express, what is the best way to shoot slugs through it?

    I bought a rifled rem choke on the recommendation of one of the guys at SW, can I shoot lead (not hard cast) rifled slugs through it or do they need to be smooth?

    Is it worth buying a slug barrel at some point?

    Thanks,
    Scott

    If your rifled choke tube shoots accurate (my definition of accurate for a slug gun is 4" or less at 100 yrds) then there is no need to buy a rifled barrel IMHO. Unless you want the slightly extended range by using saboted slugs, then a rifled slug barrel is better to stabilize them.
    Yes, you can use rifled slugs though a rifled choke tube or rifled barrel with good accuracy. I've used plain jain winchester slugs(foster type) with good accuracy.
    By the way, the extra 50 yards (ie. 150 yard range) you can get from saboted slugs is from the higher retained velocity/energy, not just the accuracy.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southwest Alaska
    Posts
    2,145

    Default

    I had the original barrel of my Mossberg 590A1 threaded for chokes and found an improved cylinder would give me slightly tighter groups using Remington 3" Buckhammers.
    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocre minds. The latter cannot understand it when a man does not thoughtlessly submit to hereditary prejudices but honestly and courageously uses his intelligence. Albert Einstein

    Better living through chemistry (I'm a chemist)

    You can piddle with the puppies, or run with the wolves...

  8. #8
    Member JOAT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Soldotna, ALASKA since '78
    Posts
    3,720

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by scott_rn View Post
    I've got a remington 870 express, what is the best way to shoot slugs through it?
    Typically, you put a shell loaded with a slug into the breech of the gun, close the action, point at something you want a 3/4" hole in, and pull the trigger.

    I bought a rifled rem choke on the recommendation of one of the guys at SW...
    Don't use it. Take it back to SW and get your money back. You got a very bad recommendation from the guys at SW. Rifled choke tubes are worthless.

    Is it worth buying a slug barrel at some point?
    Depends. You never stated what you're going to be shooting it at. Is this a plinker? Home defense gun? Bear defense gun? If any of these, you don't need anything more than the smooth bore the gun was born with.

    If you're going to use it for longer range hunting (deer and such at over ~60 yards), then you'll get some benefit from a fully rifled barrel coupled with sabot slugs. Most other uses make a fully rifled barrel a total waste of money.

    How does the stock smooth bore group on paper at 50 yards right now?
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  9. #9
    Member Jimboak47's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    23

    Default Shooting Slugs

    WAY to go Joat. Hammer down dude. You got it right.. Put in shell, aim at target pull trigger, gun go boooom.

  10. #10
    Member scott_rn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    power commuting twixt the valley and anchorage
    Posts
    803

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    Typically, you put a shell loaded with a slug into the breech of the gun, close the action, point at something you want a 3/4" hole in, and pull the trigger.
    Depends. You never stated what you're going to be shooting it at. Is this a plinker? Home defense gun? Bear defense gun? If any of these, you don't need anything more than the smooth bore the gun was born with.
    I probably shouldn't ask questions in a sleep deprived state in the middle of the night - things just don't make as much sense as they did in my head. I'm on my third night shift in a row right now and I'm pretty sure I'm a little delirious.

    About the "smooth bore" the gun was born with, I'm concerned my original remchoke (I think it is a modified) is constricted. Someone told me they are designed to shoot a tight pattern with steel shot and it would be to tight for a slug to pass through, thoughts?

    Rather than a deer-slug gun I am hoping to maintain a bird hunting/bear gun in a pinch setup.

    Thanks for the responses. The step-by-step instructions were good for a laugh at 3 a.m.

  11. #11

    Default

    First of all, you can shoot slugs through the Modified tube with no problems, but I think the general consensus is that an Improved Cylinder tube will give better accuracy. If you just want close range bear defense and birds use either of the above smooth choke tubes.
    Generally good advice in the prior post, but I will give you my take and summarize.
    (1) If you want good accuracy (beyond 40-50 yards), you need a better sighting system than a standard shotgun bead ( adjustable rifle sights or a scope ).
    (2) A fully rifled barrel gives best accuracy in general, especially with sabot slugs. A little less flexible since you can forget about bird or buck shot but the importance of that depends on your situation.
    (3) A rifled choke tube with a smooth barrel is the next best for accuracy and more flexible since changing tubes puts you back in the bird / buck shot business. I have a Winchester pump with rifle sights that will hold about 4 inches at 100 yards with a Browning rifled choke tube and Winchester Sabot Slugs (about 6-7 inches with Fosters). I have no experience with the Remington rifled choke that you bought, but the Browning choke is about 5 inches long and may be slightly more effective.??
    (4) Next in accuracy would be a smooth barrel and probably a smooth Imp Cylinder choke. Shotguns seem to be finicky about slugs so you will need try different brands and types. The Alaska Boys have some good recommendations in other threads about what type slugs you should use for bear defense and I would heed that advise in that situation.
     

  12. #12
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Wrangell
    Posts
    7,600

    Default

    Most shotgun barrels .729dia and the old full choke .040 with the new full usally .030. If you were to mic a slug you would see it will fit through a full choke. Some of the newer slugs are harder lead than used in the past but still their skirt expands to fill the bore. Cylinder will work for sure and Imp/cyl is better in many guns. Many choke tubes now days are marked Full Lead/Imp/Mod steel ect. Some barrels over the last twenty years have been bored .735 as standard and some extra full choke as much a .050.All that said you will be better off with a mod choke than the rifled one if shooting slugs and the rifled if shooting sabots.I would trade the rifled for a imp/cyl and not worry about it.JMHO

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Fredericksburg, Virginia, United States
    Posts
    127

    Default

    I use a Remington 11-87 with the cantilever scope mount and a rifled choke tube. I can lump 2 3/4" Buckhammers into a 3" circle at 100 yards with ease. I have a straight 4x Leupold on the gun, and it is pretty awesome with deer. I wouldn't discount the rifled choke tubes with regular lead slugs. They dont really do the sabots well, but full sized lead slugs will usually shoot pretty decent. Scotty

  14. #14
    Member c04hoosier's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    572

    Default

    I read somewhere else that the rifled choke tube shoots the Remington Buckhammers pretty well. I haven't tried them in mine yet. I have always shot the Winchester Foster style slugs because they are so much cheaper. I have used both the rifled tube or Imp Cyl and don't notice much difference at 100 yards. Both ways are "minute of deer."

  15. #15
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    124

    Default Rifled chokes

    Using a Remington 870, I got better accuracy with the rifled Remchoke than imp cyl with Lyman diabolo style slugs.

    How aggressive the rifled choke is makes a difference. The greatest of the rifled choke guns is the Paradox from Holland and Holland. The last 2 inches of the barrel have a rachet style rifled choke that is about 1:36 turn. Slugs are to be at or about 0.001-0.002 inches under barrel diameter with the slugs hitting the chokes at 1050 fps... and spinning up in those 2 inches.

    The Paradox can put 735 grain slugs into 3" at 100 yards.... day in and day out since the 1880's. The Westley Richards Super Explora ups the velocity to around 1200 fps.

    How well the slug moves down the barrel and engages the rifling is everything.

    I am playing with Paradox slugs in my 870.. but need to size the slugs to at or just below barrel diameter.. and the sizers are being made. This will be a good test of present day rifled screw in chokes against the gold standard of the H&H.

  16. #16
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Wrangell
    Posts
    7,600

    Default

    A nice 8 bore H&H in a herd of Tembo would be a kick in the pants.

  17. #17
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    124

    Default Tembo and 8 bore

    If you have $39,000... just hanging around.... Champlin Arms has an H&H 8 bore that is quite nice.

    After dropping $39K, the $12K tag for a bull ele is chump change.

    It is a very very nice rifle.

    Ah.. for the good old days.... times we could "believe in"...

  18. #18

    Default

    Back in the 70's there was a gunshop in Grinnell Iowa called Rose's gunshop. Since Iowa is a shotgun only state for deer Mr. Rose sold lots of slug guns. Mr Rose was a little squirrelly and a whole lot sensitve to recoil. So a certain fell named "yours truely" got to sight in dozens of slug guns every year in turn for unlimitted use of the polishing wheels and bluing tanks. Most if not all of the slug guns were smooth bore back in those days and I remember shooting some pretty impressive groups with some of them.

    My experience in more recent times is that (as was mentioned) the screw in choke tubes are a joke. Think about it, the slug is already running 1500fps when it gets to this little dab of rifling.. whats the rifling gonna do pat the slug on the ***** on the way by and say fly straight mr slug. I don't think so. My first hand experience was to remove that rifled tube and replace it with an improved cylinder tube and then shoot some Winchester Super X foster stlye slugs. The Super X's through the smooth ic tube outshined everything I tried through the rifled tube every time.

    I read through this thread pretty quickly but I don't think any body touched on this yet....fixed barrel shotguns as a rule will be inharently more accurate than shotguns with interchangable barrels. Remingtons and Mossbergs with quick change slug barrels usually won't hold a candle to the Ithaca Deerslayer with a threaded on barrel. But then how accurate do you need to be for actual hunting conditions? The Remingtons and Mossbergs will usually group 4-5 inches at a hundred yards and the Ithaca will go half that. NOTICE: I said as a rule. So if your Remmy or 500 shoots way good then don't take offense!

    My favorite all time slug gun is a Stevens model 67 pump. They are very durable(all steel), have a screw in barrel and can be bought for very little. I have set 3 of these up in 20 ga in recent years for local youth to use durying their special Ia. youth deer season. I look for clean ones at gun shows or on the net. I cut the barrels off at 22 inches, shorten the stock to fit the tike shooting it, install a cheap recoil pad and drill and tap the receiver for a weaver 1 piece base and slap on a low power shotgun scope. This setup always groups <3 inches and puts smiles on the faces of our next generation of hunters. Not figuring my time the last one of these I set up had $170 tied up. You can't buy a good slug barrel for that and its a lot of fun to do especially if the kid hangs around and you work on it together.

    One of these little deer guns went to a family with 4 boys. The last I knew that gun had killed about a dozen Iowa whitetails. I think this year the little 20 ga was turned over to the youngest of the 4 for his turn!

    The 67 also comes in 12 ga and thats what I would start with for bear. I would also install iron sights as opposed to the scope and add a sling.

  19. #19

    Default

    IMO: it IS worth buying a slug barrel. I have a Rem 870 Express 12ga 3" slug gun that came with a 18 1/2" smooth-bore barrel. Accuracy was very mediocre, half as a result of the rather short sight radius, and the other half as a result of the extremely nasty muzzle blast from the overly short barrel, making me dread shooting it. I ordered a 24" smooth-bore barrel, with iron sights, made by Mossberg (yes, Mossberg). I was surprised that the muzzle blast from my "Remberg" was now very tolerable, and accuracy went up accordingly. Moral of the story: forget about the so-called "handiness" of short barrels...stick with 24" or longer.(either rifled, or smooth, depending on your preferred ammo) You'll shoot better...and your ears will thank you.

    Marshall/Ak

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •