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Thread: Why I hunt

  1. #1
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    Default Why I hunt

    I have been reading a lot of the threads and see a lot of opinions on ethics, names, techniques Etc.

    For what is it worth, I feel a lot of people have lost sight of what it is we hunters do and why. This may be the wrong place for this but I would like to give my take on why I hunt.

    First and foremost, itís not easy. If it were everyone would do it, and do it successfully. A successful hunt requires hours of planning, looking at topos, talking to locals and scouting.

    Secondly, I think preparation is one of the best parts of the hunt. Ensuring that all of my gear is ready and packed. Maps have been checked and double checked. Safety and first aid equipment all in its place. Travel arrangements have been made and triple checked. Hours are spent with hunting partners going over every last detail. Sleep is lost the week prior to the hunt in anticipation. I feel like a kid waiting for Santa.

    Third, the hunt itself. Standing in the bush alone and ready. At no other time in my life are my senses as highly tuned. Every little gust of wind is felt. The smell of rotting leaves can be overwhelming. I hear every foot step of a squirrel as it hurriedly prepares for winter. My eye catches movements over great distance. I am defiantly switched on! At no other time of year is the outdoors as awesome or beautiful. Fireweed in deep red, the yellows of the fading cottonwoods and termination dust on the highest peaks. This is it, the very best time of the year. I have planned and prepared and all I am assured of is a few days away for my job. Time spent in the woods with no cell phones, no bills, and only one worry. Survival.

    In the event that I harvest an animal, it means that I have done it better than eighty percent of my fellow hunters. In the event that I do not fill my tag, I am still successful. As my wife puts it, I return a new man, refreshed and reborn. While I donít attend any church service, and donít consider myself a religious man, I find god on these hunts.

    While everyone want to debate ethics and new laws and policy, I think it takes away from the pure experience of hunting. Hunters must vote and follow laws that affect our rights, but in the end it all comes down to this. Just Hunt.

    My father passed this love on to me and in turn I have passed it to my son. I can only hope that he passes it on and that the tradition continues. To all my fellow hunters, good luck. I do not care what game you choose to hunt as long as it is hunted with respect. As hunters we are the ultimate conservationists.

  2. #2
    Member High Country's Avatar
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    Excellent post. I couldn't have written it better myself.

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the post - certainly is refreshing after reading a lot of the stuff that has been on here lately.

  4. #4
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Default My 1000 words

    Backstrap for my loved ones.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  5. #5
    Member Diesel Nut's Avatar
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    I knew I wasn't supposed to feel dejected just because I didn't connect with a moose (yet) this year. Thanks for reminding me why I'll always spend time in the woods during hunting season, even if I'm just taking my guns for a walk.

  6. #6
    Member pike_palace's Avatar
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    Just when I was about to give up moose hunting for this year, I read this. New motivation is a powerful tool!
    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

  7. #7
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    I hunt for a living.
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

  8. #8
    Member baitem907's Avatar
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    Superb Post Couldn't have said it any better myself.
    Jess
    Bait Em 907
    Bear Bait & Moose Lure Company
    www.baitem907.com
    http://www.facebook.com/pages/Bait-E...56572604387163

  9. #9
    Member ret25yo's Avatar
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    I hunt cause i like to. it makes me feel better about myself , I have low self esteem,,,

    If you cant stand behind the troops in Iraq.. Feel free to stand in front of them.

  10. #10
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    Default Modern Man...

    still has a basal need to hunt...whether or not you want to acknowledge it, one way or another, it's in our genetics to hunt...if you're a celephane hunter or a big game hunter, today's society cannot & will not be able to stifle the need to hunt.

    Many are trying to curb the enthusiasm or channel the energies to other ventures...(hunting for the right mountain to ski, or the right hole to open up so the running back can hit it, or the elusive hole in one), the sad fact is that many in today's society are confined to a cubicle, stuck to a computer screen, answering telephones, & trying to sell, for those that have channeled their energies towards the company that they work for.

    It's in today's jargon in many work places, etc. etc.

    The sad part is, is that today society, marketing is a big part of this basal need, & only a small percentage of people hunt (which is a mixed blessing). & any & all dollars will need to be recouped for marketing additional plots of land for lease, or the newest study for scent elmination, or the next bung out tool.

    Likewise, many a hunting opportunities within the L48 are going the way of land development for the growing work force of cubical hunters, hired out by big game guides of big business. These hunters are going to look north here, where many a millions of acres of land are open to the public, & not locked up by land leases. The smaller & smaller cadre of hunters looking for trophies will continue to crunch an already booked line of guides.

    Basal desires, drive our need to hunt. Many have been duped into believing that this isn't true, & many have been conditioned to accept that the need to hunt is long gone. It's not just the Anti's or the PETA freaks that have help recondition the human to steer away from the basal need, but many in big business, as well. Starting with suburbs of the 1950's & the decline of agriculture.

    It's no surprise that both the decline of US family farms, & the decline in hunting are hand in hand, and completely correlates to corporate growth & the economy & education.

    Many here, haven't been duped, & are fufilling ancient calls within, & are rewarded rightfully so, as many here are Alaksans & can head out on a weekend. The sad fact is that many a hunting opportunites for L48's are cost prohibative.

    Human's likewise are social animals, pack animals. Hence the "sharing" of hunting stories, that have roots in our ancient selves, some, still trying to out do one another, with the "my fish/antlers is/are bigger than your fish/antlers"...

  11. #11
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    For some its just a matter of saying I'm going to go get meat and you take your gun and go.

  12. #12
    Member skybust's Avatar
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    Great post thanks for reminding us all whats all about.

  13. #13
    Member akshootnscoot's Avatar
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    Default

    And when I hunt with my dad, I'm a kid again

  14. #14
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    Default Winter

    Well, as the termination dust lowers I have to admit my first year as an Alaskan resident was an education.

    I was invited to hunt bear with a coworker and now good friend. We hunted over bait (a first for me) and did a little glassing. Success on this hunt was measured not by the kill, I did not pull the trigger, but by the education I recieved. I learned about good bait sites and techniques. I learned that baiting is a lot of work and that it involves more than just throwing food in the woods and waiting. I also learned a bit about my hunting partner. He is a true conservationist. Not to be confused with one of the bunny hugging granola eaters that would have hunting banded. This man has a deep respect for the wilds and the game animals that inhabit it. He manages his harvest to take only mature game and limits his take to his needs. Once the season was over the baits were gone and the only evidence left was a cleared area left by the many animals that visited the site.

    I was invited to goose hunt in the Delta area. No goose but I did get to watch a heard of buffalo. Being from the lesser 48 I had never even seen a wild buffalo so to watch the sun rise and hear and see real buffalo at less than 50 yards, it was true magic for me.

    My planned Bou and moose hunts got canceled this year due to work issues. I did not put in for any draws as I am new to Alaska, did not have a real idea of where to hunt and did not want to take a tag from someone that could better put it to use than I. I was able to get out on one weekend for Moose. I was in a 50 inch 3 brow area. I did not have any assistance and could only rely on topos and arial photos for scouting. Using my very limited knowledge on moose I picked an area and off I went. The first Saturday I saw 4 bulls, all to small but it felt good that I found an area with bull moose on my own. I got sicker than all get out and did not get to hunt the second day.

    It was a weak season but it was a successful one. I learned that this is not Texas style hunting and you had better be is shape. I have already started working out for next season. I learned that in order to be successful you have to work harder than the other guy.

    In the end I did not fill my freezer but did refresh my spirit. THe short time I was able to spend in the woods will sustain me until next season. I have already started planning my bait sight and come spring I will be ready. I have Knowledge that will now allow me to put in for a few draw hunts. With a little luck work will not remove me form the field next fall and my first moose will appear in the cross hairs. I am excited already.

    I would like to thank everyone that posted on the site. I have read and learned much for you. I have shared in your success via your pictures and post. I wish each of you the best of luck and that all of your adventures end safely.

  15. #15
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    Great posts Border. I do love filling the freezer, taking a vacation, spending time with good buddies, seeing all kinds of wildlife, no phones (except sat phone), and having it be quiet, all at the same time.
    I also think being the first one up in the morning helps out also. Being in position during prime time is a must.

  16. #16
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    I hate it when people spiritualize hunting.

    I don’t believe I’ve ever had a “basal need” to hunt. I just like the outdoors, and God’s creation, and hunting, fishing, gathering, etc. is a way to be part of nature, as well as just observing it.

    Stranger, said he hunts for a living, and I can identify with that. Perhaps the beegest reason I hunt is that it justifies owning guns. Maybe, mankind has a “basal need”, to own weapons, because of a “basal need” to survive. I can buy into that.

    As I see it,
    Hunters are a minority, which might indicate that I’m correct, that people Do Not have a “basal need” to do it.

    “Hunting opportunities” are being lost all over the world, not just in the L48, but here too. Hunting here in the Greatland, can be “cost prohibitive” too, because, so much of the land that is available for hunting is inaccessible.

    And, it would, of course, depend on how you define “hunting opportunities”. Many places outside, people have the opportunity to hunt in the evenings after work, or on weekends. In other words, it’s easy. Here in the Greatland, hunting is more often an expedition with huge access considerations, and plenty of competition.

    I would agree that humans are “pack animals” so to speak, especially when I see all the empty trailers and rigs parked at the trailheads, along the roads.

    I’ve no beeg bone to pick, but I just feel like Hunting,,,,, DOESN’T make us anymore Special or Spiritual than farming, for example. Or, many other activities.

    You be the Judge.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  17. #17
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Default Spiritualized

    I too dislike the outdoor cathedral mentality. I'm most spiritual with my family, however and where ever we find ourselves together.

    I'll find my happiness by waking up. My spirituality....well thats my buisness and I hope your taking care of your buisness too.

    Hunting.....it's just something I do. A guy has to exercise and eat, right?

  18. #18

    Smile many reasons...

    I love being out in God's creation. But, I choose to worship the Creator and not the creation. I love the campfires, wall tents, good rifles and hanging meat. I like the rewarding feeling of a freezer full of "free range" moose and caribou. I love the look on my daughters faces when they shot their moose, caribou and bears. Spending 2 weeks in a hunting camp will give you a good look at your "friends". I enjoy the planning of a hunt and all it entails. Looking back at old hunting pictures is rewarding and fulfilling. Long live the hunt.

  19. #19
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default People hunt for different reasons

    I support most of them except for wasters and head hunters. Them, I have no patience with.

  20. #20
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    Default Well, Smitty...

    seems you directed your reply to my post, & I know you don't believe that we have a "basal need" to hunt, but we do, whether or not hunting is declining, we do still have this need. As I said, todays society is making it more & more difficult, if not taboo, to address these needs.

    & remember that hunting doesn't just include hunting four legged animals, but the military & the hunting of two legged's as well.

    You may not want to believe it, but there's a nearly complete history of man where warfare took place, from before the time of the Pharoh's of Egypt to todays war in Iraq & Afganistan.

    Hunting/warfare are nearly identical.

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