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Thread: End of Season Line Treatment

  1. #1

    Default End of Season Line Treatment

    So...I know there is a little fishing time left to sqeeze out of the season, but when the time comes to put away the rods and reels for the season, what do you all do with your fly line?

    Besides washing it down, do you do treat it with anything before storing it?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    End of season? Ha! You don't have to do that in SE. Fall steelhead is starting up, winter steelhead will kick in a few months later, then guess what? Spring steelhead will be starting.

    Sorry, no I have no idea on line treatment.

  3. #3
    Member bigcox's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kingfisherktn View Post
    End of season? Ha! You don't have to do that in SE. Fall steelhead is starting up, winter steelhead will kick in a few months later, then guess what? Spring steelhead will be starting.

    Sorry, no I have no idea on line treatment.


    Ooooh....Envious!
    You know your not catching any fish when you start talking about the weather...


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  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by kingfisherktn View Post
    End of season? Ha! You don't have to do that in SE. Fall steelhead is starting up, winter steelhead will kick in a few months later, then guess what? Spring steelhead will be starting.

    Sorry, no I have no idea on line treatment.

    Well I'm Juneau, so I guess I just have to get with the game! Never tried Steelhead, so I guess there's no better time to start!

    Thanks!

  5. #5
    Member Scottsum's Avatar
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    Default Fly line cleaner

    There are a number of fly line cleaners available and I'm sure they'd all work just fine. I use "Gink" (I think it's called) and I have one made by Rio. They're very simple to apply, some come with pads to apply them, but even a washcloth will work. I bought a cheap lamb's wool applicator a couple of years ago and it seems to work well. (also made by Rio) I also like to clean my lines a couple of times throughout the season as it restores the slick coating, helping it to slide through the guides faster and float higher. You'll definitely notice a difference in the longevity and the casting performance if you take care of a good quality fly line. I also like to take mine off the reels and put them back on a larger spool. I just save the spools they're sold-on for long term storage. This helps reduce line memory.

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    When the end of season actually hits I clean my lines then apply some line treatment (mucilin). Then I loosely coil it up and set it in the closet. The end of season down here is about january and lasts a few months, so it doesnt sit long.

  7. #7
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    As Scottsum mentioned treating line throughout the season, you can take it a step further and apply the product to your rod between the guides as well. You will really notice a difference in your casting.

  8. #8
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    I clean and treat my fly lines every time I use them. It is amazing how much dirt they pick up in just using them for one day. They fish much better if they are cleaned every time.

    I use the Reel-E-Good line winder and it makes cleaning and treating lines very quick and easy. I use Rio Agent X treatment for Rio lines, Scientific Anglers treatment for SA lines, and the little Cortland yellow pads for Cortland lines. For other lines I use Glide. The Umpqua line dressing box works great for applying the dressing. I also use the little patches of cloth made for cleaning firearms for cleaning my fly lines.

  9. #9

    Default

    Thanks everyone for the replys. I guess I've negleted my lines a bit. I always wash them when fishing in the salt, but not so much in fresh water. Need to get some line treatment as well.

  10. #10
    Member Scottsum's Avatar
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    Default Winding lines.

    I've looked at the reely good winders, but haven't taken the plunge yet. I just take the spools that the fly lines come-on and stick a bodkin through about 2/3 of the way across the spool. Stick a pen through the center hole and wind away using the bodkin as a handle. I usually can hold the reel with my feet pretty easily. If you don't have a winder, or a second person, this will work fine.

  11. #11
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    Hey KingFisher hows the fall steelheading down there?
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  12. #12

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    I'm not acquainted with the reely good, but I've been using a Struble Line Winder for close to 20 years. Sounds like the same idea. I really like the fact that the coiled lines fit perfectly into a quart size ziploc, which I label for storage.

    One fine tuning point: I clip off the backing about 5 feet behind the fly line and put in a bimini, then use that to make a double loop. Then I do the same to the backing. It creates a large doubled loop in each for 100% loop-to-loop connections. Makes for quick and easy line changes and fewer nail knots to retie. Also saves on extra spools on trips.

  13. #13
    Member jakec5253's Avatar
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    Default removing backing?

    When you guys remove your fly lines for winter storage, do you remove the backing too? Do you replace it every year, or just leave it on the spool? I am going to remove my fly lines for cleaning/storage over the winter, and was curious about the backing. thanks.


    Jake
    All the romance of trout fishing exists in the mind of the angler and is in no way shared by the fish.

  14. #14

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    I unspool the backing onto my Struble line winder overnight to make sure it's dry and inspect for wear, then spool it back onto the reel. On reels that are used a lot and get a lot of UV I change out the backing every 3 years, and every 5 years on reels that are seldom used. That's 30 pound backing, BTW. I change 20 pound backing every 2 and 4 years. Without the line winder I'd at least put the reel in a well ventilated spot for a couple of weeks to dry it if I couldn't unwind the backing for drying.

    Backing may be dacron or something newer, but it still goes bad with neglect. Kind of funny to watch a guy chasing his flyline across the water. You can guess that his nail knot was bad, he hadn't taken care of his backing, or most likely, was using one of those add-on loops on the back of his fly line. Over the years I've picked up 4 free fly lines. Two still had fish on them, but no one onhand would claim the line. Embarrassed I guess, and easy to understand why.

  15. #15
    Member stevelyn's Avatar
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    I've always been told that Armor All was a good line treatment after cleaning.
    Now what ?

  16. #16
    Member Scottsum's Avatar
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    Default I've heard that.

    I've heard that too, but cleaners designed specifically for fly lines are cheap, so you won't save much money using armor all. When we're talking about a $60-100.00 fly line, I'll spend the 4 bucks on the cleaner the manufacturers put-out.

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