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Thread: Best Kenai King Powerboat Charter?

  1. #1

    Default Best Kenai King Powerboat Charter?

    I am looking for anyones opinion on the best powerboat charter for late july second run Kings. Looking for the best opportunity to catch large kings. I want someone who is going to let me still fish and not try to do everything.

  2. #2
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    What do you mean by "still fish"? What type of method do you prefer to use, backtoll, drift, or backbounce? There are guys the do specific techniques all the time and there are guys that do various methods at any give time depending on the conditions.

  3. #3

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    Or do you mean that you want to do the fishing... not the guide. In other words, are you looking for the guide that won't take the rod from you if things are getting out of hand, and the guide who won't "power set" the hook, etc. There are definitely guides that in all practicality do the fishing and others that leave it all up to the guest.

    I believe, however that most guides will allow you to land or lose the fish based on your skill, particularly if you communicate your intentions. I will give assistance when requested or deemed necessary for safety, and preservation of the equipment. Nevertheless, I don't know of any guides that will allow a guest to net the fish (maybe on an extremely rare occasion?)

  4. #4

    Default Kenai Guides

    I guess I should have been more clear. I don't want a guide to power set the hook, try to take the rod away in any manner. I would like a guide to set things up and put me on the fish. Hooking and fighting the fish should be on the paying angler. Looking for good experiences and especially ones to avoid if they have a tendency to not let the angler fish. Thanks

  5. #5
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Question

    Question:

    If the guide lands the fish, then who's fish is it?

    If the guide lands a fish he has to fill out his king stamp just like everyone else. If the guide has already filled out his king stamp, should he even be handling the rod then?

    Seems like a gray area in the law.
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    Most guides that I know let the angler do everything except net the fish. When it comes to fighting it they will tell you what to do when needed and let you fight the fish, set the hook, and the guide will net the fish. This particular angler may not want a guide that does a lot of backtrolling, he may prefer a dragger or back bouncer. A lot of guides have gone to not powersetting, or even setting the hook after pulling the rod from the holder. With the new superlines setting the hook after the rod is pegged down in the holder and drag ripping is often unneccary.

    As far as the law goes, in Alaska it is pretty easy, who ever sets the hook, that is who's fish it is, period. Under the law "power setting" is not defined as setting the hook, so basically if the boat is used to assist the angler it is who ever pulls the rod from the holder, ie: the anlger in that seat.
    Most guides will only touch the rod if the rod is about to break or the angler is close to losing the fish such as a quick run by the motor or across the boat then the guide gets the rod back to the angler as quickly as possible.

  7. #7
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    Default Fish hooking

    In answer to the question about who owns the fish. The person that hooks the fish is the responsible party and needs to put it on their ticket. Handing the rod off is illegal if the party receiving the rod tags the fish as theirs.

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    Nerka is right on, who ever hooks the fish, you see it a lot, dad hooks the fish hands it off to the kid and the kid fights the fish and then dad puts it on the kids harvest card, totally illegal. It must go on the tag of whoever set the hook, no matter what!
    It happens a lot out halibut fishing, boat limits, they are illegal although it happens a lot. I went of homer a few years ago and was lucky enough to get the deck hands limits, the did a great job of making sure they set the hook before allowing me to reel the fish in.

    I was actually on a shark charter 7 years ago or so where the captain was a target of an undercover investigation and was ticketed for setting the hook and handing off the rod. I happen to agree with the captain of that boat in the situation and it is a long story but to make it short he paid the fine instead of fighting it.

  9. #9
    Member fishNphysician's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SalmonMan View Post
    I don't want a guide to power set the hook, try to take the rod away in any manner.
    Sounds like you want to avoid backtrolling plugs or diver/bait. Generally, guides will be pretty persnickety about fishing the rod out of a fixed rodholder and instructing the client not to touch the rod until the rod has folded and line is stripping from the reel. That is definitely the most effective technique when fishing this method.

    Holding your own rod while backtrolling is difficult for most clients because the current pulls hard against the gear while it is fishing, to the point of fatiguing your arm in fairly short order. A tired arm allows the rodtip to drift out of optimal fishing position, which will cost the angler strikes/hookups and increase the risk of tangles with the other rods. Downtime dealing with fouled gear will ultimately cost the entire boat strikes/hookups. More importantly, most clients do not have the discipline to hold still and just WAIT WAIT WAIT for the rod to completely load up when they get a strike. Premature e-jerk-ulation is THE major downfall of the novice holding his/her own rod. That's why experienced backtrollers avoid having the angler hold the rod.

    If you desire a hands on experience in hooking your own fish, find a guide who likes to either boondog/free-drift/drag bait or backbounce bait or better yet, both. If you are adept at casting a conventional reel, the boondoggin' guide may even let you cast your own gear. If you opt for backbouncing, then it's all on you to deploy your gear, work the bait, feel the strike, and set the hook. It's really the best hands-on option for the experienced angler, but can be easily mastered by a beginner (if they pay close attention to their guide!).
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  10. #10

    Thumbs up Guide Service

    I would recommend Keith Holtan of Beaver Creek Guide sevice. He is a super nice guy, and will give you the option to pull plugs, boondoggle or back bounce bait. Keith is friendly, and will provide more assistance to the novice angler.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by SalmonMan View Post
    I guess I should have been more clear. I don't want a guide to power set the hook, try to take the rod away in any manner. I would like a guide to set things up and put me on the fish. Hooking and fighting the fish should be on the paying angler. Looking for good experiences and especially ones to avoid if they have a tendency to not let the angler fish. Thanks
    I totally agree. I can't stand it when guides grab rods (a close second thing I can't tolerate is guides fishing at all while on a charter). As far as lost "equipment" (lure, weights), that's part of fishing too. They can say something about how to fish, but grabbing rods is not cool.

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    It is illegal for a Kenai River Guide to fish from the boat with paying clients.

  13. #13

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    Yukon you are correct. Our guide on the Kenai told us he was not allowed to set the hook for a client.

  14. #14
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