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Thread: Griz Meat?

  1. #1
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    Default Griz Meat?

    OK here is the quetion. Is Griz meat worth the effort? I am new to Alaska hunting and have never taken a bear. I saw 2 griz on a hillside last weekend but just watched them through a spotting scope. I have purchased a tag and if given the chance, will take one this weekend.

    I just want to know if I should salvage the meat or not. I have eaten every kind of wild game from squirle to black bear to moose and enjoy it over anything that comes wrapped in plastic from the store.

    Please let me know your thoughts. Thanks.

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    Only had meat off of one & it was a spring bear, but it was as good as black bear.
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    When you open him up, you will know. If he smells like fish or some other stench, the meat is probably inedible. If he has a mild to no odor, then chow down. Berry fed Griz is reported to be prime eating.

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    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default Some yes, some no

    Sometimes grizzly meat is edible, and sometimes it isn't. It depends on what the bear has been eating. As was said, if it's a bear that's been feeding on salmon or carrion of some kind, you can probably forget it. If he's spent all his time in the berry patches, it might be worth a try.

    If there's no obvious issue with it in the field, haul it home and give it a try. If you discover that it is not edible, you can always donate it to the zoo, if you are in the Anchorage area.

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    Quote Originally Posted by borderblue1 View Post
    OK here is the quetion. Is Griz meat worth the effort?
    I just want to know if I should salvage the meat or not. I have eaten every kind of wild game from squirle to black bear to moose and enjoy it over anything that comes wrapped in plastic from the store.

    Please let me know your thoughts. Thanks.
    I took a gizzly last week that had been chowing down on blueberries. We took the backstraps to try it and it was delicious. Even my 16 year old daughter liked it. If the bear is up on the hillside grazing on the berries, he's probably good to go. Let me know, I'll take some of the meat off it!

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    Default Thanks.

    Thanks to each of you. I was brought up to eat what I kill. Having been in Alaska for a little over a year, I am beginning understand "predator control" and its effect on the moose, caribou and sheep populations. I would love to have a Griz rug and even my once bunny hugging flower sniffing wife has stated a bear would look nice in our entry way. That being said, old lessons are not easily forgotten. I still can here my dad saying " if you kill it, you eat it".

    As I have stated, I have baught a tag. I guess I will have to make the decision when the time comes.

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    Member BIGAKSTUFF's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by borderblue1 View Post
    Thanks to each of you. I was brought up to eat what I kill. Having been in Alaska for a little over a year, I am beginning understand "predator control" and its effect on the moose, caribou and sheep populations. I would love to have a Griz rug and even my once bunny hugging flower sniffing wife has stated a bear would look nice in our entry way. That being said, old lessons are not easily forgotten. I still can here my dad saying " if you kill it, you eat it".

    As I have stated, I have baught a tag. I guess I will have to make the decision when the time comes.
    "If you kill it, you eat it" is a great motto to live by. But i love to eat moose and caribou, and it will be harder to do that if the bear pop keeps exploding like it is, if you have the opportunity to kill a bear then do it. Try the meat, if you don't like it, then no big deal. BUT, that doesn't mean you shouldn't take a bear whenever possible just because you don't like the meat.

    A carcass left in the field doen't have to go to waste, revisit it in a few days with a friend who has a bear tag...........
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  8. #8

    Default two griz?

    One of you, saw two griz huh... I got a rifle, i live in the valley, that makes a one to one ratio....



    I have tried griz a couple of times. One time delicious, the other time like eating a rotten shoe. Black bear is pretty dang good, but definitely seasonal. Griz is more iffy.

    I am a big proponent of "you kill it, you eat it," but there gets a point where you have to leave it as "you kill it, you try and eat it if you can stand it."

  9. #9

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    Oh yeah, and ps:

    Once you cut the bear open, you should have a good idea if you want to eat it or not. Bad bears usually smell something aweful.

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    Quote Originally Posted by borderblue1 View Post
    Thanks to each of you. I was brought up to eat what I kill. Having been in Alaska for a little over a year, I am beginning understand "predator control" and its effect on the moose, caribou and sheep populations. I would love to have a Griz rug and even my once bunny hugging flower sniffing wife has stated a bear would look nice in our entry way. That being said, old lessons are not easily forgotten. I still can here my dad saying " if you kill it, you eat it".

    As I have stated, I have baught a tag. I guess I will have to make the decision when the time comes.
    I know exactly what you mean, I was raised the same way and until recently I had no desire to kill a griz cuz I couldn't eat it. Well, my buddy pointed out that they "eat lot's of moose" so I changed my mind. I shot my first bear last week. A mountain griz. I had always heard that they were no good to eat. That's why we're not required to salvage the meat. It was really weird killing an animal and not bringing home the meat. Well, come to find out, like others have said, they can be good. Mine smelt fine. I really wish I'd have brought home the meat. Worst case is I would have thrown it out after the fact. Live and learn I guess. Go shoot one and give us a report!

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    Member blasterak's Avatar
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    I'm hoping I can find out how a grizz taste, going after grizz this weekend. I originally didn't plan on keeping the meat but after reading this I think i'll have to bring it back and give it a try. Depending on how it smells though, if it smells of something fierce, i'll leave it for nature to enjoy.

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    I've been fortunate enough to be given 3 different spring grizzlies. I say fortunate because they were all excellent. Its ironic that many folk are now killing bear so they can have a moose to shoot in the future, so they can have the meat from the moose to eat. Yet they refuse to try the bear's meat. If its meat you're after, a good griz is the equivalent of a young bull moose and some would argue its better tasting. Try it- sure won't kill ya to try! The bonus is, even if the meat isn't salvable, you've still taken a great trophy to hang in your room, and the odds are better that there will be more moose in the area in future years for you.

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    Member BrettAKSCI's Avatar
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    So....what's the chances of a large spring Alaska peninsula boar being good to eat? I'm guessing it's remote, but????

    Brett

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    Member willphish4food's Avatar
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    probly remote I'd still dig into a backstrap just to be sure, though.

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    Grizz makes very good sausage,and smokies. smoked griz hams are good as well.If you harvest a bear close to any road take the meat even if you don't want it,donate it or what ever.People tend to go on an anti-hunter tear when they see a skinned bear carcass along a road

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    Default Fishy bear

    I cut some steaks off of the tenderloins of a fishy one last year to see if its as bad as everyone says. It was an old boar and this bear had nothing but fish bones in its gut. I fried them up in olive oil with just some salt and pepper on them. They were definately edible and I and my buddy finished them. They tasted like venison with a liver flavor. could live off of it. We ended up keeping the hind quarters for sausage.

  17. #17
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    I spent some time with a couple residents of Wiseman last week. They all said that berry fed arctic grizzly was good. Most of those bears never even eat a fish. I can't see whey they wouldn't be good to eat.
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    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    As stated you'll know an eater as soon as your close enough to smell him, I frankly don't thing you even need to skin them to know. My friend John harvested a young brown last year that was very edible. I couldn't smell that bear at all even fully dressed out. On the other hand I've been able to smell fish eaters a full 20 yards away! Of course time of year is a factor as well, same as a bou in rut, not exactly the best table critter
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