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Thread: Guns in school

  1. #1
    Member EricL's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Guns in school

    You know I read this article with interest. I took my hunter safety coarse in the 6th grade where it was taught by my english teacher. The final day each student was allowed to bring a weapon to school to "teach" the other students about it. Didn't think this was ever allowed any more. I am more than tickled to see this teacher doing this down in Juneau.

    http://www.adn.com/news/education/st...-8340353c.html

    Eric

  2. #2
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Firearms

    Firearms are allowed in schools for educational purposes with prior approval of the school administrator. That allows for rifle teams and firearm training to take place.

    When I was in Elim, I would bring my 12 gauge to school so the science teacher could take the class out to do nature studies. There were just too many brown bears around to risk otherwise. Those actions were never questioned. In Nulato I brought firearms into school for a Survival Course to give instruction to the kids. In Shaktoolik the elders often brought firearms into the shop for me to work on and repair. Never a problem. You just have to cover your bases and have approval.
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  3. #3
    Member Milo's Avatar
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    Talking and Gun Shows!

    Quote Originally Posted by Daveinthebush View Post
    Firearms are allowed in schools for educational purposes with prior approval of the school administrator. That allows for rifle teams and firearm training to take place.
    Well that and for a good gun show like at the Wasilla High School. Lets see that happen in California.

  4. #4
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    Default

    Back in highschool we used to go dove hunting or deer hunting (depending on the season) in the mornings before school and then go straight to school. We always left our firearms in the trucks and never had a problem with it. Hell the principal did the same thing. That was just a couple of years ago too.
    If life is a waste of time and time is a waste of life, lets get wasted and have the time of our lives. TK

  5. #5
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    Default

    I didn't even learn gun safety in boy scouts! every student in america should recieve gun safety education.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  6. #6
    Member aktomboy's Avatar
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    Default

    Yes it is a good thing to see other areas are teaching about gun safety in the schools. I was in 7th grade at Ft. Greely when we had our first one offered. Then all 4 years in high school I shot on the rifle team. Not to mention our rifles and other gear along with the range at the time was at the school. I also with the rest of us hunters and farm kids would also have a firearm in our trucks. Great to see Juneau wants to help instead of hinder a safe way to learn.

  7. #7
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Default

    I wish there was some way to get this into the Anchorage schools. I teach basic wilderness skills and survival as part of my 9th grade science classes, but there is no way that I could bring guns into the school to add that dimension to the lesson. Too bad...we've already buried a few kids this year at our school from gun recklessness and violence. Perhaps some basic gun safety skills could prevent at least one needless death.

    -Brian

  8. #8

    Default

    In Arizona where I went to high school about 5 years ago a school security guard found some spent shotgun shells and live 22 rounds floating around in the back of my truck left over from quail hunting the weekend before. This was a year or two after the whole Columbine thing went down. Cops were called swat was called and the school shut down. The only reason we didn't get expelled or even arrested is because one of the security guards saw us out hunting near his house in the boonies. He just happened to be an ex cop so it all played well in me and my buddys' favor in the end. Nothing came of it but from then on I was sure to clean out my truck before coming to school. Just thought I would share my story.

  9. #9
    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    just freakin awesome is all I can say about that. Ive never even thought it possible. NRA otta get ahold of this and give that school a grant or something or at least publicize it to maybe get more schools to follow suit.
    I have a similiar story as you trents daddy. It happened up here though. Luckily the cop that handled it had common sense and believed my story.

  10. #10

    Default

    That is awesome. Programs like that can go a long way to protect our 2nd Amendment rights.

  11. #11

    Default Marksmanship

    Regarding Boy Scouts of America... It's been 20 years now, but I remember getting a Marksmanship "merit badge" in Boy Scouts. Don't know if they still have that, but something available then. Troops are all different and how involved our youth are depends really on the leadership of the Scout Master. Talking about this stirs some inspiration to contact the local troops... Maybe some of us can volunteer some time on this issue?

  12. #12
    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Boy scouts

    yes we still shoot and get our marksmanship merit badges.
    all my boys in troop 562 have passed that one off at camp this summer.
    they also have the Archery and they got that also.
    My troop is very active in making sure firearms and Archery are in the mix.
    I think most of Alaska troops are of the same thought, as at camp this summer both the Archery and rifle the Shooting ranges were the busiest places in the whole camp.
    Boys love to shoot....
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  13. #13
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    Default Brownies

    Not the bears, the young girl scouts.

    My 10 year old daughter's troop has had a pumpkin shoot the last couple years just before Haloween. The catch is it isn't an officially sanctioned event as GSA doesn't want to be resposible if anything goes wrong.

    It's well organized with a rangemaster and a couple of Hunter Safety teachers present. They start it off explaining gun safety and laying down the law on the rules for the shoot. A parent is required with each girl to assist her and remind her of the rules. They have three divisions and the girls and their parents can decide which one each girl is in. BB gun/ air rifle, .22 with open sights, .22 with scope. It really goes over well and the girls are excited when this event comes up.

  14. #14

    Default The principal

    gets my vote for "Educator of the Year". Is there a state level for this? I know it won't make national, but would be a nice symbology.
    Mike
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  15. #15

    Unhappy

    The NRA has been trying for YEARS to get these types of programs into our schools. However, liberal judges and the ACLU blocks as much of this as they can. The NRA has a program for kids called the Eddie Eagle program that I feel every kid should be exposed to.
    Maybe I'm dating myself, but when I was in high school back in Arkansas, we would bring our guns to school and store them in the study hall coat lockers if we were going to spend the weekend with a friend and go hunting. We would never worry about them, as everyone knew they were there and hunting and shooting was just a part of life then. Plus, we knew if we messed with someone elses stuff they, the teachers and our parents would whip our butts. Our teachers even brought their new guns in to show us. Guess what? There was never a shooting, accident or screaming kid running for their lives and we never remotely considered such a thing. The moral and discipiline breakdown in this country is evident now.........
    Now just why in the hell do I have to press "1" for English???

  16. #16
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    Default

    It's definitely a different world now, but one of my science class projects was to make a "Rube Goldberg" device of some sort to bring to class. With permission of my instructor and the principle, I brought a (unloaded of course) Krag-Jorgenson Rifle from the Spanish-American war to school and fashioned a machine to chamber a round in the rifle... while it had no practical use, it was fun. At any given time, someone in my shop class was refinishing a rifle or shotgun. It wasn't that uncommon to have long guns at school. So many schools have changed, it's good to see someone offering an educational aspect to guns.

  17. #17
    Member BucknRut's Avatar
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    Default for what it's worth...

    Not for sure, but I may be one of the youngest bucks frequenting this forum.
    Growing up in Northern Michigan where hunting is as much a religion (or a means of putting food on the table) as anywhere, times have rapidly changed in the past ten years. All of Northern Michigan shut down (even the church schedules changed) on November 15th (opening day of whitetail firearm deer season) and you can bet that my teachers saw little of me for the entire first week of that season. When I did return to school, I carried all of my gear in my pickup so that it was waiting for me when I snuck out early to hit the woods. Clothes in the passenger seat, gun in the middle, as if it were my girlfriend, and ammo on the dash. I knew that it wasnít supposed to be on school grounds, but whatís a young buck to do? I had to hunt! Looking back on the situation, it is good that I was blessed with good parents who had a good reputation. Other kids got in trouble for doing the same as I. I was told once that I should do a better job of concealing my weapons and ammo or else the other kids are going to complain of unfair treatment. I took the advice and never had another problem.
    Now, Michigan law does not even allow you to carry a concealed pistol into school or to a school event (football games and such). Even if you have a concealed carry permit, you must leave your firearm locked in your vehicle in the parking lot.
    My parents told me that they would not want to be kid when I was a kid, now I can say the same for the kids of today.
    Letís hope this school and its program is publicized and gains the valuable recognition it deserves!
    BNR

  18. #18

    Smile Gun restoration as a school project

    Our High School required every senior to complete a project that took 12 hours of hand on work and an accompanying report on the subject. Along with showing the project the students were required to explain what was done (public speaking part of the project). My English teacher told us to choose a topic that you were interested in. Naturally I chose a shooting project. I restored a K98 Mauser ( metal and wood restoration) and did a little action tuning (my project ended up taking 30 combined hours). My report was on the development of the Mauser series of rifles. With permission from the principal I was able to being the rifle into school. The only stipulation was that the bolt had to be disassembled. I had teachers come from other classes to sit in on my demonstration. In fact I was asked to repeat my demonstration for the other English class. As a side note I got an A+ on the project and I received several complements on my work.
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  19. #19
    Member WinMag_300's Avatar
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    Default

    I like to see gun safety and awareness taught to youth. Unfortunately in most parts of America, youngsters are taught gun fear. Good thread.

  20. #20
    Member WinMag_300's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BucknRut View Post
    ...Michigan law does not even allow you to carry a concealed pistol into school or to a school event (football games and such). Even if you have a concealed carry permit, you must leave your firearm locked in your vehicle in the parking lot...
    The Michigan statute allows carry on school grounds while picking up or dropping off children, but not for general purposes. I agree the law is somwhat restrictive. I think it is like everything else in Michigan. Things are watered down to the lowest common denominator to accomodate all of the stupid people.

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