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Thread: Centerpin question (flame alert!)

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    Default Centerpin question (flame alert!)

    This could possibly be a really dumb question. I floated the Kenai with a buddy and he had a cenerpin rod/reel combo. Here is my question....is it necessary to have a spey rod for centerpin fishing? Or could you use a regular 9' 8wt rod? Don't rip on me too bad!

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    Member G_Smolt's Avatar
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    You are confusing your techniques.

    Spey and 2-hand flyrods are somewhat similar in appearance to centerpin rods, but upon closer inspection they are entirely different animals.

    So to answer your questions...no to both.

    Centerpin rods are traditionally of the full-flex, slow action sort, 11.5'-14' long, and made for a specific weight reel so as to balance correctly.

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    It would depend on your intended use. A friend and I have considered centerpin gear for running jigs. Casting distance isn't a big deal but the long rod to keep the line off the water and the easy line feed would be nice. In that case the rod action wouldn't make much difference and a spey rod I already had could serve well. If you want to cast a mile than the long noodle rods are supposed to be the real deal.

    And having had a taste of king fishing with a spey rod? Its big-time fun. I can see a spey setup in my future. And then comes the learning curve with the different lines.

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    Member Wyatt's Avatar
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    Next thing you know, you'll be calling centerpinning fly fishing!

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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    I'd say a 9 foot baitcasting setup would work just fine for "centerpinning" and you'd have the bonus of being able to fight the fish with a drag. I guess a 13 foot baitcasting setup would work a bit better, just for added keeping line off the water.

    In any case its not fly fishing.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  6. #6

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    Float/center pin rods are built longer and more noodly to help protect the tippet and giving you the ability to run a lighter more stealthy tippet size. The added length will, as stated already, will help high sticking keeping the line off the water. The shorter rods mentioned will not allow for either of these circumstances.

    You should also run a floating type monofilament line as well, like Suffix Siege, Siglon FF, Raven or something along those lines. The floating line will aid in keeping a better drag free drift and easy pick up off the water for adjuments. Regular mono will sink, causing the float to be drug around, taking away your presentation.

    THe pin reel will give you that long, no pause drifts that you are looking for regarless of the rod, as long as you use the correct line.

    Spey blanks, in my poinion, will give you the length you need, but I don't think that have the same actions as pin/float rods do, there for giving you a little different result with protecting your tippet. I know there are people that are building them out of spey blanks and would differ in opinion, but that is just my feeling.
    "The Tug is the Drug"

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    Member TYNMON's Avatar
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    Default What????

    Quote Originally Posted by ak_powder_monkey View Post
    I'd say a 9 foot baitcasting setup would work just fine for "centerpinning" and you'd have the bonus of being able to fight the fish with a drag. I guess a 13 foot baitcasting setup would work a bit better, just for added keeping line off the water.

    In any case its not fly fishing.
    Centerpin rods are very slow action rods unlike casting that are fast... Plus the fact that centerpins advantage is in the extra length of rod to create drag free drift.

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    Member Phish Finder's Avatar
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    Drifter will be back in a few weeks. He's got quite a bit of experience and he's a good fisherman with his setup. The drifts you can get are pretty inspiring.
    ><((((>.`..`.. ><((((>`..`.><((((>

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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TYNMON View Post
    Centerpin rods are very slow action rods unlike casting that are fast... Plus the fact that centerpins advantage is in the extra length of rod to create drag free drift.
    how bout the reel though? Why does one need one of those stupid dragless reels? I mean if you are whacking and stacking fine, but playing a trout or steelhead on a dragless reel from like 300 feet away seems mightly bad on the fish to me... Or do they have some kind of friction brake you can engage?
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    Member Scottsum's Avatar
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    Default I still don't get it.

    I'm still confused as to the benefit of a centerpin rig. So you can achieve a perfect drag for 300 ft downstream. With barbless hooks, (as I think we should all be using on the Kenai) what happens when a rainbow goes ballistic in heavy current with that much line in the water? In my experience, the hook comes free.

    To each their own, of course. I fished with an old Martin reel with virtually no drag for years and learned to palm pretty well with it. I still keep my drag set very loose initially and tighten it down as the fish tires.

    I guess I just love casting fly rods. Perfect loops are a thing of beauty and when that double haul strips the line off the reel...mm-mm. Few things are finer than a perfectly placed cast.

  11. #11

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    I only fish my pin from the boat, you can get a constant drift on the float without having to mend or recast and it nice to get it away from the motor in idle, it's also a simplier method to fish when you are on the tiller handle all day as well. Sure you can get a 300 yard drift, but I wouldn't recommend it, its bad for the fish and chances of actually getting a good solid hook set is marginal when the float is ahead of the hook, unless you are trotting it and set up perfect on the shotting pattern. Dragless reel makes these long drifts possible, but the enjoyment of fighting a big fish with nothing to rely on but your palm and good fighting technique makes it a fun setup.

    To each there own on this though, some will love it and some will dispise it, but the bottom line, it's your decision to use or not to use.
    "The Tug is the Drug"

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    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Having used a pin for 4 days this week on the Upper Kenai, I am hardly an expert. But I can tell you one thing. It is very effective. I caught by far more fish on my pinning set up than my 7 wt. One could also argue that my mending skills suck. Either way, it worked. The pinning reels and float rods are very specific to this style of fishing and anyone telling you otherwise doesn't have a clue what they are talking about. You should give your buddies pin a try. You may be surprised. I was when my 30-40' drifts with my 7 wt turned into 60+ yard drifts on the pin. Does it take the place of a fly rod? No. Is it an extremely effective fishing tool? Absolutely.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    the drag on pins is all set by your hand holding the rod and reel. generally, your drift wont be 300 feet. more like 100 on the long end. thats for me at least. i can horse a fish in faster with my pin than most people can with a spinning set-up. i can make instant drag changes, just by changing the pressure on the pin. once you fish with one, you never want to go back to anything else. watching that float go down is so addicting.

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    Member Scottsum's Avatar
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    Default Horsing a fish in fast?

    Hmmm. Not to be negative, but "horsing a fish in fast" sounds a little too much like competitive bass fishin' to me. Thanks for the info guys, but I think I'll stick with my fly rods. I'm usually pretty successful with them and even when the fishing is slow, I can always practice different casting techniques.

    Tight lines to all though.

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    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Yeah Scott the "horsing" part rubbed me wrong too. Pinning is more than that. Next time we. Fish together. ( soon I hope) I will let you use my outfit. It is pretty cool man. Just another tool man and a dang effective one at that.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    Member alaskachuck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ak_powder_monkey View Post
    I'd say a 9 foot baitcasting setup would work just fine for "centerpinning" and you'd have the bonus of being able to fight the fish with a drag. I guess a 13 foot baitcasting setup would work a bit better, just for added keeping line off the water.

    In any case its not fly fishing.
    Neither is bead fishing on the Kenai. It is bead fishing with a fly rod but we all do it.

    I watched the centerpinning again this year. It is pretty slick to watch. do I want to do it. No but for someone like my wife, who is very short and struggles with the cast in the wind and fast drifts it would work very very well for her. I just cannot let her slip to the dark side yet
    Grandkids, Making big tough guys hearts melt at first sight

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    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    The centerpins are pretty slick. Looking forward to using mine on a steelhead river in SE first of May. Then on the Kenai of course. Will be there in July and Sept I am proud to say. Chuck and Scott, you guys should give this thing a try when I see you next.


    Here is big sexy hooking up...









    And my first Kenai fish ever... A bad omen perhaps. Yep, I thought so. Ha ha... I will have to pay Gsmolt for some private lessons

    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  18. #18

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    I'd say a 9 foot baitcasting setup would work just fine for "centerpinning" and you'd have the bonus of being able to fight the fish with a drag. I guess a 13 foot baitcasting setup would work a bit better, just for added keeping line off the water.

    In any case its not fly fishing.
    Part of the allure for me is not having a drag. It's not any harder on the fish once you get the hang of it as i can put the breaks on pretty hard with my hand and it just takes way more skill and feel to land fish imo. You feel the fight much more but have to put enough pressure on the reel to stop a fish but not so much to break it off or pull the hook out

    And no it isn't fly fishing but neither is fishing a bead with a bobber oh wait i mean indicator
    To me a fly is not a round piece of plastic and while i have no problem with using bobbers (you have to with a centerpin) to me once you put one on your leader you aint fly fishing!

    I just wish everyone would respect everyone. The same guys who "fly fish" with beads and indicators and look down on centerpin need to remember how many trout fisherman in the lower 48 are laughing and are in horror about guys up here calling bead part of fly fishing

    Fly fishing is still my favorite but centerpinning is fun for me and imo is more suited for beads and doesnt basterdize what a fly rod was meant for.

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    Member Raptor_1's Avatar
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    Holy crap, can we all just go catch some fish and stop bickering! This is rediculous! Has it been that long of a winter??
    Alaska: We're all here cuz we're not all "there"

  20. #20
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kodiak Commando View Post

    Fly fishing is still my favorite but centerpinning is fun for me and imo is more suited for beads.

    Yep, I couldn't agree more.


    You just can't tell some dude that never tasted steak how good it is.


    Oh, Kodiak Commando, would you please pass the A1
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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