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Thread: New 8wt Rod

  1. #1
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    Default New 8wt Rod

    I'm in the market for new 8wt flyrod and looking for some advice from people that have used the rods I'm considering. I'm considering either a Winston Boron IIX or a Sage Z-axis. I've never fished a Winston, but own 3 other Sage rods. Anybody got an opinion on the two choices or another brand I've not considered? Thanks for your help.

  2. #2
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    Default Sage Z-axis

    I built a Sage z-axis rod and I love it. Its a 9' 8wt 2pc. Its super easy to cast and I have a blast with it. I really only have one rod and thats it. I use it for all sorts of fishing, lakes, streams, Kenai. It works for all of them for me. Good Luck.

  3. #3
    Member jakec5253's Avatar
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    Default Sage

    Another vote for the Z-Axis. I have a 10ft 7wt, and love it. I have also fished a few of the 10ft 8wts, and I would highly recommend it. I have not cast the BIIX in an 8wt, but I have cast the 9'6" 7wt, and it was a great rod too, the Sage just fit my casting style much better. My advice would be to visit a shop and take both of them for a test drive, see which fits your casting the best.
    All the romance of trout fishing exists in the mind of the angler and is in no way shared by the fish.

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    Member bigcox's Avatar
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    Default

    I also have a Sage Z-Axis, a 9'6" 7 weight. A great rod, definitely worth the money. I had mine custom built with a different reel seat and guides, got a great deal on it, cannot complain. I've heard of a new line of Rods that Sage is coming out with called the 99 series. I guess they have 4 through 8 weights and all of them are 9'9" in length. They are made for tossing idicator rigs. Sounds like a pretty sweet rod.

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    Default

    Echo. And that's from a life-long Sage fan. This summer I learned that really good performing rods don't have to have $600+ price tags. I fished Echos along side my XP and wife's VT2 and was really impressed. The Echo is 1/4 of the XP's price from 3-4 years ago!

  6. #6

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    Save some money and get a TFO pro series. I just spent a week up there chasing salmon, and gave mine a serious work-out. I can't say enough good things about the pro series rods. When you look at the price, lifetime warranty and the quality, it's tough to beat. I own a 5, 6, and 8 weight and LOVE them all! Our guide has tried tons of rods, I let him fish my TFO for a bit and he too liked them alot.

  7. #7
    Member jakec5253's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    Echo. And that's from a life-long Sage fan. This summer I learned that really good performing rods don't have to have $600+ price tags. I fished Echos along side my XP and wife's VT2 and was really impressed. The Echo is 1/4 of the XP's price from 3-4 years ago!
    I agree with Mr. Pid on the Echo rods as well, but I wouldn't put them in the same class as the Z-Axis. I bought two Echo rods this year, a 10ft 6wt Ion, and a 10ft 8wt Ion. The 8wt is a back up rod, and the 6wt is to fill a gap that I couldn't afford to fill with another Sage. They are great casting, sensitive rods, but are quite a bit heaiver than the upper end rods. I can tell a big difference casting the 8wt vs throwing the 8wt Z-Axis. But as was pointed out, you could buy three Echo's for the price of one Z-axis, and still have some money left over.

    Jake
    All the romance of trout fishing exists in the mind of the angler and is in no way shared by the fish.

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    Member G_Smolt's Avatar
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    Default

    If you are dead-set on choosing between a Sage and a Winston, I would go to the nearest shop that stocks both brands. I would line up both rods with the same line, then cast until I made my decision. Not that any of the folks on message boards are wrong, but I certainly wouldn't base a $700 decision on what I read on the internet.

    Having said that, I sold all my Z-axis rods save for the 8110. I have been steadily collecting the BII-x and the BII-mx series for about 5 years now, and I'm pretty sure I made the right decision for my particular casting idiosyncrasies.

    And if you want the best rod for your stroke, you should do yourself a favor and cast as many different 8wts as you can. Echo makes a **** good rod for under $200, Beulah makes a fine twig for about $250, and TFO also sells a wide variety of inexpensive rods. But don't limit yourself to a certain brand and line...you might find out that you really don't like that rod after all.

  9. #9

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    If you a can build a fly rod, build a five rivers FT. You can go to this site www.dancraftent.com. Dan has rod building kit with FT blanks. You will never look a sage again...

  10. #10
    Member Scottsum's Avatar
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    Default Try before you buy...

    Quote Originally Posted by G_Smolt View Post
    If you are dead-set on choosing between a Sage and a Winston, I would go to the nearest shop that stocks both brands. I would line up both rods with the same line, then cast until I made my decision. Not that any of the folks on message boards are wrong, but I certainly wouldn't base a $700 decision on what I read on the internet.

    Having said that, I sold all my Z-axis rods save for the 8110. I have been steadily collecting the BII-x and the BII-mx series for about 5 years now, and I'm pretty sure I made the right decision for my particular casting idiosyncrasies.

    And if you want the best rod for your stroke, you should do yourself a favor and cast as many different 8wts as you can. Echo makes a **** good rod for under $200, Beulah makes a fine twig for about $250, and TFO also sells a wide variety of inexpensive rods. But don't limit yourself to a certain brand and line...you might find out that you really don't like that rod after all.


    I'll second G Smolt's advice. I truly love all of my Sage rods, but I won't say that I love all of Sage's rods. Every action is a little bit different and you can't know for sure until you've tried them out. Some shops even have demo rods that you can take to the stream to try-out for the day to see if you really like a given rod. You should always cast a number of different rods before making your decision.

  11. #11
    Member Wyatt's Avatar
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    Default

    I'm a fan of Beulah in the mid-price range, but if $675 doesn't give you sticker shock, cast a Loomis Native Run GLX 9' 6" 7 weight!

  12. #12

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    Go casat them to make your decission period, that is the only way to make a real choice. Everyone casts different and one is going to fit you better than the other.


    As for the new 99's from Sage. I have cast the 5 and 7wt rods and they are a nice stick but a little different. It has a fast action tip with a moderate butt end. The purpose of this design was to create a wider loop for the junk in the trunk (i.e indicators, lead and double fly)setups. I cast the one with a new Rio indicator line in a 5wt and a Rio outbound short on the 7wt. If you are a indicator junkie then these rods will be worth a test drive.


    Again, my recommendation is to always cast some rods before you buy, they are just to expensive to make a judgement call based on other peoples opinion.

  13. #13
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    Default

    FWIW, I've never "test driven" a rod before I bought it. Once on the water I've quickly adjusted to my different rods and enjoy each one. Its sort of like dealing with shifting winds and brushy banks. Or breaking your primary rod mid-trip and switching to a slower action back-up. That's part of the fun.

  14. #14
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    Test them all out and make you decision on that. Everyones casting stroke is a bit different and you may notice that you perform better with certain rods.

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