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  1. #1

    Default rookie question

    Ive been sitting on a spot the last 2 nites where im seeing upwards of 10-15 cows every nite feeding into the same field but havent seen any bulls step out yet. Was thinking of hanging a tree stand and focusing on this for the rest of the season. When there is a large concentration of cows in one area is it just a matter of time before a bull steps out? Was thinking of hanging a tree stand. Any advice.

  2. #2

    Wink

    Certainly a good indication of it being a Moosy location, but not a slam dunk by any means. With that many cows around, it is more likely you will see a young spike/fork hanging out with mom, than a big bull looking for a harem. If this spot is easily accessible the bigger bulls will avoid it, if remote they will eventually show up, but the rut is only now beginning to alter their minds.
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  3. #3
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Default

    I would go a half of mile or so back from where they are comming out.

  4. #4
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    Default Early birds get the worms...

    Quote Originally Posted by geoff156 View Post
    Ive been sitting on a spot the last 2 nites where im seeing upwards of 10-15 cows every nite feeding into the same field but havent seen any bulls step out yet. Was thinking of hanging a tree stand and focusing on this for the rest of the season. When there is a large concentration of cows in one area is it just a matter of time before a bull steps out? Was thinking of hanging a tree stand. Any advice.
    If you see that many cows in a group, it has been my experience that you will see a sizable bull in the vicinity. Paddles and Forks usually don't have the clout to round up that many cows early on... Besides that, bulls stop eating during the rut so you won't see them munching the bushes like the cows. We're in early stages of the rut so there's some variables;

    You also need to consider how many of those are calves or yearlings. If there's a few cows with twin calves, they add up pretty fast and the previous comment about a possible sub-legal bull hoarding them is a good bet. The calves and yearlings won't be a breeding stock and are just hanging out because their mom is there (those hussies).

    My advice is to keep doing what you are doing and put up the tree stand. Spend some time hamming up on your tending "cow mew" which sounds like the word "ear". Start the word like you are going to mimic a dog whimper and finish it as close to a "uh" like a bull grunt. It has worked for me to get bulls to come out and at least get a peak at them.

    The more appropriate (and probably more likely to get results) method is to rake the trees nearby when the cows come out. If a bull exists and it is indeed a harem, he'll come out to see who is challenging him. Don't get too carried away with the brush thrashing though; a few seconds is all it takes once you've seen the majority of the cows pop out. If you sound too aggressive and he's a smaller bull; he'll avoid the confrontation and bogey. The big boys stick around and are willing to take their licks.

    Good luck, let us know how it turns out; hopefully we'll be seeing the photos.
    "He who is slow to anger is better than the mighty, and he who rules his spirit is better than he who takes a city." ~ Proverbs 16:32

  5. #5
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    Default Be Careful

    You don't want to scare them off...

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