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Thread: Looking for 4-Stroke Advice

  1. #1
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    Default Looking for 4-Stroke Advice

    I'm gearing up for summer 2010 and I have a 16' Klamath. I want to power with a 4-Stroke because I plan to be in the Kenai system 80% of the time. My boat is rated for 55 hp. Questions: Which model would you recommend? I do plan to be in the salt water and would like to ability to go from point A to point B quickly, but at the same time would like to troll/back-troll as well. How much moter do I need?

  2. #2

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    With a 16ft boat like that a 40hp should do very well, even when loaded heavy.

    Before I put a jet kit on my 55hp mounted to my 16ft jon boat I could carry all the weight I wanted until I ran out of freeboard and still 31-33mph, with just me, my rifle and pack that thing would do 42mph, it was crazy.

    35-40 prop hp I think would be ideal.

    Never owned a 4stroke myself (yet) but I would investigate Yamaha vs. Honda thoroughly for any advantage. I do know that both manufacture high quality reliable products, whatever they be.

  3. #3

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    I used a 40 efi 4-stroke on my v-hull 16' aluminum and it was underpowered when loaded for a full day. I could mess with props and get near what I wanted but it just wasn`t enough. I`d shoot for the 50 and all are good so it`s more a matter of preference and service available...most here will lean towards Yamaha. Check out the Tohatsu dfi 2-strokes (Kenai legal) they have more bottom end power than a heavy 4-stroke. Heck, my 9.9 4-stroke is 85#s!

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    A 2-stroke with more low-end power than a comparable 4-stroke? Seriously? Can you back that statement up?

  5. #5

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    I am running a 16' heavy aluminum skiff with a mercury 50 EFI four stroke and I'm really happy with the motor. It performs very well, and the whole boat and motor weights about 1400lbs. I can't imagine that a 2-stoke would have any more holeshot than this motor - I can waterski behind it, and I'm 220lbs. Incredibly fuel efficient, quiet, and reliable starter. For this block size, the weight differences between 2s and 4s are quite minimal, tipping the odds in favor of 4s for me. I think trailerboats did a 50HP shootout, I saw it online. check that out.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LxqS3HEptj4

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    A 2-stroke with more low-end power than a comparable 4-stroke? Seriously? Can you back that statement up?
    Normally the 4-stroke is heavier albeit less of a difference in a smaller outboard but none the less a 2-stroke is lighter than a 4-stroke for virtually every HP size.

    It is common knowledge (if mechanically inclined) that a 2-stroke makes power on each side of the piston stroke while a 4-stroke does it only on one stroke.

    Not to say a 4-stroke doesn`t make good power but pound for pound can`t and won`t produce as much in stock form. There is a good reason why people that want a hole-shot go to the 2-strokes especially when talking jet units.

    I`ll give the economy and emissions to the 4-strokes but not much more. This has been debated before and the threads are there if you want more info.

    Fact, running a 2-stroke 9.9 on my 12' aluminum produces top speed almost 10 seconds quicker than my 4-stroke and actually carries just a bit more than 4 mph better than the newer 4-stroke...simple math for me. Some of the this is due to a drastic weight difference between the two models, some of it is the lack of power stroke in one 1/2 the time.

    Clear as mud???

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    What's clear is that your contention is contrary to my experience. I'd like to see some data.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    What's clear is that your contention is contrary to my experience. I'd like to see some data.
    Will this in some way help the original poster or do you have a propensity to argue without actually providing any info? I put in my experience...share yours and the poster can decide if it`s enough to help. I would be interested to see some positive input/experiences for the poster...anything else would be considered trolling.

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    Read the "bottom line on outboard jets" thread. It delineates my recent 2-stroke vs 4-stroke experience. My question to you was genuine.

    To the original poster? My choice in the 40-50 prop category would come down to Yamaha (Dewey's) and Suzuki (Anc Yamaha) 4-strokes.

  10. #10

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    A bit of info. on the 2-stroke dfi vs. 4-stroke if interested...was what I already knew but some are lost in the fray.

    http://www.marineenginedigest.com/sp...sus4stroke.htm

  11. #11

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    size class of motors makes a difference. In the 50HP size, I've found the weight of units to be very similar. I believe a 50 ETEC weighs more than my 4-stroke... as was pointed out, this is different for 10HP outboards, or 90HP outboards..

    I've run a 50 2-stroke on the same hull that carries my 50 4-stroke and the 4-stroke is as fast out of the hole, but also uses much less gas, much quieter, no stink, etc.

    I'm looking for a 90 to use with a jet pump however, and for that application I definitely want a 2-stroke...

  12. #12

    Default To me it would depend......

    ...on if you wanted to rig it up with controls or use a tiller. The klamath hulls are very efficient because they are flat through most of the hull and they are relatively light. This allows them to plane at slow speeds. I've had an 18' offshore with a 35 Hp on it, and now have a 15' Western with a 25 hp on it. You may want to go fast in the ocean, but my experience is usually the weather doesn't permit it. The hulls run great up to about 25 mph, weather permitting, and I wouldn't recommend trying to go faster than that in a Klamath. I like Yamahas and Mercs. I would definitely get something with EFI. If you are looking at a tiller setup I would look at the 25 - 30 Hp range and stick with manual tilt and recoil start. If you want electric start and power trim and tilt go with a center console and a 30 - 40 hp. This will balance your weight better in boat. Good luck and enjoy. They are very capable boats, just remember there is no replacement for common sense.

  13. #13

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    50 hp Honda.

  14. #14
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    Thanks one and all. I've got a fairly clear idea now. Hope to see you all at the fish-cleaning dock.

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    I will throw in my pitch for the Suzuki guys at Peninsula Powersports. I would put a 50hp Suzuki on the stern. You will not find better guys to work with. Give Nate or Zac a call when your deciding. They sell Suzuki, run them and work on them and will go the extra mile. 283-5294

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by bobshem View Post
    50 hp Honda.
    Honda makes the lightest weight 50 Hp 4-stroke, and they are very reliable engines.

    But 4-stroke Yamaha, Merc, Suzuki are all good engines in this size range.
    I can't come to bed right now honey - somebody on the internet is wrong.

    When you believe in things you don't understand, then you suffer . . . " - Stevie Wonder

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