Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Need Help Find Good Deals on Wheels/Tires from the lower 48...any ideas?

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula
    Posts
    25

    Default Need Help Find Good Deals on Wheels/Tires from the lower 48...any ideas?

    I am looking at ordering wheels and tires for my 07 Rhino and was wondering if anyone has a connection with a good supplier and shipping options....Or if there is anywhere in Alaska to get good deals on new or used....

    Thanks,

    AK1032

  2. #2

    Default Aftermarket companies

    Check out the websites like Highlifter, Yaskey, Gorilla, etc... Many times they run clearances and such. The last time I ordered tires it was cheaper to have my choice of tire shipped UPS ground from Highlifter in Louisianna than to buy a lesser tire up here.

    As for tires up here at this point in the season there are very few choices remaining. American Tire used to have a good selection but they might have dropped the ATV tires. Johnson's Tire sells some quality tires as do the ATV shops. As I stated though the selection is very low this time of year.

    Hope this helps,
    Dan
    It is nice to know that there are "ALASKANS" out there, no matter where they live.

  3. #3

    Default JCWhitney

    I don't know of anyone that will beat JCWhitney for shipping tires to Alaska. JCWhitney doesn't have the largest selection of tires, but if they have what you want then their shipping is CHEAP and relatively fast.

  4. #4

    Default

    Try Motosports.com they have free shipping to AK and the prices of the tires/wheels are very reasonable.

  5. #5
    Member byrd_hntr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Squarebanks
    Posts
    661

    Default JCWhitney

    I second JC. Motorsports.com doesn't ship for free to AK anymore last time I looked at their website. I ordered 4 Mudlites and they showed up in 5 days from JCW. Mounted the tires in my driveway in about an hour. With a handyman jack to bust the beads and an air compressor. Saved myself about 300 dollars from what the folks down at the Alaska Fun Center quoted me for the same tires. That's a lot of gas money.

    my .02

  6. #6
    Member EagleRiverDee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    725

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by byrd_hntr View Post
    I second JC. Motorsports.com doesn't ship for free to AK anymore last time I looked at their website. I ordered 4 Mudlites and they showed up in 5 days from JCW. Mounted the tires in my driveway in about an hour. With a handyman jack to bust the beads and an air compressor. Saved myself about 300 dollars from what the folks down at the Alaska Fun Center quoted me for the same tires. That's a lot of gas money.

    my .02
    Can you describe how you used the handyman jack to bust the bead? Please? We tried driving over it with a truck right next to the rim and it didn't work, I'm interested in your method.
    "If snowmachiners would adopt the habits of riding one at a time and not parking at the base of avalanche prone slopes, the number of fatalities would likely be whittled by at least a third, if not by half." ~ Jill Fredston, in the book Snowstruck, In The Grip Of Avalanches.

  7. #7
    Member byrd_hntr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Squarebanks
    Posts
    661

    Default breaking down tires with a handyman jack

    Ive never had any luck driving over a tire to break the bead.

    You need something heavy. I use my truck with a 350 gallon tank of water in the back. Let all but about a pound of air out of your tire. Place a 2x4 or something on the ground right under the receiver hitch or bumper of your "heavy truck". Put the tire on top of the 2x4 so that the edge is right next to the rim. Use the handyman on the other side to break the bead. As pressure is place on the sidewall of the tire make sure you keep the handyman as close to the bead as you can. Oftentimes one side is a little tougher to break than the other side. Im my case the front of the rim (outside) is harder to break than the back. I do the hard side first then the easy side. Use a couple of big screwdrivers and some dish soap to ge the tire off once it broken. Getting the new tire on is pretty easy just watch those beads, if you rip one they often ruin the tire. Use lots of soap, its cheap compared to the tires.

    Good luck.

  8. #8
    Member atvalaska's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    camp-go-4-beer fbks
    Posts
    630

    Lightbulb break the bead..

    i took a 4"x12" plank 4' long . cut a 1/2 moon in one end. lay tire w/rim u want off on a pice of plywood . place the wood can opener u just made,"rite at the edge" of tire rim (lean toward the rim), drive front of pick up truck up "ramp".... BAM ... tire off/ flip over and do it again. done. (15 to 20 bucks to get tires changed out will by alot of beer...)
    WHEN IN DOUBT> THROTTLE OUT.......

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •