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Thread: Kimber Montana

  1. #1
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    Default Kimber Montana

    Well....finally got a chance to shoot the Kimber montana in 300 Win I picked up a while ago. Ive got to say I was a little nervouse with all the bad mouthing that goes on about Kimbers but I really liked the gun and heard enough good stuff to take a chance. All I can say is after about the fifth shot I felt like a teenage boy who just got kissed for the first time. Federal premiums with 180grain Barnes TSX were grouping at .45 MOA !!!!! I'm in love!!!! They do start wandering after #3 do to the thin barrell but I have never had to pull a trigger more than twice anyway and the barrell cools off pretty fast with the bolt open. Thank you Lord for a shooter!
    In the Bush

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    How do we reconcile .45 MOA with wandering on the the third shot?

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    It sounds like you have a good one. What was your five shot group size?

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    Barrell heats up really fast so only did one 5 shot group. It took me five to get it dialed in.....3 shots...clean it while its cooling....2 shots...LORD this thing shoots...one more shot to make three after I stopped giggling.....clean it while its cooling......three more shots after pinching myself to make sure I wasnt dreaming....not dreaming...then wanted to see how much it would take before drift so shot five...barrell heats up FAST with average spread being a little over an inch. Hot barrells are like hot transmissions...not a good thing...wont shoot over three without cool down. Ive got a new girl friend
    In the Bush

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    so what was the group size again?

  6. #6

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    The kimber factory only shoots two shot groups. When I sent in my 270 wsm Monatana for repair, the returned it to me with a two shot group Measuring about an inch and a half and two pieces of once fired brass. The rifle passed their criteria for accuracy. They had the rifle for several months only to fire it twice. I guess they are very busy with repairs.

    From this it appears that Kimbers only need to shoot a two shot group for comparative accuracy.....

    This practice seems to have infiltrated the kimber woobies....

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    Member pinehavensredrocket's Avatar
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    i have heard some negative comments on the kimbers but personally have found them to be great rifles. with a proper barrel break-in and trigger adjustment, my rifles are exceptional shooters.

    my 8400 has taken elk (in difficult circumstances) and my 84's a "ton" of deer.

    this montana is a favorite....and shoots 1.033 at 200yds with 165gr bullets!
    happy trails.
    jh

  8. #8

    Default Agree on the barrel heat up!

    My Kimber .338 Fed heats up fast as well. I only shoot 3 shot groups and then let it cool and bore snake it before shooting again. It loves Barnes TSX 185 gr and Speer HotCor 200 gr bullets. Shoots MOA at 100 and 200 yds, haven't tried it past that yet. Took a coyote with it this past week while deer hunting. The weight savings is worth the limitations at the range and the accuracy gained in the field. A very fine weapon.

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    Default Group size for the 300win

    Now I may be doing this wrong but this is what I do...if Im wrong I would like to do it the right way. The 3 shot grouped at .45...center of first hole measured to center of second hole....center of first hole measured to center of third hole....both measurements added and divided by two for the average group. The five shot grouped at a hair over an inch (math done the same way)...shots taken about 10 seconds apart. Rifle was in a lead sled with 30 pounds of shot in the forward tray. I have shot a couple of boxes of ammo through it some groups at "one hole torn out on both sides" and some bigger than .45.....45 was an average so far. Now if i did a five shot group and took five minutes between shots it would do much better I think.....Im going to try that next....there are so many variables. Heck my worst group so far was after my 4 shot moca with extra wip cream
    In the Bush

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    Quote Originally Posted by Akjaq View Post
    Now I may be doing this wrong but this is what I do...if Im wrong I would like to do it the right way. The 3 shot grouped at .45...center of first hole measured to center of second hole....center of first hole measured to center of third hole....both measurements added and divided by two for the average group. The five shot grouped at a hair over an inch (math done the same way)...shots taken about 10 seconds apart. Rifle was in a lead sled with 30 pounds of shot in the forward tray. I have shot a couple of boxes of ammo through it some groups at "one hole torn out on both sides" and some bigger than .45.....45 was an average so far. Now if i did a five shot group and took five minutes between shots it would do much better I think.....Im going to try that next....there are so many variables. Heck my worst group so far was after my 4 shot moca with extra wip cream
    I have never heard of that method before.


    The distance between the two most distant holes of the group is the only way I have used. Some guys use center to center of the outer holes but most use the outside to outside measurement of the two holes, which is what I do. Using centers it’s harder to determine the point to measure and possible to get group sizes that measure smaller than bullet diameter so it’s more common to use the outside edge of the holes.


    Since flyers (one that lands far outside the others) are often the shooter and not the gun they may, or may not be counted as one of the outside holes, but if not counted should still be noted as a caveat to the measurement.
    Andy
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    Default Center to center

    To get your center to center measurement, simply lay your target on a table and with your calipers measure from the inside edge of the farthest to one side to the outside edge of the farthest on the other side. You are measureing the full width of one hole and none of the width if the other so dividing the width of one by two get you in the center of both. Harder to read and understand than to see and understand.

    Everybody confused yet?

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    Outside to outside of the furthest holes, subtract bullet diameter. Using the method cited by Akjaq, I have shot groups that were so small the dissapeared

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wildalaska View Post
    I have shot groups that were so small the dissapeared
    Me also, but for me it is because I MISSED the entire target frame......

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    Default 0 spread

    0 spread would be the bullet going through the same hole every time...measured from center to center. If you use the outside meathod your smallest spread could never be smaller than bullett diameter. It wouldnt be fare to say Ive got a Wild West modified GG 45-70 that prints .458 and my Les Bar prints .224.
    In the Bush

  15. #15

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    "The 3 shot grouped at .45...center of first hole measured to center of second hole....center of first hole measured to center of third hole....both measurements added and divided by two for the average group. The five shot grouped at a hair over an inch (math done the same way)..."

    AKJAQ,

    Now I'm confused....a picture is really worth a thousand words.

    Post a picture of your groups with a reference( such as a ruler) and we can all take a stab at measuring your group with our own methods.

    Sean

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    Member Akheloce's Avatar
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    So I've been shooting a Brown Bess flintlock .75 cal, and at 5 yards, it only shoots 3/4" groups... is there anything I can do to tighten it up?

    I also measure center to center... it's the only way to make it fair from caliber to caliber.

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    Heavily chrome the barrell and use .72 balls for a 30 thousandths reduction in spread If one were to own a .97 caliber big bore could you build it to be a sub MOA tack driver with an MOA being .96" / 2.908 centimeters @ 100 yards
    Im not in the habit of tak'n pics but Ill see if my wife will let me use her camera so I can try to make more sense.
    In the Bush

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    The distance between the two centers of the most distant holes. So the easiest way is to take a caliper and measure from the outsides of the farthest bullet holes and subtract the bullet diameter. This is the way I do it. I didn't know there was another way.

    That's awsome you have a shooter. I have one in .325 as well and get .35-.45" groups. I shoot 180 TSX as well and I like to clean them every 5 shots or so to keep accuracy up and the barrel in good shape. When I shoot from the bench I always give it 10-15 minutes between shots to work up loads. I'm going to eventually buy a M84 in 7mm-08 for a sheep rifle. At 5lbs. 2 oz. it's the best thing going on the market bar NONE. Most of the custom sheep rifles even those costing 3-5x as much weigh as much or more!!! For $1150 or so it is unbeatable!!!!

    Brett

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brett Adam Barringer View Post

    I have one in .325 as well and get .35-.45" groups.
    Brett

    I'd like to see pics of that...how many shots by the way and at what distance

    I'm going to eventually buy a M84 in 7mm-08 for a sheep rifle. At 5lbs. 2 oz. it's the best thing going on the market bar NONE. Most of the custom sheep rifles even those costing 3-5x as much weigh as much or more!!! For $1150 or so it is unbeatable!!!!
    Dont want to dis the gunwoobie, but the mere fact you may have one that may shoot doesnt mean the next guy is going to get one...and with Kimbers lousy customer service, Kimber sure as heck isnt even close to the best thing on the market.

    You want light? get the Browning Ti

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wildalaska View Post
    I'd like to see pics of that...how many shots by the way and at what distance

    Dont want to dis the gunwoobie, but the mere fact you may have one that may shoot doesnt mean the next guy is going to get one...and with Kimbers lousy customer service, Kimber sure as heck isnt even close to the best thing on the market.

    You want light? get the Browning Ti
    Some one rolled out of the wrong side of bed! 3 shot groups at 100 yards with 180gr TSX 62 gr RL 15 handloads. That's with a 7 power scope. With a 12 or 14 I'm sure I'd do better. Sorry I don't frame my targets. I just work up loads, sight in the gun, and go hunting.

    I don't like Brownings. Just a personal choice thing. If someone else likes them that's fine. They are relatively inexpensive, have good customer service, and never have problems with their rifles. That said the Kimber has all the feature I like in a rifle, is moderately priced, and in the M84 in 7mm-08 is lighter weight than the Browning Ti. That said I could strike out with a bum rifle, but that's a chance I'm willing to take. I do however think it's the best light weight factory rifle on the market when they get it right for the reasons mentioned above. I understand that for some people taking that chance after paying that much money is unacceptable and that's alright and understandable. So enjoy your Browning and I'll enjoy my Kimber.

    Brett

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