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Thread: Alaska Shooting

  1. #1
    New member AkBubba's Avatar
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    Talking Alaska Shooting

    The name of this Forum is Alaska Shooting so I feel the need to contribute.

    If you are going to live in Fairbanks you just have to buck up and do it




  2. #2

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    Don't have to worry about the barrel heating up. Good time to take out the ultra light rifle with the buggy whip barrel.

  3. #3
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    It was a good thing the stock is not made of steel

    I like shooting at the range, but during the Spring and summer.

  4. #4
    New member AkBubba's Avatar
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    Default Steel

    Very little steel actually. Carbon wrapped barrel, titanium action, graphite stock.

  5. #5
    Member Kay9Cop's Avatar
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    My wife and I were at the South Cushman range for 4 and a half hours yesterday before we finally got cold enough to leave. The only problem we had was the moisture from our breath freezing our eyelids shut and the tape wouldn't stick to the cardboard box to hold our targets in place. Her Remington 700 Mountain Rifle in .30-06 was still able to heat the barrel after five rounds but my stainless Encore barrels never even got warm to the touch.

    Any thoughts on accuracy or changes in point of impact in really cold weather?

    Looking at your pictures, you must have got there right after we left. The sun was just starting to set when we left and that's our box on the left.

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    AkBubba isn't cool how the rubber feet on your benchrest get hard in the cold and the whole thing starts sliding all over the metal bench. I usually put a sock under each foot to keep the benchrest from sliding around. What kind of groups did you shoot in that temp?

  7. #7
    New member AkBubba's Avatar
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    Default shooting

    I was there today from 1:45 to 3:15. There was only a couple of Russian guys there during that time.

    The feet on my benchrest got real slippery. I had to lay a towel down and that took care of it.

    The gun shoots fine in these temps. I was grouping well under an inch at 100. The powder does burn different and I'm still trying to figure that out. I'm using IMR 4350 and RL25.

    One thing that did happen is my leupold base broke. Well, not the base but the screw that locks the rear ring to the base literally chipped/broke/shattered off so I had to stop shooting.

    Fortunately Nightforce Scopes is sending me their base and rings for my "Arctic Testing".

    Their scopes are tested at -80 (lab) and that is why I was at the range. In the 25 or so rounds I sent down range making major adjustments to elevation the scope performed flawless. I would make 20 MOA adjustments, fire then back and fire again and it was perfect. I know of several scopes that can't do that at sub-zero temps. The grease just turns to puddy and something fails.

    Anyway, it was a good time and glad to hear I'm not the only one that enjoys getting out and popping rounds when it is a tad nippy

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    Man isn't that the truth. Thats damm impressive that the NF made accurate adjustments at that temp,I too have seen many scopes that will not including VX-III's.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AkBubba View Post
    Very little steel actually. Carbon wrapped barrel, titanium action, graphite stock.
    Can you imagine a face stuck to a solid steel stock? That's what I was thinking (big grin).

  10. #10
    Member Kay9Cop's Avatar
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    I don't know about a face but my fleece balacalava had ice on it from my breath and was sticking to my Encore's synthetic stock.

  11. #11
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    Smile

    Did ya notice that it doesn't get very busy at the range this time of year?
    The Marines I have seen around the world have the cleanest bodies, the filthiest minds, the highest morale, and the lowest morals of any group of animals I have ever seen. Thank God for the United States Marine Corps! (Eleanor Roosevelt, 1945)

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    How about an indoor rifle range? Say 200 yds..
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

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    Actually Snyd all you really need is an indoor shooting area with and outside range. If you could sit in a warm place to shoot, then bundle up and head out to put up and retrieve targets. I have seen a few guys in Delta J do this with a garage a wood stove and sliding window. Much nicer than sitting at the bench at -20 or colder.

  14. #14
    New member AkBubba's Avatar
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    I do have access to a collapsable shelter with heat. Sets up in under 30 seconds. Big enough for 10 people to stand in and has a large roll down front. I could call it training

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    Default Embarassed

    Few years ago I took my .300 winchester out to the Cushman range. I think it was about -37 F but was intending to pay my respects to the caribou and had handloaded some barnes X 220's, so I needed to veriefy. Missfired five times in a row and was going slowly insane, thought I had a bad batch of primers or some such. I looked closer and noticed the primers were only lightly dented and realised what I'd done wrong. I had put rifle away a few months earlier and, by reflex, had lubed the firing pin/bolt interior for preservation. I had not cleaned out the lube (left over bottle of CLP from the military) and at that temperature it had the consistency of nearly hardened epoxy Sigh, took weeks to live that down with my friends.

  16. #16
    New member AkBubba's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDE View Post
    Few years ago I took my .300 winchester out to the Cushman range. I think it was about -37 F but was intending to pay my respects to the caribou and had handloaded some barnes X 220's, so I needed to veriefy. Missfired five times in a row and was going slowly insane, thought I had a bad batch of primers or some such. I looked closer and noticed the primers were only lightly dented and realised what I'd done wrong. I had put rifle away a few months earlier and, by reflex, had lubed the firing pin/bolt interior for preservation. I had not cleaned out the lube (left over bottle of CLP from the military) and at that temperature it had the consistency of nearly hardened epoxy Sigh, took weeks to live that down with my friends.
    The range is the best place to learn that lesson. Being from a warm climate in the past I would have never thought of it.

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    Cool I feel your pain

    I live in Seward and with rain snow wind and cool temps it kinda hard to get to the range oh and did i mention to work word. We have a boyscout working on his eagle project building a 2 bay inclosure I can hardly weight.

  18. #18

    Default cold

    so cryogenic tempering is a free process if you live in Fairbanks, all you have to do is leave the gun outside overnight.

  19. #19
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    Default cold temps

    Just what is the true caliber of a .308 barrel at -50? Do we pack our gear in dry ice to warm it up? Just how much does a monlithic shrink versus a jacketed lead? Will we have to qualify our loads as a 301 NATO Alaskan or 370 H&H Alaskan?

    UAF has already achieved super conduction of metals at room temperature.

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