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Thread: Coming to Alaska and was wondering what grain of bullet I need

  1. #1
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    Default Coming to Alaska and was wondering what grain of bullet I need

    Hello to Everyone on this forum. This is my first post. I will coming to live in Alaska in January. We are so excited. I just purchased a Ruger M77 Mark II 338 Win Mag. I was wondering if Federal 210 grain Nosler Partitions would be a good bullet to use on moose, caribou and if needed the big bears. Or do you guys recommend I go up to a 225 grain? I have never shot anything this big. I will be looking to buy a nice scope to put on it as well. Any recommendations on a scope and the correct ammo needed to hunt up there would be greatly appreciated. Thanks

    Rick

  2. #2

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    That's the rifle and caliber I have, and love mine! Either 210 grain or 225 will do fine, see what shoots best in your rifle.

    When you get a scope - don't go overboard on power, and make sure that the scope has plenty of eye relief, as the .338 delivers a sharp, fast jab in terms of recoil. A 1.5x - 6x or 2x -7x variable is a good option, and don't forget that eye relief.

  3. #3

    Thumbs up Yup...

    I have a strong opinion after 34 years of killing critters with a.338 Win. Mag. The .338 Win. Mag. is perfect for most moose and bear hunting. Ruger makes a good and solid rifle. The 210 grain Nosler Partition will put the hurt on any Alaskan animal. It is a very good bullet to start with. For several reasons I think the 2.5 X 8 by 36 mm Leupold scope is about as good as it gets for an all around Alaskan hunting scope. The above combination allows you to shoot as far as any hunter should at a moose or bear. Go for it!

  4. #4

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    I prefer 225 grain bullets but I personally know others that use the 210s with success. That being said, 210 to 250 grain projectiles will do the job, choose what you and your rifle shoot best.

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    Member B-radford's Avatar
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    Default

    Yup, it sounds good to me. But, if I were you, I would bring a lighter grain along for caribou. 210 seems a bit big if you ask me.

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    Member AKHunterNP's Avatar
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    I love my T/C Pro Hunter in 338 WM. Nothing up here requires anything bigger than 210g bullets, just use the right bullet. I've taken everything except for a griz with 210's. The 338 has a good kick so if you use a heavier bullet expect a good kick. 210 is the way to go.
    "...arms like laws discourage and keep the invader and plunderer in awe...Horrid mischief would ensue were the good deprived of the use of them." -Thomas Paine

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    Member Phil's Avatar
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    Default Leupold

    Seems to me that 210 grain Partitions are plenty big enough. I shoot a 30-06 and mostly like 150 grain Fusions because that is what my rifle "likes". Shoot whatever weight your rifle shoots well.

    That said, make sure your scope says LEUPOLD on it. Power? Whatever your eyes require. I agree that a 2.5 x 8 should allow you to shoot at big animals from as far as you should. However, since I hunt pronghorns my newest scope is 4.5 x 14. Possibly the quick release mounts are a good option since they allow you the option of changing scopes. I have quick release mounts on one of my heavier rifles and I love them. Always return to perfect alignment after using the open sights.
    Last edited by Phil; 09-05-2009 at 06:40. Reason: poor typing skills

  8. #8

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    I shoot a 338 ultra and my rifle just loves 250swift a-frames.

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    Premium Member MarineHawk's Avatar
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    340 Wby here. I'm bringing the 225-gr TTSXs.

    FWIW, shooting carribou with a 250-gr (though more recoil) wil probably do less damage to a carribou than a 200-gr bullet (which is faster and likely will open up more violently). The 250-gr bullet likely will just exit a lot faster (the carribou will slow it down less).

  10. #10
    Member Roger45's Avatar
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    I have shot many a caribou and moose using my .338 with a 210 Nosler Partition bullet. It causes about 1/3 the shock damage my .308 with 180 grain soft point does. The other advantage is that it will shoot farther than my .308. That said, the most important thing to remember is shot placement. It does not matter what you shoot if you can't hit what you are aiming at. Many a moose have been taken in Alaska with a .270 in the hands of good shooters...I personally stay away from the smaller calibers simply because of the the bigger predators (bears) I have run into.
    "...and then Jack chopped down the beanstock, adding murder and ecological vandalism to the theft, enticement and vandalism charges already mentioned, but he got away with it and lived happily ever after without so much as a guilty twinge about what he had done. Which proves that you can be excused just about anything if you're a hero, because no one asks the inconvenient questions." Terry Pratchett's The Hogfather

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    Member 454casull's Avatar
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    Smile Ditto

    Quote Originally Posted by .338 mag. View Post
    I have a strong opinion after 34 years of killing critters with a.338 Win. Mag. The .338 Win. Mag. is perfect for most moose and bear hunting. Ruger makes a good and solid rifle. The 210 grain Nosler Partition will put the hurt on any Alaskan animal. It is a very good bullet to start with. For several reasons I think the 2.5 X 8 by 36 mm Leupold scope is about as good as it gets for an all around Alaskan hunting scope. The above combination allows you to shoot as far as any hunter should at a moose or bear. Go for it!
    I don't have 34 years hunting up here under my belt yet, but my thoughts exactly from 14 years here in Alaska.

  12. #12
    Member martentrapper's Avatar
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    Default

    Even in Anch or Fbks, a box of 20 quality 338's will set you back 50 bucks. You might consider reloading, assuming you don't already. Reloading will give you a much wider selection of bullets to choose from and try out. The inevitable ammo shortages/taxation under our current administration won't affect you as much either.....:-)
    I can't help being a lazy, dumb, weekend warrior.......I have a JOB!
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    Member akgiauque's Avatar
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    Default I prefer 250's

    I have shot a wide assortment of bullets in my 338. I hunted with my 338 for 20 years and have put it away for a new 300 ultra mag. I have shot lots of ammo, factory and reloaded from little 175 X's to 300 gr round nose, the latter kicked like a mule and the lighter bullets wandered on me.
    I have used both 210 and 250 grain Partitions with great success. I prefer the 250's because I had a great load worked up for the rifle and had a very tight group at 100 yards. I also have never had an animal not drop from the 210's, Bears, Goats & Moose and the same can be said for the 250's. I like the bigger bullet if I am in Grizzly territory, That is why I tried the 300 gr bullets out a long time ago, it is not much but the 250's give me a little more piece of mind and I shoot them at game as well.

    Greg

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    Default

    The 210-grain Partition is fine for Alaska, but the 250-grain Partition provides a greater punch, so it's better.

    A 225-grain TSX is in my opinion just as good (maybe better) than the 250-grain Partition if what you want is the most penetration though hide and tissue. I shoot both and can hardly tell the difference (they both kill with authority), except that I may have a better chance to recover a Partition from game than a TSX. I just looked at some Federal ammo loaded with 225-grain TSX at the Sportsman Warehouse, and was shocked by the $65.00 price. However, it would give you peace of mind to buy the best ammo you can afford, specially since you are coming to hunt in Alaska. If the TSX load is too expensive and you want to settle for the reliable Federal ammo with 250-grain Partition at 2,660 fps, go for it. It's a proven bullet/load combination.

  15. #15
    Member Bucksandnoles's Avatar
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    Default

    Im headed to Alaska for the first time, hunting, as well. I will be carrying a 338 also, and found mine to shoot 275gr A-frame the best. It also shot 250gr accubonds well, at 100yds it was putting both in a very tight group. I'll be hunting peninsula brown bear so I'm going with the hardest hitting bullet that my gun shoots well.
    Bullet size and weights shoot very different out of each gun. A very good friend of mine, that does handloading, has made me a believer.

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