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Thread: Ultra light goat/sheep rifle scope??

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    Member akprideinvegas's Avatar
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    Default Ultra light goat/sheep rifle scope??

    Hello all. i just finished my first mountain hunt, successfully getting my billy, but i need a light weight scope. im going to buy a tikka rifle but have not found too many reviews on ultralight scopes. as of now i have found the VX-II 3-9x33mm Ultralight which leupold says weighs 8.8 ounces. I still want the magnification and some of the low light shooting conditions along with the weight issues. Just looking for your thoughts

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by akprideinvegas View Post
    Hello all. i just finished my first mountain hunt, successfully getting my billy, but i need a light weight scope. im going to buy a tikka rifle but have not found too many reviews on ultralight scopes. as of now i have found the VX-II 3-9x33mm Ultralight which leupold says weighs 8.8 ounces. I still want the magnification and some of the low light shooting conditions along with the weight issues. Just looking for your thoughts
    Alaska_Lanche just picked up that little Leupy for his Kimber and so far he seems happy w/ it. Perhaps he will chime in but I think he is already out chasing moose.

  3. #3

    Default Ultralight Scope

    I have the Leupold Ultralight VX-II 3-9x33 on a custom .300 WSM and am very happy with it. Similar to your thoughts, I had the rifle built for mountain hunting and shaved numerous ounces off the gun. It didn't make sense to then increase the weight by putting a scope on that weighed a pound or more.

    Comparing a standard 3-9x40 to the 3-9x33 its hard to tell the difference in light gathering abilities.

  4. #4

    Default Leupold

    Leupold VX3 2.5-8X36mm. You'll get better glass and reliability than the VX-II without much weight.
    "Everything that lives and moves will be food for you. Just as I gave you the green plants, I now give you everything."

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    Default reliability

    Blackfoot
    Would you please explain the "better reliability"?

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wingert View Post
    I have the Leupold Ultralight VX-II 3-9x33 on a custom .300 WSM and am very happy with it. Similar to your thoughts, I had the rifle built for mountain hunting and shaved numerous ounces off the gun. It didn't make sense to then increase the weight by putting a scope on that weighed a pound or more.

    Comparing a standard 3-9x40 to the 3-9x33 its hard to tell the difference in light gathering abilities.
    LuJon,

    The moose chasing starts tomorrow. Yes I put a VX-II 3-9X33 on my Kimber Montana .308. The whole setup loaded up with rifle,rings,scope, and 4 in the mag is 5 lbs 13 oz. I have a VX-II 3-9X40 on my Ruger .338 WM and honestly I can not tell one bit of difference between the two other than the weight oh and price I don't think you can go wrong with it. Not sure what blackfoot is referring to as far as better glass and reliability. All I need in a rifle scope is decent light gathering, waterproof, and holds zero. Granted my dad's Zeiss Conquest might gather light a little better, but not to the point where I wouldn't take a shot due to darkness with the VX-II and would with the Zeiss. I'd save my pennies and go with the VX-II and spend the difference on something else you need for hunting. Spotting scope or binos?? You'll spend A LOT more time looking through those on a given hunt than a rifle scope. In fact I've said this before, the time spent through a binos for me in a given hunting season is best measured in days, in a spotter is measured in hours, riflescope in seconds. You can't shoot what ya can't find in the first place. Long as your rifle holds zero and won't fill up with water when dunked in a creek or the like thats all I demand out of my scopes. Good luck in yoru search for scopes. Oh and congrats on the billy, but unless we get to see pics it doesn't count

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    Working from memory, the 2.5x compact leupold weighs about 6.5 oz, the bigger 1x4 and 1.5x5 variables weigh about 9 oz, the fixed 4x weighs a bit over 9 oz, the fixed 6x with the 36mm objective weighs less than 11 oz, and the compact 2x7 and 3x9 are pretty doggone light at 8-9 oz.

    I currently own a compact 2x7, a compact 2.5x, the VXII 1x4, the VXIII 1.5x5, a fixed 4x, a fixed 6x, and a VXII 2x7. I sold a compact 3x9. The only complaint I have with the compact variable scopes is that eye positioning behind the scope is more critical than the larger fixed and variable scopes. The medium magnification fixed scopes are the opposite - the "box" for eye positioning behind the scope to see a full, good view is very large. Same story for the low to medium powered variables. The big eyebox is a good thing if you have to acquire a target quickly (think a griz that's too close for comfort, or a moose moving through the brush).

    I'm a fan of "less is more" when it comes to the physical size of scopes. I like the straight tube scopes that don't have big objective lenses hanging out in the breeze to bang on things.

    Another thought, and this is just my opinion. If you as a shooter cannot get a good enough sight picture with a 4x scope to make a shot at as far as you should be shooting with any scope and any cartridge, the problem is not with the scope...

    My primary light rifle in 30-06 wears a 1.5x5 VX3, and it works great. If you think you need a high magnification scope, I'd get the fixed 6x, as that's never a bad choice, and neither is the fixed 4x.

    If you think you need a high powered scope to develop precise loads at the range, you don't, but some folks develop loads with a high powered scope and switch to a lower magnification scope to hunt with.

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    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    I have been using the Leupold 3 x 9 previously called "compact", now I think "ultralight" since the late '80's on my sheep rifles without a complaint to date. I was once swept down a river with my rifle (not on purpose - stepped off an edge by accident one night in the DCUA and it was not until just before the third waterfall that I was able to scramble out still holding my rifle and trekking pole!!) I hit (more like bounced off) several boulders and the scope and rifle got a bit scraped up but I still use that scope and rifle without a problem. In fact at the range after the above adventure the rifle and scope were still zeroed to where they had been prior to leaving for the hunt! I really like the new ultralights esp. now with the 1/4" click adjustments. My experience has taught me that these scopes are light, tough, and not so big that they catch on every alder I engage. I have never felt wanting more for any shot I have taken and if you buy one and don't like it PM me and I will be glad to take it off your hands. Good luck.

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    Member akprideinvegas's Avatar
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    Thanks guys, I bought one, now I just need to buy a rifle. Haha. But I will get my pics and story uploaded on the forum... Me and my partner both got billies

  10. #10

    Default VX3

    The VX3 does have better glass, or coatings anyway. As far as reilability, I was speaking more to adjustments and holding zero. That was based on the VariX-II with the dial adjustments with no clicks, but I have not had experience with the new ones with click adjustments, so the information could be outdated. I think the new VX2 is very similar to the old VariX III, so it's a heck of a good scope.
    "Everything that lives and moves will be food for you. Just as I gave you the green plants, I now give you everything."

  11. #11

    Default my thoughts...

    I have a 3 x 9 33 mm Leupold Compact and a old Leupold 2.5 x 8 36mm Vari X III. I think the 2.5 x 8 weighs about 11 oz. and the other a bit less. Lets talk eye relief. That 2.5 x 8 is fast, even when zoomed to 6x. If you could compare the 2 of them side by side and zoomed them both to 6x you will see a difference. Then ask your self which one you would want to track a running sheep with.

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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    2.5x8 is one of the best scopes luey makes, according to luey. and i agree check the archives but its the only scope i've ever looked thru that made me say wow and i've had the chance to look thru ALOT of different scopes, i too had the compact/ultralight aths being talked about and its not on my .22, didn't like the small field of view, was harder to get my faced lined into it right and made my eyes work alot harder. now figure in how much you'll actually be looking thru said scope...not much. you'll carry it more than you'll shoot it.
    dont' shave ounces on a scope then toss a huge four strap sling on this thing...figure out a length and do one piece of 1" webbing... when your talking 5 oz of difference on a scope, thats what..one or two bullets difference of weight...4 rocks stuck in your boot tred, one less granola bar, a pair of socks, a terd....i like good glass and a couple oz to me don't matter in the long run. theres other places i could trim rather than my optics. personal op.
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    Member akprideinvegas's Avatar
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    yea, we all shave ounces where possible, to each his own. so my recent goat hunt i looked through my scope for probably a minute, and thats giving me time. so the scope will not fail, and the scope i had on my goat hunt was not optimum field of view, but guess what, you shoot the animal it dies. but the sling is a good idea, i was trying to think of the lightest way, and still be able to carry it.
    NRA life Member JVJ

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    Member c04hoosier's Avatar
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    Default sling...

    I have an Uncle Mike's Mountain Sling that I use for all hunts where weight is a consideration. It's nothing more than a 1" piece of nylon, but has a thin, rubberized piece attached so it won't slide off your shoulder. Very light, but does a fine job. It's the lightest sling that I'm aware of.

    And by the way, I have a Leupold 2-7X VX-II on my lightweight rig. I already had this scope laying around at the time I bought the rifle, or I would have gone with the 3-9X Ultralight. I like it, and 7X is plenty for any reasonable shot, out to 400 yards or so.

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    Default Tikka

    What caliber Tikka are you going to buy?

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    Member akprideinvegas's Avatar
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    .270 win. Cheap ammo compared to those wsm cartridges and the availability is there. Shoots a 150 grain bullet at 2600+ fps, and I don't need more than that
    NRA life Member JVJ

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    In my case? My VX3 variable power scope operates much more smoothly and the adjustment lug is much more cold hands friendly than my VXII scopes. Leupold has offered to try to loosen the VXII adjustment effort but I've never followed up.

  18. #18
    Member akprideinvegas's Avatar
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    well i got my scope in and its pretty sweet. im more than happy with the distance between the eye and scope, in my house, which is not all that bright it picks up more than enough light. the weight is super light and i could not find a comprable scope for the same price. i got it for 350$$$. the power adjustment, could probably be smoother, but i dont see why i would pay more for it. Its just gear, and you can not overthink it. Im building the lightest mountain gun i can afford, i packed a 10 pound rifle, now i will be packing a 7 pound rifle, sounds good to me. plus i have good spotting scope, binocs, and rifle scope. i know there are going to be brighter, cleaner glass, but i wanted light weight and this popped up. no one else could come up with a scope that even weighed the same. i did my research, ordered a product, and so far am very happy.
    NRA life Member JVJ

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    Default VX-II Scope adjustment

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    In my case? My VX3 variable power scope operates much more smoothly and the adjustment lug is much more cold hands friendly than my VXII scopes. Leupold has offered to try to loosen the VXII adjustment effort but I've never followed up.
    I did not know they would do that. Heck I would even pay a fee to have them do that. I don't know why they send them out like that. I have a VX-I that is real tight compared to my ancient VX-II.
    I'll give them a call tomorrow I don't really care if it take a while since Beretta has had my T-3 for six weeks and it is still waiting for the next available smith.

  20. #20

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    My mountain rifle weighs 8 1/2 lbs, the scope weighs 2 lbs, and the bipod weighs another 2 lbs. It will reach out and touch something... it gives me a lot of flexibility.

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