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Thread: How much salt for a hide?

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    Default How much salt for a hide?

    Say if I was to shoot a 7 to 8 foot griz on the first day of a week long hunting trip, how much salt would I need to keep the hide from rotting? I have only shot one and we were only a couple of hours away from a freezer. Thanks for the advice.

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    Skin it right and strech it, or at least flesh/scrape the hide clean..... keep it out of the rain and a nice breeze will help.A little tarp tent will help.... Pebbles and rocks placed along the edges of the skin keep it flat with no curled places along the skins edges that will spoil.

    I use a skin scraper simply made outta 2' diameter copper pipe and a rounded wood handle about 3 inches outta the pipe. I champher the inside of the pipe 45' and leave the outside wall straight 90'. I push off the fat and excess meats by laying the hide on my thigh while sitting in a chair.

    Ive never used salt, and the scraper and little tarp are less than a pound in weight.

    good luck.
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

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    Quote Originally Posted by strangerinastrangeland View Post
    Skin it right and strech it, or at least flesh/scrape the hide clean..... keep it out of the rain and a nice breeze will help.A little tarp tent will help.... Pebbles and rocks placed along the edges of the skin keep it flat with no curled places along the skins edges that will spoil.

    I use a skin scraper simply made outta 2' diameter copper pipe and a rounded wood handle about 3 inches outta the pipe. I champher the inside of the pipe 45' and leave the outside wall straight 90'. I push off the fat and excess meats by laying the hide on my thigh while sitting in a chair.

    Ive never used salt, and the scraper and little tarp are less than a pound in weight.

    good luck.
    Do you have a picture of your skin scraper? Sounds like it would work well.

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    Member jkb's Avatar
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    Sounds like a cool set up stranger, I used 6 one pound boxes of salt on my last bear in moose season. It was hot so I built a fleshing table out of 5 logs, 4 for legs and one to lay the hide over. Every day I would work on the hide during the heat on the day. Then sprinkle a little salt on it and wrap it back up and put it in the shade. It lasted 9 days and is hanging on my wall no worse for wear and tear.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
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    I also kept it in a garbage bag to keep it dry.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
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    Default Thanks

    Thanks for the info. Hopefully we get one or two.

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    heres what I ment about placing pebbles around the edges of the skin, to keep it flat and from curling. Its a Caribou skin, but its no different.



    The scraper is in the girls hand....not the best pict for sure, but there it is Round ended wooden handle placed in a copper pipe


    get as much flesh and fat as you can, off and salt it, you'lll be happy I figure....~~LOL!!~~
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

  8. #8

    Default If using a bag, try burlap

    Quote Originally Posted by jkb View Post
    I also kept it in a garbage bag to keep it dry.

    Some may disagree with me, but I call hide in a plastic bag a no no, keeps too much moisture and warmth, helps out bacteria. Better to hang it, or lay it skin up over some sticks and put the plastic bag or a tarp over it to keep the rain off it. Let the air take moisture out.

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    Quote Originally Posted by corbanzo View Post
    Some may disagree with me, but I call hide in a plastic bag a no no, keeps too much moisture and warmth, helps out bacteria. Better to hang it, or lay it skin up over some sticks and put the plastic bag or a tarp over it to keep the rain off it. Let the air take moisture out.
    I would avoid plastic bags at all cost, particularly with a green hide. The plastic prevents the hide from breathing, and will create a condensation problem. Use a large, heavy-duty game bag.

    In my opinion, salt is essential in preventing the hair from slipping on your bear skin. I'm generous with my salt, and will use at least 30-40 lbs. on a mature bear (around 20-plus pounds per salting). Start by completely fleshing the hide, removing all meat and fat. Split the lips, nose, and eyelids, turn the ears, toes, and tail. That usually takes me a solid four hours or more in the field, to do it correctly. Once the hide is completely fleshed, give it a thorough salting with fine mixing salt. Take care to rub the salt all the way out to the edges of the hide (hides tend to roll back on themselves and what looks like the edge often is not). Be sure to get plenty of salt in the ears, lips, nose, eyelids and toes. With the hide thoroughly salted, fold it together with the hair side out, then roll it. Let it sit overnight. The salt will draw quite a bit of moisture out of the hide in a few hours. Then unroll it, shake it out, and give it another thorough salting. Roll it again and leave it alone until you get it to your taxidermist.

    People living in Bush Alaska don't always use salt, and instead use urine, brains, smoke, etc, to tan hides. None of these methods are generally recommended for sport hunters who are simply trying to prevent the hair from slipping until they can get it out of the field and into the hands of a qualified tannery.

    Freezing a salted hide accomplishes little; just get it to a processor right away. If it's going to be a while, you can lay it out flat and let it dry. It will keep a long time that way.

    You might also check out the Wilderness Taxidermy video; it does a pretty good job of covering this and related matters.

    Hope it helps!

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
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