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Thread: Which 375 H&H?

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    Member kobuk's Avatar
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    Default Which 375 H&H?

    i am looking at getting a new rifle and always wanted a 375 H&H. does anyone have any prefferences in rifle? i sure like the looks and feel of the ruger hawkeye. looking around at rifles i noticed some of the ruger hawkeye and ruger alaskan look about the same. what is the difference between them. some hawkeye have a barrel strap for the sling and a heavy wide rubber stock and others are built a little slimmer with a synthetic stock with sling mount on the bottom of the forearm. what barrel length works best with the 375? what bullet weight for moose is the best? i use a 338 wim mag now which is plenty of power, just always wanted a 375. a guy can't have to many rifles, can he?

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    Default .375 h&h

    The Winchester Classic Stainless in .375 H&H is the top choice if you want an all weather gun. Even used they sell for a higher price than the new Rugers- there are several reasons why they demand high dollar.

    For a blued steel and walnut gun the CZ rifles are a good buy for the $$.

    Stick with the .375 H&H - ammo is easy to find and the long tapered shells feed better and more reliably than the short fat stubby rounds.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by tvfinak View Post
    The Winchester Classic Stainless in .375 H&H is the top choice if you want an all weather gun. Even used they sell for a higher price than the new Rugers- there are several reasons why they demand high dollar.

    For a blued steel and walnut gun the CZ rifles are a good buy for the $$.

    Stick with the .375 H&H - ammo is easy to find and the long tapered shells feed better and more reliably than the short fat stubby rounds.
    I'll second the above post, unless you can afford a PRE-64' M70 in .375 H&H

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    Member kobuk's Avatar
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    what are the reasons for the winchester over the rugers? i do want stainless or i would look into the cz also.

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    Because they are Winchester, and not Ruger.

    You can find the stainless model with a walnut stock, they are real pretty. Set up with a Jewell trigger, would be a very nice rifle indeed.
    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocre minds. The latter cannot understand it when a man does not thoughtlessly submit to hereditary prejudices but honestly and courageously uses his intelligence. Albert Einstein

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    The Ruger .375 feeds smooth, I have one. The H&H will have a longer barrel and more weight. The Ruger may a little harder to find ammo during hunting season but any other time you can get what you need.

    Several people make fine .375 H&H rifles if you choose that route. Even Ruger chambers a .375 H&H but it costs twice as much as their .375 Ruger variant.

    I have good results with a 270gr TSX in my .375 Ruger and a good friend has good results with a 300gr TSX in his Remington 700 .375 H&H.

    As far as short and stubby goes, I disagree. The Ruger is only .020 longer and only if you load it to max length. Both cases are .532 at the base and of course they have the same neck diameter. I feel that the Ruger ejects it's brass smoother than the Remington.

    The last two years I hunted in rain 24/7. I would stay away from wood.

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    Pick a Sako, and Sako...I'm fond of the Model 75, either in Hunter or Safari grade, while the older AV and 61R are frequently referred to as the best the maker had to offer. I really like my Model 85 (.338 WM), but recent concerns with the Beretta ownership kinda makes this a risky proposition...I haven't seen a bad one yet, but I worry they're going to do the same thing they did with Tikka...

    The CZ 550 is a great shooting rifle, which means it's not so great to carry. Mine weighs 11.5lbs (empty) with scope. This is probably why I have a 20" Sako AV with synthetic stock and an Aimpoint to carry around with me when I visit the thick stuff.

    There used to be a time when Remington and Winchester were decent dollar values, especially as compared to Sako, Browning, Kimber, etc. Nowadays, the price of anything from Remchester just doesn't justify buying it. Every Ruger I've had shot better than any of my Winchesters for less money, and Remington has pretty much sat on their laurels while ratcheting up prices and skimping on materials.

    My thoughts...your mileage may vary.

  8. #8

    Smile .375 choices...

    Get a Dakota 76 in .375. If that is to much then a pre-64 Winchester or the "Classic Stainless" from Winchester. Or the CZ .375. The older Mod. 70's had a superb trigger for a big game hunting rifle, sturdy and reliable. Stay away from enclosed triggers. They trap dirt and gum up at the worst time. Use them for small game or varmint hunting.

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Ruger #1 Tropical,Winchester mod.70 crf,CZ Interarms Mk.X

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    Remington 700 XCR. I have one and it is great. Shoots sub-moa.

    Ron

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    This is a good thread, the only consensus is on the caliber.

    I have a ZKK in .375 that I posted about in another thread. I believe the receiver was twisted when the first 'smith removed the barrel to rechamber it to .375 Weatherby. It took the skills of Jim Brockman to fix it. But something like this you shouldn't even have to think about with a new CZ, or if you can find an older model ZKK. If your wood is finished properly, rain won't bother it, but it must be finished properly.

    Whatever you get, for minimal $$ you can have the 'smith of your choice massage the rifle to make everything smoooootttthhhh and reliable, then you'll love it forever. The H&H doesn't have the recoil you might think, a big slow push.
    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocre minds. The latter cannot understand it when a man does not thoughtlessly submit to hereditary prejudices but honestly and courageously uses his intelligence. Albert Einstein

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    Don't know if I can help...how much you willing to spend? Push-feed, Sako is the best....for a seriously DG rifle I would opt for a controlled fed design like a custom Mauser or a pre-64 or the newer pre-64. Bullet weight choice for our animals in our state the 270 grain is tough to beat.

    I'm considering one too, with a couple of 338 win mags in the home a Sako and a Pre-64 and my new equal too the .375 HH a 9.3x64....strong consideration for my build is on a Rem. 30 action sitting with nothing better to do other than being a paper weight.

    I like the design of the round an true for the need of a belt...it is a very good choice in your next selection. Holland & Holland.....sounds nice!

    Let us know what you chose.

    regards,

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    Member c04hoosier's Avatar
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    Default Just to clarify...

    The Ruger Hawkeye is NOT a .375 H&H. It is a .375 Ruger. Similar ballistics, but different shell. I bought one of the .375 Rugers, but it turned out to be a lemon. I've never heard of any other problems, though, so take that for what you wish.

    Out of the current stainless/synthetic .375 H&H models, I might lean toward a Browning A Bolt if price was a factor. If price is not a factor, I'd probably get a Weatherby Dangerous Game Rifle. I just like Weatherby's. They are not true stainless steel, but are coated to prevent rust.

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    Premium Member MarineHawk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by c04hoosier View Post
    The Ruger Hawkeye is NOT a .375 H&H. It is a .375 Ruger. Similar ballistics, but different shell. I bought one of the .375 Rugers, but it turned out to be a lemon. I've never heard of any other problems, though, so take that for what you wish.

    Out of the current stainless/synthetic .375 H&H models, I might lean toward a Browning A Bolt if price was a factor. If price is not a factor, I'd probably get a Weatherby Dangerous Game Rifle. I just like Weatherby's. They are not true stainless steel, but are coated to prevent rust.
    Mmm, Wby 378. That's what I would get. Still drooling over my Mk V Accumark in .340 I had for about 6 months.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarineHawk View Post
    Mmm, Wby 378. That's what I would get. Still drooling over my Mk V Accumark in .340 I had for about 6 months.
    The 378 Wby is just a little more rifle than most want to take on.

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    I've owned numerous 375 H&H's over the years to include Remington, Winchester 70 and a Dakota and still own the Dakota.

    Sorry guys, but I like my Ruger stainless .375 Alaskan better than any H&H I ever owned. Finding ammo is a non issue, if you can remember to bring the rifle you can bring the ammo with you. If you forget the ammo then maybe you better pick another sport
    Tennessee

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    Premium Member MarineHawk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeJ View Post
    The 378 Wby is just a little more rifle than most want to take on.
    Me too, just fantasizing. That's why I got the .340. But after I did, I was all psyched out about the brutal recoil before I first shot it. Turned out not to be too bad (with a shoulder-mounted recoil pad). But, I assume the .378 might be fairly nasty, and I'm not going to use a brake.

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    Default .378

    I picked up an early German Weatherby .378 MKV at an auction about 20 years ago and probably haven't shot it more than a few boxs. The recoil is horrible - after a few rounds you feel like you are "punch drunk". On the other hand I've practiced rapid firing my .375 H&H - there is that much difference in the felt recoil.

    Other people I've talked to have the same perception I have- and some of them routinely fire large bore rifles.


    Quote Originally Posted by MarineHawk View Post
    Me too, just fantasizing. That's why I got the .340. But after I did, I was all psyched out about the brutal recoil before I first shot it. Turned out not to be too bad (with a shoulder-mounted recoil pad). But, I assume the .378 might be fairly nasty, and I'm not going to use a brake.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

  19. #19

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    I own the Remington Classic SS. I believe it was made only in 1996. It has been flawless in every way except the bolt opens while hiking with a pack and carrying it on my left shoulder. As for being a push feed, the odds are you are more likely to lose your life driving to your hunting area then having a failure with that type of action by far. At about 9 lbs with scope it's a pleasure to carry and dosen't seem to kick much. It has weathered some nasty hunting trips without failure.

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    Member c04hoosier's Avatar
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    Default push feed vs. controlled round feed...

    I think this is a non-issue as well, especially since the Ruger CRF I bought didn't feed right. However, the thing I worry about with the Remingtons is the extractor. I also don't like how you can't lock the bolt closed. Don't have to worry about either of those on the Weatherby. But I will NOT buy a .378 Wby. Probably a .375 Wby--that way I could shoot the H&H rounds also, in case I do happen to forget the ammo

    And when is Winchester going to re-introduce the Model 70 in .375? I kick myself because I almost bought one for $800 the year before they stopped making them. Figured I had time...

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