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Thread: Condition of the fish at Sweetheart Creek?

  1. #1

    Default Condition of the fish at Sweetheart Creek?

    I am heading up to Sweetheart for some reds on Mon. Just wondering if anyone had been there in the last week and if the fish were still looking good and silver. The only thing I have heard is that there a ton of pinks to wade through. Not a problem being that we will be spearfishing.

  2. #2
    Member L. G.'s Avatar
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    . . . and???

    How about a report?

    Seemed like it was a weak run both a Sweetheart and the Snett hatchery.

  3. #3

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    Well we couldn't have asked for a better day to go. Water was flat calm all the way out there and the sun popped out by 7am. We were a bit worried when we first got there because the entire lower pool was filled with gross dying dicolored pinks. Even if there were a few good fish in there, you would be hard pressed to ever see them in the school. We hit pay dirt at the top pool though. We threw on our gear and jumped it to see big schools of reds. We had me and my buddy with spearguns and his dad and dad's friend on the bank cleaning. Took us about an hour to get the hang of the currents and the behavior of the fish. Once we got going though we were shooting a first about every 2-3 minutes. They had started to turn some but with spear guns we could pick and choose what we wanted. I would say about 40-50% were still looking pretty nice. We got our limit of 50 (dad and friend weren't residents) in about 3 hours. Best day of fishing in Alaska yet. By the way, if you get the chance, you should really try to get a mast and at least stick your face in the water where it's clear to check it out. It's pretty **** deep and pretty cool looking under there. The raging current you see on the top doesn't exist about 10-20ft down on the bottom. We would catch our breath at the surface near the current. Then we would dive down and out into the center of the stream, shoot a fish, then head back over to the calm section. Once we got the hang of it it was almost like riding a carousel.

  4. #4
    Member greythorn3's Avatar
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    Now that sounds exciting!
    Semper Fi!

  5. #5

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    It was a hell of alot better than trying to fight the current at the bottom pool like we did the first trip. We were the only ones out there besides the local sow and her three cubs. Sooooo relaxing.

  6. #6
    Member Sobie2's Avatar
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    I went up on August 22 and there wasn't anybody there... but a lot of pinks. Got my 25, but had to work hard. I too went up to the uppermost pool to look the the sockeye were in there. But using a cast net or dipnet those fish were unreachable. When spooked they would crowd into the middle and were unreachable. Lots of big ones though you could see them.

    SemperFi, how did you get those fish back down? Did you do it the hard way or have some inventive way to float them down?

    Sobie2

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sobie2 View Post
    I went up on August 22 and there wasn't anybody there... but a lot of pinks. Got my 25, but had to work hard. I too went up to the uppermost pool to look the the sockeye were in there. But using a cast net or dipnet those fish were unreachable. When spooked they would crowd into the middle and were unreachable. Lots of big ones though you could see them.

    SemperFi, how did you get those fish back down? Did you do it the hard way or have some inventive way to float them down?

    Sobie2
    If you could get a look-see under the water and bubbles you would be surprised where they hang out. There is a spot that, if you had a fairly heavy cast net, you could throw it out into the current and basically be guarenteed a handful of fish each cast.

    As far as getting them down, we filled two dry bags with the fish, left some air in them, and then just let them go over the falls with one of us waiting at the bottom to stop them. Worked like a charm. The bags were so heavy that none of us could lift the heavier one by ourselves.

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