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Thread: Need a little assistance

  1. #1

    Default Need a little assistance

    My 2 yr old Black lab is a great duck getter.

    There are only a few issues that I still need to work on AND I need help to do them, because I am not sure how to fix it.

    #1. At home , during training, my dog will sit perfectly at my side and wait for my command to fetch. He would rather die before leaving my side, after I give him the command. BUT, here is the issue. When we are out in the field, sitting there patiently waiting for the ducks to fly by. As soon as I stand up to take my shots, my dog is already running out into the pond, bounding like a deer through the woods. Needless to say, he will stop about 30 ft away and be looking around frantically, wondering why we are so excited, and not knowing where the duck just dropped at. What can I do to stop him from running when I stand up?

    #2. At home, I mix up the distances that I throw his bumper, as much as i can. But I can never get more then 40-50 yards or so. Well, that transfers out to the field. And if I 'wound' a duck and he glides longer then 40 yards, my dog has a tough time finding him. The only way he will find him, is if I walk closer to the duck. If the duck is within 40-50 yards, my dog will find him. Any ideas?

    Mainly, if I could fix my #1, I think it would help a lot with my #2. I could live with #2 if I knew how to fix #1.

    Thanks for the help!
    Fear Nothing, Do Everything!

  2. #2
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    I had a Chessie that would break early too. Never fully got him to hold 100% of the time, but you might try tying him off in the blind on a correction collar, or use a shock collar in the field.

    Cabela's sells a dog slinshot that can chuck a bumber out to 70 yards or so. Scent one up and sling it blind, try it on land first, get him to trut you on the command to "keep goin"

    Good luck, nothin' like a great water dog.

  3. #3
    Member rugersbro's Avatar
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    Default Shock collar

    I have 2 shock collars http://www.tritronics.com/remotetrai...ortseries.html

    That I will let go for $100.

    PM me. If interested.

  4. #4

    Default

    The training that you have accomplished at home in your yard needs to be carried over to the field. Your yard is a place of control and your dog knows it. So your training lessons need to be done in your hunting environment as well.
    Trying to teach your dog during the hunt is most frustrating. So some preseason lessons need to be done. Conditioning the dog to all the sights and sounds. You may want to go out and setup your blind and decoys before opener. Hold a broomstick to point at the birds as they fly over to get the reaction from the dog as if you were going to shoot them. Make your needed correction at that time. Maybe have a training buddy along to help.

    Retrieving distance. Your dog has learned how far you can throw. He will only go out that far because that is what he is again "conditioned" to.
    Your training partner can help with this as well. Start short and gradually extend your dogs retrieving distance. Have your helper throw your bumper where he is successful and then you start moving farther away. Maybe ten yards or so at a time. The thrower stays in the same location.

    Let me know how it goes.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by WildManWiles View Post
    My 2 yr old Black lab is a great duck getter.

    There are only a few issues that I still need to work on AND I need help to do them, because I am not sure how to fix it.

    #1. At home , during training, my dog will sit perfectly at my side and wait for my command to fetch. He would rather die before leaving my side, after I give him the command. BUT, here is the issue. When we are out in the field, sitting there patiently waiting for the ducks to fly by. As soon as I stand up to take my shots, my dog is already running out into the pond, bounding like a deer through the woods. Needless to say, he will stop about 30 ft away and be looking around frantically, wondering why we are so excited, and not knowing where the duck just dropped at. What can I do to stop him from running when I stand up?

    #2. At home, I mix up the distances that I throw his bumper, as much as i can. But I can never get more then 40-50 yards or so. Well, that transfers out to the field. And if I 'wound' a duck and he glides longer then 40 yards, my dog has a tough time finding him. The only way he will find him, is if I walk closer to the duck. If the duck is within 40-50 yards, my dog will find him. Any ideas?

    Mainly, if I could fix my #1, I think it would help a lot with my #2. I could live with #2 if I knew how to fix #1.

    Thanks for the help!

    Definitely get a training partner to help you throw. During training, I never throw anything from my hip. You will have much more control if you have someone dressed in white (while training) and making noise while throwing the bumper. You will be able to concentrate on your dog rather than throwing bumpers and your dog will learn to look out in the field. Also, the " thrower" will be able to assist your dog on occasion out in the field.

    An E-collar is a great idea only if you know what you are doing with it. You can easily ruin the drive in your dog if not careful with one. I will even use it while hunting during training.

    Running "T patterns" with your dog while at home will help with control and that will transfer to line control as well.

    As for breaking, I had a hard breaker once. I started with a sturdy rope tied to the ball-hitch of my truck, he broke a few times. I then reinforced this same training with an e-collar.

    Good luck and happy hunting

  6. #6
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    Default

    #1- Quit acting in a manner that encourages him to break. If you don't want to correct him, then if he does break, don't shoot, sit down, and be quiet. Just hope that he comes back looking for some positive reinforcement. Ignore him, make him sit/stay, and start again. That is a long process.
    I train much more directly, and am willing to correct hard and fast to get the point across. Here are some other ideas:
    A- Adjust your training to be more in line with what you are doing while hunting. It all goes much easier if you use a check cord tied to your belt or as said before, to something solid. If he breaks and gets checked, you still correct and enforce the action. He does NOT get to retrieve. Plan on putting some rocks in your pockets in case you have to pick up birds later.
    B- Shoot to miss. Easy for me, I miss most of the time. If he breaks on a miss, there is nothing to pick up, and correcting him does not stop the hunt.
    C- Shoot several birds before you let him retrieve. Don't let him go every time. I hunted with guys that don't let their dogs work until the shoot is completed. Then the dogs are released to get everything laying there. If you try this, be sure you kill the cripples so they don't wander off.

    #2- You can extend the dogs marking by yourself. It is not easy, but not impossible. Go to a flat area. At the far end, set up a chair and bucket of bumpers on the chair. Set the dog down away from the chair, walk up to the chair, throw the bumper, walk back, and send the dog. You get several positives from this.
    A- Dog learns to be steady.
    B- Dog learns memory.
    C- Dog learns to run longer marks.
    You can also do multiple marks using this method. Just run them as back to back singles before you try doubles or triples.

    As for #1 fixing #2, nope. 2 different issues. Certainly a dog breaking can't or normally won't mark as well as a steady dog, but that is not the problem you have currently. You have a dog that is not steady, and you have a dog that can't run long marks not because he can't mark, but because you have not trained him to go long distance.

    You are not seeing anything lots of other people have not had problems with. A training partner can help for sure, but you can work on both of these for now on your own. Just get creative.

    Keep asking questions. If I or anybody else lost you, ask again. Good luck, and have fun.

  7. #7
    Member rugersbro's Avatar
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    Default pm sent

    Hi,
    Sent you a PM

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by rugersbro View Post
    Hi,
    Sent you a PM

    Never got a PM.
    Fear Nothing, Do Everything!

  9. #9
    Member rugersbro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WildManWiles View Post
    Never got a PM.

    Sorry, I guess it was AK River Rat that was interested.

    Thanks

  10. #10
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    Default Take your time

    WMW, keep in mind that breaking bad habits is harder to do than building good habits. You'll need to remember that he will always think about breaking. That's ok. He has a desire to retrieve, and that is what we want. You just need to control how he does it.
    River Oaks Corky was a barker. Always. The owners campaigned him, and as history showed, he won National events. But he barked. So they worked on it over and over and over. The command "QUIET" was given each and every time he retrieved to reinforce his training. He finally learned to yield to the temptation to bark.
    That was until he was much older. They decided to run him again just for fun. You know, bring out the Old Man for another go at it. Yep, they forgot to tell him "quiet", and at roughly 12 years of age he barked his fool head off.
    Let us know how the training is going, and best of luck to you and your dog.
    ARR

  11. #11
    Member KUMA's Avatar
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    Default

    #1 Back tie your dog. Lots of obedience training with the stay command, use your imagination. refer to Wetland Retrievers...good info!
    #2 get a dummy launcher.

    Simple to complex......Patentice

  12. #12

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    For retreivers that aren't rock solid on obedience........
    When I go out with first season retrievers I take along a place board.
    It is simply an oval piece of plywood with an eye bolt mounted in the center. You may need to vary the size depending on how big your dog is. The idea is to have the dog secured and standing on the board with all 4 feet. The dog can't move because the dog is held in place by its own body weight. I use a segment of chain with a snap to go through the dogs collar. Long enough for the dog to sit comfortably. You can shoot with out your dog breaking. You can simply unsnap your dog and send them out for the retrieve when you are ready. This also keeps your hunting buddies from getting all pissed off at you because your dog breaks every time a bird starts to set or someone picks up a shotgun.

    Here again...... it would be nice to have your dog use to this apparatus before the hunt.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wetland Retrievers View Post
    For retreivers that aren't rock solid on obedience........
    When I go out with first season retrievers I take along a place board.
    It is simply an oval piece of plywood with an eye bolt mounted in the center. You may need to vary the size depending on how big your dog is. The idea is to have the dog secured and standing on the board with all 4 feet. The dog can't move because the dog is held in place by its own body weight. I use a segment of chain with a snap to go through the dogs collar. Long enough for the dog to sit comfortably. You can shoot with out your dog breaking. You can simply unsnap your dog and send them out for the retrieve when you are ready. This also keeps your hunting buddies from getting all pissed off at you because your dog breaks every time a bird starts to set or someone picks up a shotgun.

    Here again...... it would be nice to have your dog use to this apparatus before the hunt.
    I hear that. Chuck and I did the same thing, but used a pallet, with a plywood cover. We havent used it in a long time, guess we will get back on it.
    Fear Nothing, Do Everything!

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