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Thread: How to judge moose antler size?

  1. #1
    New member Sockeye Salm's Avatar
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    Default How to judge moose antler size?

    I wonder if some of you guys would share your methods of judging weather a moose will go 50" or not. I did a search on this but didn't have any luck.

    Thanks

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    Member cjustinm's Avatar
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    I'm very new to this but i did find some material on this so please somebody tell me if this is wrong. I read that on a bull in alaska, canadian and shiras moose being different that the tip of the ear to the tip of the other ear spread is about 30 inches if the ears are straight out. This being the case an ear is about 10 inches long (hope this is right) so if you are looking straight at a bull and there is an extra ear length past the tip of each ear it should be about 50 inches if you have an extra ear and a half your closer to 60in. Also i read that the distance between the burrs or bases of the horns are 7.5-8 inches so you could do the math from there but that sounds pretty difficult. Anyways hope I'm helping, anyone please correct me if this is innaccurate info I read.

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    Member Marc Taylor's Avatar
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    I like 10 inches from outside eye to outside eye. Then if you can double that on each side AND, !AND! have more antler beyond, he's 50+.

    Get the video from Fish and Game. It's very informative.

    Taylor

  4. #4
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Check out the video streaming online! http://www.multimedia.adfg.alaska.go...mooselegal.wmv

    You will need windows media player. The method Marc uses is the one reccommended by ADF&G.

  5. #5
    New member Sockeye Salm's Avatar
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    Default Good link

    Thanks Lu John for the excellent link. Good stuff. I'm heading out Sat. the 29th to scout and get one tied down for the opener on Tues. the 1st. Man am I pumped!!!

  6. #6
    Member tccak71's Avatar
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    50 inchers tend to have flat beams and then turn up before the palm. If the beams are V'd it most likely isn't 50". I never got a handle on the ear to ear of measurement between the ear thing.

    Tim

  7. #7

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    I use 10" eye to eye as well, and generally about 24" ear tip to ear tip.I have'nt had any difficulty with a rack 55" or greater, they are VERY obvious to me. The ones "around" 50" can be really tough thus the reason I let 7 different bulls walk one particular season.

    If it looks to be carrying around two sheets of plywood it's gimmie .

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sockeye Salm View Post
    I wonder if some of you guys would share your methods of judging weather a moose will go 50" or not. I did a search on this but didn't have any luck.

    Thanks
    We give 30" to the ears (ears 12 each and 6 Usually closer to 7 between the burrs). Eyes are good - we just don't use them.
    Regardless of what "gauge" is used GIVE YOUR SELF SOME WIGGLE ROOM.
    If the width requirement is 50" set your standard at 55" or at least enough to cover your margin of error (we ALL have one).
    Good luck
    Joe (Ak)

  9. #9

    Default careful

    I watched the ADF&G video, I think it is called Is This Bull Legal. I learned alot and used it on my hunt last year. If I remember right, they are $15 at ADF&G. I was fortunate to have the bull I shot looking at me. I used the crosshairs in my scope to measure the distance between the eyes (10") and then used that section of crosshairs that covered the 10" to measure the spread. I measured 50". I was not going to shoot based on the measurment as it was too close but he had four browtines on one side so I did. He measured 49 3/8 with a tape.

  10. #10
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    Default can you send me a picture of the rack please so i can use it as a reference?

    Quote Originally Posted by akrider View Post
    I watched the ADF&G video, I think it is called Is This Bull Legal. I learned alot and used it on my hunt last year. If I remember right, they are $15 at ADF&G. I was fortunate to have the bull I shot looking at me. I used the crosshairs in my scope to measure the distance between the eyes (10") and then used that section of crosshairs that covered the 10" to measure the spread. I measured 50". I was not going to shoot based on the measurment as it was too close but he had four browtines on one side so I did. He measured 49 3/8 with a tape.
    Can you send me a pic so i can use it as a reference please?

  11. #11
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    I use a rangefinder and the mil-dots on my scope to measure 50 inches.

    On the stock of my gun I have tapped a table which has the number of mil dots for 50 inches at ranges from 100 - 1000 yards (in 50 yard increments). I simply range the animal then look at the table to find the necessary number of mil-dots to equal 50 inches. The sweet spot is 150 yards. At this range you need 9.26 mil dots to make 50 inches. My scope has 10 mil-dots from left to right which means if he touches the outer bars on my cross-hairs he is legal. (at 150 yards each mil dot is 5.4 inches, so a 10 mil-dot moose is 54 inches). Once you start to get out past 400 yards each mil-dot is equivalent to 14.4 inches, so you are talking only a fraction of a mil-dot to differentiate a legal from non-legal moose. But at least it will give you an idea of how big he is, and weather or not he is worth putting a stalk on.

    We have also taken pictures of moose through our spotting scope, and used the "10 inches between the eyes" method to estimate size. A pen and a piece of paper makes this method easier to mark the space between the eyes.

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