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Thread: Ultimate Survival Wetfire Stove

  1. #1
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    Default Ultimate Survival Wetfire Stove

    Does anybody have experience using the Wetfire Stove and fuel?
    http://www.basegear.com/ultimate-sur...ire-stove.html

    It seems pretty light, and am wondering about keeping it in a day pack for emergencies or day trips to heat water for soup when we dont' get back to base camp.

    Once you light the fuel, can you put it out to save it for later?
    How much water will one block of fuel heat up? (Ambient temp 40 degrees or so)
    Thanks folks,
    ARR

  2. #2
    Member Chisana's Avatar
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    Looks sort of like a military stove that uses trioxene tabs. I've wanted to try one, but never got around to it. I think they are good for heating up a canteen cup of water, but not much else. They are inexpensive and might be worth throwing in a pack.

  3. #3
    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    I have actually used the trioxene tabs to heat water in a canteen cup - for Mountain House on a sort of "light and fast" one or two day exploration of unknown drainages in the past - works but pretty Spartan.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by shphtr View Post
    I have actually used the trioxene tabs to heat water in a canteen cup - for Mountain House on a sort of "light and fast" one or two day exploration of unknown drainages in the past - works but pretty Spartan.
    I carry a tioxene stove as a backup sometimes as well as carry the tioxene tabs all the time. The tabs burn for a LONG time and even long enough to dry out damp twigs in order to get a little fire going. The tabs light relatively easy and you'll always find them in my hunting packs they are just too light and handy NOT to take along.

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    I have used both the Ultimate Survival wet fire, and the trioxene tablets. Both work about the same. Good survival idea, but not very practical for most hunting situations. it takes a while for it to heat up water, and if you don't have a good wind screen it may never really get your water very hot. Very cool survival idea. great for starting fires with damp or wet tinder.

  6. #6
    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska_Lanche View Post
    I carry a tioxene stove as a backup sometimes as well as carry the tioxene tabs all the time. The tabs burn for a LONG time and even long enough to dry out damp twigs in order to get a little fire going. The tabs light relatively easy and you'll always find them in my hunting packs they are just too light and handy NOT to take along.
    I never go anywhere without those tabs in my kit, weigh next to nothing and will start a fire in wind or rain.

  7. #7

    Default Esbit Stove

    I'm not familiar with the Wetfire Stove but it sounds similar to the Esbit Stove which uses fuel tablets that can be blown out and reused later.

    http://www.rei.com/search?query=Esbit+Stove

    I carry the Esbit Pocket stove in my pack at all times.

    Best Regards

  8. #8
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    I've used Esbit pocket stoves for years. I keep one in the day pack, in each snogo, survival gear, etc. The stove folds up to about the size of a deck of cards and holds three sealed tablets inside. Pretty darned handy. And cheap.

  9. #9
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    The wet fire stuff is the best thing since sliced bread if you ask me. I use it often. Bought three more packs just the other day from the Campmor website. They have the plastic tubes of 8 pieces for around $6. Great firestarter, no question about it. Small, light, waterproof, burns like hell, what more could you want. As for the stove usage, couldn't say. But guess it would take awhile to boil anything.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  10. #10
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    We just started testing them at Backpackgeartest.org. You can read the Initial Reports here http://www.backpackgeartest.org/mfr_...20Technologies

    Jason B

  11. #11

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    +1 for esbit fuel cubes. They work well for day hikes when you don't want to take a fuel or canister stove. I didn't bother buying a stove for these though, this is what I did for an ultralight and cheap setup.

    Get a small tin can like canned mushrooms come in, they are maybe a 1/3rd the size of a can of soda. Eat the mushrooms, rinse the can, and poke a bunch of holes in the sides of the can for air flow, especially in the bottom part of the side of the can. This is your stove.

    Put a fuel cube in it, light it, and put your pot of water on top. You can also use an aluminum pop can, another tin can, or whatever as your pot. Works great to heat up water for a mountain house, packages of soup, tea, or whatever. Total cost, around $2 plus fuel cubes.

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