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Thread: The Iron Door, Resurrection Bay

  1. #1

    Default The Iron Door, Resurrection Bay

    Anyone know the history behind the Iron Door south of Thumb Cove in Resurrection Bay? An old mine I would guess.....

    Nozzlehog

  2. #2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nozzlehog View Post
    Anyone know the history behind the Iron Door south of Thumb Cove in Resurrection Bay? An old mine I would guess.....

    Nozzlehog
    No--not a mine. It's WWII related--I think it might have been one end of a submarine net they could deploy to protect the bay if subs were sighted. Not 100% sure, though...but it seems like I heard that once.

  3. #3
    Member Alaskanmutt's Avatar
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    Default WWII Gunn Emplacements

    and ammo storage


    Quote Originally Posted by akpfeiff View Post
    No--not a mine. It's WWII related--I think it might have been one end of a submarine net they could deploy to protect the bay if subs were sighted. Not 100% sure, though...but it seems like I heard that once.

  4. #4

    Default Submarine Warning Cable?

    Nice information - Thanks! It makes more sense on the submarine idea than ammo bunkers based on the location down at waterline. I found one report that follows below referencing a"submarine sensing cable", but nothing on submarine nets in Seward. Anyone heard about those?

    During World War II, an Army garrison was stationed in Seward to protect the transportation interests there. Numerous outposts, bunkers, and artillery batteries were constructed around the bay, and a special submarine sensing cable was strung under the waters of the bay. Although the submarine warning system was activated one night, historians still debate whether any Japanese submarines ever did enter Resurrection Bay during the war.

  5. #5

    Default

    Well, now that you mention it, I think I heard it was a cable and not a net.....

  6. #6
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    Default

    Here is the story on the Iron dorrs and other installations around Res Bay
    http://www.sdphotos.org/ca/seward/index.html

  7. #7
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    Default

    The Iron Doors / Topeka Point searchlight
    http://www.sdphotos.org/ca/seward/topeka/sl.html

  8. #8
    Member FishSean's Avatar
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    Default >>>--------->

    It is there to retain the dreaded Kracken!

  9. #9
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Default

    Are we talking about Fort McGilvray?

    http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/units/caineshd.htm

    Here's a geocaching page on the site (there's a cache hidden nearby)...
    http://www.geocaching.com/seek/cache...d-36f0a8939c40
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  10. #10

    Default Search Lights & Gun Bunkers

    The fort is on the right going out, the shaft there does all the way to the bay in back and during WW-2 housed 1500 folks.
    I have been into the Iron doors on the left going out, and looks like there was mounting for a gun or maybe just a light ? Then on the left enterance to Day Harbor the big rock there was and still is a bunker on top, it's said to still have the gun in it. There are a few other bunkers out there, Montigue Island, Fox Island all to protect the deep water port.
    Those people had to of had a hard life and for the USA's protection

  11. #11

    Default Iron Doors = Topeka Point Searchlight #3

    Thanks everyone, especially Seward resident akpolaris! See post number 7, the link clearly explains and shows that the "Iron Doors" are actually the Topeka Point Searchlight # 3 site.

    This is located on the East side of the Bay 1/2 a mile or so south of Thumb Cove, not on the Army Dock, Derby Cove, Fort McGilvray, Caines Head side of the Bay.

    The links also explains in detail about the submarine detection cable (which evedently is not the Iron Doors site):
    In 1942 the Navy installed a magnetic anti-submarine detection loop reaching across Resurrection Bay from Rocky Point to the eastern shore near Hat Island. Vessels passing over the loop would cause detectable changes in the magnetic field surrounding the loop, alerting personnel at the receiving station.

    The shore facilities for the loop were located just north of Rocky Point and included a receiving station and two power houses. All three buildings were of wood frame construction.

    Thanks again everyone! That was very interesting!
    Nozzlehog Pete

  12. #12

    Thumbs up

    There are more old Magazines out above the old dump site. To the NW of town. Quite impressive amount of concrete and steel.
    "96% of all Internet Quotes are suspect and the remaining 4% are fiction."
    ~~Abraham Lincoln~~

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