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Thread: needing a new pup

  1. #1
    Member honker's Avatar
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    Default needing a new pup

    being on social security and not having a good job really sucks. I can't even pay for a postage stamp until the 28th. I've owned 2 labs over the years and the most i've paid was 300.00 13 yrs ago. i could buy a lab in oct. but was wondering if anyone has ever got a purebread from a shelter and the dog worked out good for ducks? I would welcome the thought of rescuing a purebread lab from a shelter but I don't think they come around that often. I'm looking for a female lab at 7 weeks.

    hunting and bonding is important and when i bought my 7 week old from a trainer in calif years ago and when she was 6 months she was sitting, laying down at the blind and retrieving pintails 150 yds away from me. She turned out to be a great companion and hunting dog for me. i have communication with my dogs, but can't see paying 700 friggen $$$.$$$ for a dog when most labs will do it if you train them and be a good owner. If anyone hears of a lab pup for sale at a reasonable i would appreciate a heads up. My preference is a black female, or choc. only. Ask for Dan 741-1880 thanks.

  2. #2

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    Some of the best retrievers I have had for both ducks and grouse have actually been crosses, like golden retriever with springer spaniels, labs with springers and you can get them at the pound as long as you spend some time looking. My last dog was one of the best retrievers I have ever had, and I have had 4 pure labs and they could not touch him, and it was a cross. Just my opinion.

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    Member honker's Avatar
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    cool, thanks for the info. i never considered goldens because im partial to short hair coated dogs. they are all worthy of consideration especially them chessies.

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    Default labradoodles?????

    I have heard Labradoodles are the new "cool" dog to have. I have seen advertisements posted for them around at pretty good prices. I think the fad is ridiculous but poodles as well as labs are proven retrievers and hunting dogs. I cant help but think the cross could produce a great retriever. Maybe try your luck in that department.
    "A dog has no use for fancy cars or big homes or designer clothes. Status symbol means nothing to him. A waterlogged stick will do just fine." Marley and Me

  5. #5

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    Funny you should ask........not a pup though.

    I just brought in a yellow male just under two years of age. The owners are looking to place him. I typically work with them for several weeks before I make them available.
    He has an athletic build. About 70 lbs. So far ....good with other dogs. Good with obedience, but needs tuning. Seems to have a soft deamnor, submits to authority.
    Haven't gotten to retrieving with him yet. Wanted to make sure he comes when called before I start any retrieving.
    If any one is interested... let me know. It will be about a month before he is ready. He is already neutered and will be current on shots.

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    Member honker's Avatar
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    just a short 13 yrs ago i paid only 300.00 for my pup from a very disguinguished, reputable trainer. so tell me, i would love to know why a dogs now are trying to be sold for what? 700.00 nobody can tell me that the costs of taking care of a pup has gone up 70% from 1996. the costs at vets haven't gone up 70%. inflation goes sky high, wages drop. from 300.00 to 700.00 somebody's getting rich selling these dogs and it sure isn't me.

    i remember when started dogs with basic training came to 700.00 no way has a trainers expenses warrant the need to up prices 70%.

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    Member Huntress's Avatar
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    Actually Honker, this is where you are wrong. Food and supplies have gone up considerably since 1996. Do I also need to remind you that shipping these items has also increased?
    1-1-96 the average for a gallon of gas was $1.27.

    If someone has bred a litter and "gets rich" they aren't doing it right. If done right you'll be lucky if you break even with that litter after all is said and done.
    Here is a very conservative look at what it takes to raise a litter.

    http://members.tripod.com/~Marge_S_2/nonframes/Costs.htm

    Think about it, breeding is a lot different than it used to be. Now a days more and more breeders are making health clearances (Hips, elbows, eyes, heart, etc...) mandatory within their breeding programs. This is something that was not talked about much back then. When it comes right down to it, the costs of raising a litter (what I would consider the "right way") are sky rocketing and changing ever year. I remember getting shots at the vet's office for $40 including the routine health check up, Now I'm lucky to walk out without paying more than I would have if it had been me going to the Doctor and walking out with nothing but a dry pocketbook.
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    I agree with huntress,

    My (cute big reg. choc.) had a ear problem, and asked what the bill was going to be, was told no more than $250.00. When I picked him up it was over $600.00

    He is about 150-160lbs, no its not all fat, but they charged me by the pound because of the meds that they had to give him, so they say. They did a test I did'nt ask for and sent me pills for him he did'nt need.

    As you can tell I'm not to happy with the vet here.

    The point being the vets will take you just like a doctor will.

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    Member honker's Avatar
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    sure the vets will charge you like a human sometimes but there is no way a puppy should cost 700.00 we're talking the breeder or trainer usually buys the medicine for first shots in bulk and gives the shot themselves. they cut the dew claws, it's a no brainer! Huntress you can pay 700.00 for a hunting dog all you want. i won't. like i said, inflation hasn't gone up enough to amount to charging 700.00 for a pup dog. you disagree then your saying the costs of a puppy when food, shots and dewclaws and hips and eyes guarantee went up 40%? i don't think so. And, which was standard far before 1996 so don't tell me those issues wern't discussed They were. break even? more like get rid of 2 litters and there's 10 grand. a pretty good start for a new G3 with yamaha and trailer. Nobody in their right mind would go through the process of breeding dogs if they couldn't make good money from it

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    Member Huntress's Avatar
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    I hate to inform you Honker, but my last TWO dogs, were well OVER $1500 each (+shipping, health cert etc). So....as far as Im concerned $700 is a "pet" price. Sure, you can find cheaper from someone who hasn't put the time or energy into their breeding program. I can tell you right now I'm not just shooting from the hip when I say raising a litter is not a money making venture when "done right". Reputable breeders do not breed for money, in fact the ones I know have all been told they are out of their mind, I'll be out of my mind when I have my second litter in 15 years next spring. But I do it for the love of the breed, the betterment of the breed, and to keep something for ourselves to continue on with.
    You can find $200 bird dogs all day long on craigs list, but I guarantee you that there has not been the time, money, sweat and tears put into those pups as someone who charges $700 and there are those who don't put anything into their dogs and still charge $700, its up to you to do your homework and find a breeder who has the breed in their best interest and not their pocketbook.

    PS. I didn't say they didn't do health clearances back then, they were not as common.
    "In the interest of protecting my privacy I will no longer be accepting Private Messages generated from this site and if you email me, it better be good!"

  11. #11

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    During 13 yrs a lot has changed. A lot of it to the better of the breed.
    Nowadays there is a lot of information to acquire on your breeding stock. There are numerous things to check for before a breeding pair should ever be put together. Hips, elbows, eyes, even muscular and spinal disorders. All that can be tested for. All of these are hereditary in nature and can be passed along from one generation to the next. What most folks don't understand is that just because your beloved pet seems normal. Doesn't mean that your pet isn't a gene carrier of potential hereditary issues. When your buddies dog down the street might seem like a good match to your female......he too actually is a carrier of one of the genes mentioned. When two carriers are bred you have a very good chance of having puppies that are affected. All this appears innocent but there are underlying genetics at work. It is up to us to ensure what we are producing for the betterment of the breed.
    NOW.....back to cost. All these test have a cost to them. Some relatively low. Others....well I recall one that cost $180 plus the vet expense to draw the blood. A "REPUTABLE" breeder that has done their homework to know what they are producing,... doesn't do it for the money. They do it because they love the breed.
    A lot of hard work goes into all the genetic test. Folks that care about the breed also make sure their stock meets a standard. There are also all the working titles, show titles and field titles. All these titles are also for the betterment of the breed. Because these "lines" have been proven to meet a breed standard .
    I myself run retrievers for field titles. I can tell you first hand that owners and trainers put a lot of effort and money into these dogs.
    AND...... "NO !!!" I wouldn't expect anyone who has done all the work mentioned above to give a pup up for a low price.

    I'm not saying that good dogs don't come out of $300 puppies or even free. But you are getting a crap shoot on what you will wound up with in ability and genetics.
    I too have seen this first hand. Clients have dropped of young retrievers for training. About two months into training I start to notice that the pup is getting lame. So I send the pup with the owner to the vet where the pup is diagnosed with elbow dysplacia. I also have seen EIC more times than I care to see.. where the retriever will loose control over its hind quarters for a short period. Very dramatic.
    Statistically from what I have seen from a trainers perspective. Well bred dogs from reputable kennels or breeders have tended to do better.
    When ever someone ask me about getting a puppy I say too spend the extra money and make sure that all the checks have been done.

  12. #12

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    Just rereading through this post a little. It brought back a few memories about a dog I once trained probably eight years ago or so.
    I too have seen some real nice mix breed dogs come through my place.
    I once had a german sheperd lab mix that I was training for a gentleman. Looked like a german sheperd with the markings but had the body of a lab. Tall and lanky and fast. A retrieving machine.
    I took this lab mix to a picnic trial for retrievers put on by one of the local retriever clubs. They took my entry fee for her and even got a few chuckles when I pulled her off the truck. They weren't laughing any more after she ran. In fact I had a few come up and ask me to leave. I just laughed and told them to put there pride back in their wallet. Maybe one day their thousand dollar puppy will do that.

    But.......I still prefer a well bred retriever as I discussed before. Just wanted to mention that I too have seen some nice mix breeds that could do the work.

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    Member Huntress's Avatar
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    The other thing Honker, you have to consider where you are living now, You stated in one of your posts that in 04 you moved up here. Alaska is expensive, doesn't matter what it is. I don't know about anyone else, but I get my dogs brought up from out of state, (they arent any cheaper) we don't have the genetics I want up here. The genetics can only go so far without having to go through the expense of adding some new blood in the lines whether it be through shipped semen or bringing up a new pup. We can't just drive across state lines and find new blood, it takes a whole lot of money to get dogs not only shipped but to do the AI and progesterone testing, for the semen that was shipped as well.


    Maybe you would consider a pound puppy that you could train as well ( I see many labs listed, some even with papers from time to time), they are approx $150 includes all their shots, vet check, spay and neuter...Check the rescues too, I think Wetlands had one?!

    Hope this helps!
    "In the interest of protecting my privacy I will no longer be accepting Private Messages generated from this site and if you email me, it better be good!"

  14. #14

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    Honker, I breed Labs. I have only ever used 1 local stud and that was the very first litter I ever bred. All of the other studs I used, I found after a couple years research. I picked these studs based on health (health clearances), performance in the field (verified by hunt test or field trial titles) and temperament. I have used studs in KY, NC, and a few from TX. Once I found a suitable stud, I paid for collection and shipment of frozen semen in a VERY LARGE (it had to be rented and was expensive to ship) nitrogen shipping container. At the same time, I was having my female tested every other day or so to determine the day she was most fertile. At that time, she had surgery to implant the semen directly into her uterus.

    Once the puppies are born (in some cases mom has needed a c-section), all of their checkups/ shots and dew claws are done at the vets to establish a good record of their health. They are also microchipped before they leave for their new homes.

    I have given away pups before. A very dear friend lost her lab to cancer when it was 18 months old (not one of my pups) and I gave her one of mine as a replacement. I also gave a pup to a very good friend who I knew would have all the health clearances done and campaign the dog in hunt tests-good advertising for my lines.

    Breeding pups is extremely time consuming and expensive if you do it right.
    I had planned to do a litter this fall and use a semi local dog (one of Wetland Retrievers), but I am too involved in my childrens' activities right now and didn't feel I could devote enough time to the pups.

    I have charged $650-$850 for my pups and sell most of them to people in the lower 48. Those folks pay a big fee for shipping in addition to the puppy price, so I must be doing something right.

    You might want to check out Fairbanks Golden Retriever Rescue. I know they take in alot of labs. Their website is http://www.grrf.org/ Just keep checking with them until you find a pup that might meet your requirements.
    "It's the journey that's important, with experience and knowledge to be gained along the way, in the company of our faithful dogs and our good friends."
    Ralph Waldo Emerson

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    Member Sierra Hotel's Avatar
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    I'm a firm believer in good genetics make good dogs, but good genetics don't necessarily make good hunting dogs. Below are a couple of shots of Rudy, who I adopted from Byron at Wetland Retrievers in 2007 when he was a little over 1 yo.





    He's a good hunting companion (not great, but good - imagine a lab that doesn't like to swim . . . ), and he's got a wonderful disposition as a 90 lb. lap dog . . . and as you can see below, my youngest son and Rudy have a special bond . .



    I'm not interested in breeding, I wanted a dog that was a good family dog (90%) and a good hunting companion that could retrieve the few birds I manage to hit (10%). My vote for adopting a rescue dog . . .

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    Quote Originally Posted by honker View Post
    being on social security and not having a good job really sucks. I can't even pay for a postage stamp until the 28th..
    If this is truely your situation you can't afford a dog, period. The cost of a up is minor compared to what it will cost to take care of the dog. I would really reconsider getting a dog. Heck, even a free dog will cost a lot of money.

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    ok very well said. i've even said that until things change over here, i can't even afford a dog. Had an interview this week and it went well and i'll pass all the background stuff and drug test.

    SIERRA HOTEL, that male chocolate labrador is awefully sharp looking. He is majestic in his own right. My lab that just died in march, is a lot like your dog. i know there is a lot of involvement during the process of breeding and training that people like myself looking to buy a pup has to be aware of so much information that if we're not up to date on what works and what doesn't we might end up paying much more than truly what a specific pup is being sold for. it's a never ending hobby just like fly fishin or duck hunting.

    i appologize if it sounded like i was trashing. I think this job i could get will finally pull me out of the hole.

    that male lab is beautiful. he has a keen personality and i sure wish i had the chance to have another beauty like him. that dog is taking it all in. he looks into the sun and watches and sees everything. my lab never made a peep in the duck blind the 13 yrs i hunted with her. just amazing. 6 months old and retrieving pintails 200 yds away. i have tons of photos of her at that age retrieving doubles with a little help of course. she knew the game and she was happy to be involved. She would mess up sometimes and quit on a down duck in the tules but she snapped out of that and when you see a lab swimming out of thick tules and cattails, with that duck in her mouth and about 5 lbs of tules wrapped around her head and stretching down past her tail, it's a moment that should make us think never to be disrespectful to a lab. i knew of someone who looked at dogs and he had a lab...it's just a dog. it was -15 and i was gonna take him to the store but i refused to put my lab in the back of the truck at that temp. Besides it's my truck and my dog not his. He through a fit because my lab was riding in between us. it's just a dog? I think not.

    he's or she is a king & a queen My labs slept where ever they wanted. My lab when she was 7 weeks old licked my hand as i was driving her away from the trainer that very first day. she was thanking me. Dogs appreciate and know love just like we do.

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    Member duckslayer56's Avatar
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    Honker, Haven't you ever heard the expression Never spoil your bird dog...sheesh. Just kidding.

    My outlook on a hunting dog is the same as yours. They are treated just like anybody else in the house. He rides in the car in the passenger seat, or stretched out in the back seat. He even sleeps on my bed down by my feet. The way I see it is my dog is my best friend, and I thank god for every day that I have with him.
    Some people call it sky busting... I call it optimism
    "Swans are a gift" -DucksandDogs
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    Member honker's Avatar
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    good for you duckslayer, darn rights i'm thanking God too. I've been thanking Him for 28 yrs. it's been a rough road to walk but maybe i'll limp in through the pearl gates. I got that job so things in life are improving. I miss my dog so much. i still cry dog gone it! it's tough to think about it and there are days God helps me.

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