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Thread: Fishing with a float

  1. #1
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    Default Fishing with a float

    I have read several posts on another Alaska board about fishing jigs under a float. Is this an effective way to fish from shore? I would appreciate any input into the type of float and jigs that would be best for pink's and silver's.

    Thanks for taking time to reply.

  2. #2
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    Default Float. . .

    I've seen lots of fellows fish silvers by suspending a gob of eggs on a hook (egg loop) three or four feet below a bobber big enough to float the eggs and letting it drift down through the water. A few years back I watched some young men use the technique at Swiftwater Park, fishing from one of the walkways, and they did quite well.

    The technique should not be used for catch-and-release fishing because silvers often take the eggs deeply.

    It's my impression that pinks bite much better on lures than they do on eggs.

    Good luck. . .

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    The jig and a bobber method is very popular in Washington and Oregon, they catch Steelhead, Silvers, and Kings this way. I am not sure on the specifics as I have not done it up here. Basically, you put it right above the botttom and float it through the hole. I know of one angler who used this method on the Kenai this year and caught fish when the basic vibrax wasn't working. Look at ifish.net or piscatorialpursuits.com, there are message boards there that may be able to give you more specifics.

  4. #4

    Default Bobber and Jig

    I have used it to catch steelhead in Oregon, it works well. You cover a lot of river, a lot less snags, you get over rocks, you see immediately when you get a bite, and because the line and bobber is straight up you hook-up with the fish well.
    I use it with to catch salmon, but with a gobb of eggs, for all those same reasons.
    The downside is that it's hard to fish shoulder to shoulder that way, you need a lot of space. It doesn't work in places with fishermen on both sides.
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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    it works second only to indicator fishing on a fly
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    "indicator" = bobber

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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    yup but a fly line beats the crap out of a mono line for line control
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  8. #8

    Default distance

    Quote Originally Posted by ak_powder_monkey View Post
    yup but a fly line beats the crap out of a mono line for line control
    yeah, but no where near the distance. Fly-fishing with a bobber: no where near the distance you can cover with a spinrod and bobber, and it's difficult to adjust the line to greater depths if your leader isn't long enough.
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  9. #9
    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    One of my most productive methods is using a float on the river or ocean. I can cover allot of water while presenting the bait at a certain depth.
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  10. #10
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    Default slip bobbers

    I have been using these for several years now and they work great! If you aren't familiar with them, they use a little knot (some variation of a blood knot I think) using thread which is tightened on your main line. A small bead is slipped on the line, then the bobber. You simply adjust the knot by sliding it up or down the line and it acts as the bobber stop. Every time you reel up, the bobber will slide down to the lure, weight, swivel, whatever is below the bobber while the knot is simply reeled into your spool. This allows you to cast like normal, yet have the bobber set to whatever depth you like.

    The system works very well on kings at the Deshka both in the calm water as well as upstream in the moving stuff.

    Here's a website about them - http://www.hloutdoors.com/swami.htm
    AKmud
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    Member AKBighorn's Avatar
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    Not sure why your after pinks but I suppose to each his own. As for the bobbers you didn't say where you want to fish them. If your fishing in the rivers using a slip bobber setup similar what AKMud showed, and have it set up right you will catch alot more silvers than any other way using eggs. It creates a natural presentation rather than just sitting on the bottom. If your fishing from shore in the salt, I have caught Kings using a bobber fishing like you would for trout in a lake. I have also watched people catch Silvers in the same fashion.

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    Default Thanks for the information

    Thanks to everyone who took time to reply. I really appreciate your help. In response to AKBighorn, the reason I am targeting pinks is primarly due to timing. We will be in Alaska the last week of July of 07 and I will be fishing from shore. My research indicates this is early for silvers. We were in the Kenai in 05 and I fished for pinks and reds. I enjoy most all types of fishing but just don't like the fact that you must snag (legally) reds. I would rather catch fewer fish but catch them because I tricked them into biting. Don't have a problem with the methods used to catch the reds. It's just not for me. Anyway, if you take the reds and the silvers out of the picture it only leaves the lowly pinks. I know a lot of the locals look down on pinks but since we will not be keeping any fish we are not that particular about which species of salmon we catch. Just want to have something pull our string.

    If anyone has suggestions for targeting another salmon species I am certainly open.

    Thanks again for everyone's help.

  13. #13
    Member AKBighorn's Avatar
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    The last week of July is when the silvers are starting to get good in the Little Susitna in the Valley. Just thought I would throw that out there if you were interested. However, it is not open at that time for the use of bait.

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