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Thread: Well Hand Pump

  1. #1
    Member Bushpilot's Avatar
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    Exclamation Well Hand Pump

    Looking to see if anyone knows someone in the Valley who installs hand pumps for wells. The well is only about 30' deep, so it shouldn't be a problem. Thing is, I'm having trouble finding anyone who installs them, where I can get them, etc.

    If anyone has installed one themselves, and can give me some pointers on how difficult(or easy) it would be to do, I would appreciate it.

    Any and all info is appreciated, thanks.
    I refuse to tiptoe through life, only to arrive safely at death.


    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants."

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  2. #2

    Default Here ya go

    This looks simple enough...I think even I could install this.

    http://www.motherearthnews.com/Do-It...Your-Well.aspx

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    Quote Originally Posted by 257wby View Post
    This looks simple enough...I think even I could install this.

    http://www.motherearthnews.com/Do-It...Your-Well.aspx
    Thanks for the article, although it's dated 1984. Still would like to know of anyone who installs them or has installed them here in Alaska. I know a while back I had seen someone advertising on Craigslist to install a setup for less than $400, but I never took the info down.

    I'd like to get one installed before hard winter sets in, so any help is appreciated.
    I refuse to tiptoe through life, only to arrive safely at death.


    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants."

    Thomas Jefferson

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    I've put pitcher pumps on a few wells. It's really simple. The only "trick" is to use a foot valve to keep the water to the top of the pipe so you aren't required to prime the pump and lift the water every time. But, hand pumps that I'm familiar with don't work in sub-freezing temps and you have to open the foot valve to let the water drain down before it freezes in the pipe.

    Here's a link that may be applicable.

    http://www.absak.com/catalog/product...roducts_id/685

  5. #5

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    I would go to Alaska Pump and supply, off B St. and Dowling'ish maybe 56Th. They are super Smart, and Super helpful.

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    Thanks for the replies so far guys.

    Mr. Pid, I used to know someone who had one, and the kind they had would drain back down after use, so it could be used at any time of year.. Don't know the brand or who installed it, but I lost track of them and would like the same thing.

    Hopeak, thanks for the heads up, although I don't go into Anchorage often. Probably give them a call, and maybe they can refer someone out here in the valley.
    I refuse to tiptoe through life, only to arrive safely at death.


    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants."

    Thomas Jefferson

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    I bet you could adapt a hand pump
    http://www.drumpumps.com/handpumps.aspx

    whats the static level?

    Think after a while the arm would get tired. You could get a 12v motorized pump to run off a car battery. A double acting diaphram drum pump will fill a five gal bucket in 25 pumps. The static level in the well will determine the head which will make you work harder. I hope its not 30' static level.

    There is a pitcher pump on that link

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bushpilot View Post
    Hopeak, thanks for the heads up, although I don't go into Anchorage often. Probably give them a call, and maybe they can refer someone out here in the valley.

    They have the pumps at Centeral Plumbing, and I think Ferguson's also has them.

  9. #9
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    When I was a kid we had a hand pump and our well was 110' deep

    It was an 8" well and we installed 1 1/4" galv pipe in it. Was'nt to hard from what i remember, I still have the clamps that we installed it with.

    All you need is a clamp that goes under the coupling to hold it till you get the next one threaded in. ( warning galv. pipe is heavy)

    30' feet you could do in 5 foot sections by your self pretty easy, you could even cut your sucker rod in the same lenghts.

    Just build yourself a tri-pod above the well, put a pully on it and have the clamps ready.

    We drilled a drain hole down at about 10' and it would take about 4 pumps before we got water coming out.

    Me and my brother hauled water with that pump for over 10 years. At 20 below or colder, we had to take a pan of water and pour it over the top of the pump just to get the handle working.

    This thing was a little bigger than your pitcher pump so I see no problems with you doing ityourself.

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    100 foot deep is along way if thats where the water level was in the casing (static level) in 1 1/4 pipe thats approximately 53 pounds of water in the pump string.

    My well is 72 feet deep but that has nothing to do with the head. The static level and string volume determines the head.

    I would certainly use poly pipe for the pump string pipe if I was putting it down the well by hand. You only need to go down the hole a short ways past the static level also. The rate of your well recovery will determine how far below the static level and how fast you can pump water out of it before you start sucking air. Probably not an issue with a hand pump in a casing of any size.

  11. #11
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    Misc_54,

    Back in 67, nobody even thought about plastic pipe.

    Agreed the size of the casing has nothing to do with any kind of pump you install, its just what my dad had drilled. We had anywhere fro 14' to 25' of water in the casing at all times depending on what time of year.

    Sucker rod would probably not have worked well in plastic at that depth anyway, cant say.

    The weight ratio I cant tell you what it was, all I know as an 7 year old it took both hands, as a 15 year old one hand was easy.

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    Thanks for all the replies guys. I haven't had time to follow up on this, but the static level is 9', with the pump at 28-30'.
    I refuse to tiptoe through life, only to arrive safely at death.


    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants."

    Thomas Jefferson

  13. #13

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    If you're out in the Valley you might try talking to the people at the cabin water place across from Spenard Builders...doubt they install but they do carry supplies for cabin water systems
    Buzzy

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    Default Fairly simple

    Hand pumps are easy to install in shallow wells. The hardest part(not real hard) is rod spacing (getting the plunger in the pump so it does not hit the top or bottom of the cylinder). If you plan on using it alot you might use galvanized pipe, if not I would use schedule 80 pvc threaded pipe. Galvanized pipe gives you structeral integrity but corrosion over the years,usually comes in 21ft length's. PVC pipe is non corrosive but less structal integrity, comes in 20ft lengths.
    There are a large variety of pump cylinders for in the well, brass & cast iron are most common with leather seals. The diameter of the cylinder determines how deep you can set the pump along with the stroke length(how far the cylinder travels up and down) gives the dispacement of water per stroke. If you put a 3"- 3 1/2" inch pump around 20' deep it will be easy to pump with a long stroke this will give the most water with the least effort. You need to drill a 1/8 inch hole in the pipe below the frost line in your area, this allows the water to drain down so it does not freeze in the upper section of pipe. As mentioned earlier you may have to heat the pump head if extremely cold.
    A pitcher pump pulls water up instead of pushing it. You can pull water up to 24 feet in depth with them. You place a pipe in the well below water level with a pitcher on top and you can get water. You must keep water on hand & keep the leather's wet to pull a prime on the pump. When you quit pumping the water drains back down to the water level in the well.
    Pitcher pumps are more economical but limited in depth. Hand pump's can go deeper but you need a pump handle cylinder & pump rod.
    I hope this helps.

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