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Thread: moose or caribou for beginner (also happy to pack out your meat)

  1. #1

    Default moose or caribou for beginner (also happy to pack out your meat)

    Hey all,

    I moved in last August and my wife got me a nice Remington M700-CDL for Christmas. I am about to get resident status and was wondering if a moose or caribou hunt is even a possibility for me this year.

    I obviously wouldn't have any T1 permits and haven't applied for any "R" permits yet. I also don't have a snow machine or ORV. I live in Eagle River and would be able to drive where ever.

    For 'bou, it looks like Unit 13 is impossible, but it looks like I could still get into 12 or 20. Do either of those units present any sort of real possibility to hike in to set up camp? Or is everything so far off the road that I would need some sort of gas propulsion?

    For moose, I really have no idea and would assume it's just way over my head.

    Any general ideas as to whether I should even be worried about getting out there this year?

    Also, if anyone wants company or a hand, I'd be more than happy to help pack in gear or pack out meat just for experience, more or less just to get my feet wet.

  2. #2
    Member ducks n' dogs's Avatar
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    Default you wont get much help that way.......

    Mike,



    While your enthusiasm to help pack gear/meat is commendable you wont get the info you are after that way. I have found that the members of AOD are very willing to help each other out however that information sharing comes with a price. People want to see that you have done some homework, look in the archives for info on moose and caribou hunting, talk with other hunters around where you live, You will find tons of great info. Once you have narrowed it down a bit then ask for help with specific areas (i.e. - certain drainages, or mountains. NOT entire GMU's). You should also contact the Bio's in the area you are looking at they are a good resource for up to date info (on most areas) again they will respond with better information to specific questions rather than "where can I go to shoot a moose?".

    Good luck,



    PS

    This was not intended to discourage you but rather help you get the info you are looking for.

  3. #3
    Member Vince's Avatar
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    also mike...

    you have a new rifle... what is your experience hunting? what kind of shape are you in?

    other then a strong back what can you offer to a hunter that lets you tag along?

    being stuck in a tent over 4-10 days due to weather can educate you on your hunting buddy. folks need to know that you are compatible with them.

    do you know how to skin? cape any of that? have yo any experience with meat care?

    you know folks around here don't mid helping a guy out.. calling him over to teach him etc..

    i have harvested many moose near home in the past and called new guys to come learn to skin and carry and sent them home with a quarter of it.

    there are several recent threads here in hunting on moose and bear hunting for beginners, as well meat and trophy care etc...

    i would start by reading those. and asking questions of your own so that folks get a flavor for you and you will meet like minded persons that are compatible as hunting partners.

    and a good hunting buddy is hard to find.. you should not be competeing with him... but you both should Complete each other in the field...
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  4. #4

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    Thanks all. I've been making my way through old posts and that's pretty much why I was left wondering if it was possible at all.

    I guess I'm not asking for a specific location, not sweet spots or honey holes, just a general impression. Like, "yeah, it's possible to do this without an ORV or snow machine." Or "no, you don't have the proper means of transportation, you're too green, and you'll freeze to death or get shot or eaten by a bear." Or "no, if you haven't already applied for a permit in those areas, you're hosed."

    As for previous experience, I've only ever taken white tails. Could field dress and skin, but would be pretty rusty.

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    Member garnede's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by michigan_mike View Post
    Thanks all. I've been making my way through old posts and that's pretty much why I was left wondering if it was possible at all.

    I guess I'm not asking for a specific location, not sweet spots or honey holes, just a general impression. Like, "yeah, it's possible to do this without an ORV or snow machine." Or "no, you don't have the proper means of transportation, you're too green, and you'll freeze to death or get shot or eaten by a bear." Or "no, if you haven't already applied for a permit in those areas, you're hosed."

    As for previous experience, I've only ever taken white tails. Could field dress and skin, but would be pretty rusty.
    It is always possible, but not always likely. I am sure you have seen the treads of people shooting moose in their back yards. A caribou is the closest animal in size to a whitetail, unless you hunt black tail. But access for caribou is tough from the road and it might be too late to do it from the air. Tags are not needed but can sometimes help. A moose quater weighs as much as a whole white tail.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by michigan_mike View Post
    Thanks all. I've been making my way through old posts and that's pretty much why I was left wondering if it was possible at all.

    I guess I'm not asking for a specific location, not sweet spots or honey holes, just a general impression. Like, "yeah, it's possible to do this without an ORV or snow machine." Or "no, you don't have the proper means of transportation, you're too green, and you'll freeze to death or get shot or eaten by a bear." Or "no, if you haven't already applied for a permit in those areas, you're hosed."

    As for previous experience, I've only ever taken white tails. Could field dress and skin, but would be pretty rusty.

    first off mike i went many years before i was finacally able enough to afford my own ATVs... we hunted many years with out them.

    so yes it is do able..

    second on game care. there may e those that say " size matters" but moose vs dear? it is all the same motion, one just last longer then the other...
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Mike - You might want to consider a black bear hunt. If you're willing to climb, you can find good populations of black bear south of Anchorage along the road system. No atv needed - just a good set of legs and lungs to match. Do some searches here for Unit 7 black bear or Kenai Peninsula black bear. There should be plenty of information to get you started. As an added bonus, bears that are feeding on berries in late fall are very good eating.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    I've got a fair bit of experience on how not to find legal moose for one limited to road access. I figured before moving up that everyone hunted, and I'd have no problem finding a partner. That never happened, and my work and family schedule got so busy that I've almost given up on big game hunting.

    Moose populations are quite low state wide, so unless you've been hunting an area for 10-20 years and really know it, you are highly unlikely to just get off the road and call in a moose. It might happen, but don't count on it. Even areas that are closed to ORV's, I've seen people using planes to find the moose, then they hike and canoe in to get them.

    For caribou, unless you're willing to drive up the hall road, and hike out 5 miles, then it is a fly in proposition for areas that are harvest for bou.

    The biggest question is, how many miles can you hike with a 100# load. Devide that by 10 for moose and thats how far you should shoot one from your vehicle. Devide that by 3 for caribou.

    It's taken me a long time to realize it, but for a new SC hunter w/o orv, your best bet is to concentrate on small game, and black bears. There are plenty of opportunities not far away, and you'll hone your skills traveling in the Alaska woods.

    The other advise is to save up $1000-2000 a year to cover expenses to fly out to a hunt. And spend the year researching areas to hunt. There is alot of time and $ that goes into getting yourself in position to take a shot on big game in AK.

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    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
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    Man you guys like to work, I shoot mine right on the river bank and in the boat he goes.

    Not saying it aint work to get the boat to these places, but the furtherest I have ever packed one is 300 yards.

    17 and counting. 6 over 60"

    On another note for some of you walking up a creek or a to a pond, think about taking a small cheap raft that you can float it to a closer place of easier walking, or to where you left your 4-wheeler, boat etc.

    I would'nt get discouraged Mike, alot of hunters have had thier buddys back out at the last minute for some reason or the other leaving them in a lurch. Just make sure if you are lucky enough to fill a spot that you pull your wieght.

    Hunting in the interior for moose is still 11 days away. Good Luck.

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    Member AKHunterNP's Avatar
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    If you don't mind driving the Haul Road will work. And if you have a bow and bow certification you can hunt inside the 5 mile coridor. I'm taking my wife up the Haul Rd. when I get back from Iraq. You just need to understand that you aren't walking 5 miles, it is a minimum of 10 miles, 5 each way. And that is if there is a caribou standing there at the 5 mile mark, which happens sometimes. The terrain is hell also, picture walking on a field of soccer balls. I like walking it when there is snow on the ground and using snowshoes better.
    "...arms like laws discourage and keep the invader and plunderer in awe...Horrid mischief would ensue were the good deprived of the use of them." -Thomas Paine

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post

    The biggest question is, how many miles can you hike with a 100# load. Devide that by 10 for moose and thats how far you should shoot one from your vehicle. Devide that by 3 for caribou.

    It's taken me a long time to realize it, but for a new SC hunter w/o orv, your best bet is to concentrate on small game, and black bears. There are plenty of opportunities not far away, and you'll hone your skills traveling in the Alaska woods.
    Thanks for the advice. That is pretty much what I've been thinking. Without an ORV and with only a harvest tag, it seems like this would mean 60-100 miles of rountripping gear and lugging quarters. That would probably be a physical feat I'd have to train for and work up to (and probably also drop 25 lbs).

    Black bear in the Chugach next year and ducks in September seem a lot easier to tackle.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rock_skipper View Post

    On another note for some of you walking up a creek or a to a pond, think about taking a small cheap raft that you can float it to a closer place of easier walking, or to where you left your 4-wheeler, boat etc.

    I would'nt get discouraged Mike, alot of hunters have had thier buddys back out at the last minute for some reason or the other leaving them in a lurch. Just make sure if you are lucky enough to fill a spot that you pull your wieght.

    Hunting in the interior for moose is still 11 days away. Good Luck.
    I think I'll definitely take your advice on both points. Get a raft and look for open spots. I spend far too much time fishing to not have a raft anyway (I ran the Kenai from Cooper to Jims once this year in a SOAR raft and it was a blast!).

    Quote Originally Posted by AKHunterNP View Post
    If you don't mind driving the Haul Road will work. And if you have a bow and bow certification you can hunt inside the 5 mile coridor. I'm taking my wife up the Haul Rd. when I get back from Iraq. You just need to understand that you aren't walking 5 miles, it is a minimum of 10 miles, 5 each way. And that is if there is a caribou standing there at the 5 mile mark, which happens sometimes. The terrain is hell also, picture walking on a field of soccer balls. I like walking it when there is snow on the ground and using snowshoes better.
    This just sounds like something I'd have to do regardless of other hunting opportunities. As in, the quintessential ALASKAN adventure/death march. Maybe Santa will bring me a bow (though I am pretty much laughing at the thought of how bad I will be at it, it's been like 10 years since I've tried). Stay safe out there in Iraq, hope you get back before the temps up there on the Haul Road get too silly.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Mike - You might want to consider a black bear hunt. If you're willing to climb, you can find good populations of black bear south of Anchorage along the road system. No atv needed - just a good set of legs and lungs to match. Do some searches here for Unit 7 black bear or Kenai Peninsula black bear. There should be plenty of information to get you started. As an added bonus, bears that are feeding on berries in late fall are very good eating.
    Thanks Brian. I'll check that out. I'm all about hiking around the Chugach anyway, so why not?

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    From one Michigander to an ex-Michigander, congrats on making it to Alaska.

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    Mike,

    12 years ago when I moved here I got in the truck with my rifle and pack and drove until I found what I thought looked like a good area to hunt. I had no 4 wheeler or anything. Strictly on foot.

    Made sure I was legal for moose in the area I went (unit 13) and started walking and hunting. I was lucky and shot a spike fork moose my 2nd day out in the field.

    I studied the animals and went for it.

    It is never to late and the best way to learn is get out there.

    There is many places to hunt right off the road. There doesn't have to be a parking spot for it to be good.

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